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Though I live in a rural area where there's not much traffic, which I'm thankful for, but being alert is always a good idea cause you never know. Just last week I was cruising down the highway at 60MPH. There was a truck sitting on side of the road. As soon as I got close, it decides to whip around and I had to jam on the brakes fairly hard. I wouldn't say I was close to an accident, but I didn't like the feeling one bit. As far as I know we were the only two vehicles on the road.
 

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Did it seem to you, with regard to the primary video rider, that he was running the split on that road, and did you think he might have been in less of a precarious position, had he been staying back from the vehicle, and remaining in his lane?

As for the second guy, on the scooter............well..........

-soupy
 

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It would have been nice if WTNH showed the whole video, we only got a glimpse of it. But I do like the officers advice, it's spot on. Thank God my dad watches WFSB, he'd be calling me all worried....

Four fallen riders this weekend here. Thats 4 drivers too many. I was just thinking about going without a helmet, as most riders in this state don't wear them. Thanks for sharing this, my helmet is staying on.
 

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The motorcycle rider was uneducated about the risks of riding in traffic and was an accident waiting to happen. He rode in the car's blind spots during the entire video and he rode on the far right of his lane, where he was very close to adjacent drivers. To me, he was unskilled and his lane splitting skills will get him hurt or killed.:confused:

The only one with any sense was the scooter rider. I'm sure his helmet was off so he'd look good on TV news;)

In that scenario, I ride to the left of the center of the fast lane at all times because normally you only have to watch to your right for intrusions into your space.

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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I think a lot of bikers are carrying over bad driving habits from cars, tailgating being the number one issue. I think he was tailgating and had to move over when the car in front started braking, and the car behind was trying to find somewhere to go, it is hard to tell. I hate to see bikers tailgating, it is like they are asking for an accident.

LoupGarou
 

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I think a lot of bikers are carrying over bad driving habits from cars, tailgating being the number one issue.
I think there is the feeling that they can stop quickly if needed. What they don't realize is they have to consider how quickly the traffic behind them has to stop. There's a lot to think about when riding.
 

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Did it seem to you, with regard to the primary video rider, that he was running the split on that road, and did you think he might have been in less of a precarious position, had he been staying back from the vehicle, and remaining in his lane?

As for the second guy, on the scooter............well..........

-soupy
Looks to me that he was riding with another bike with him front/right and the other bike rear/left. It looked like his position on the highway was OK. When the car skidded up behind him he moved to a more defensive position (around the car that has stopped). Seems to me he did the right thing.
 

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Last week a buddy of mine in California was hit in traffic by a car changing lanes. He has a big cut and bruise on his left arm and ribs where the mirror hit him. He was literally next to the car, even with the front door. The cage driver did not even look over. Expecting people to drive like they have a brain will get you hurt. Unfortunately in urban places you just have to ride close to them.
 

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I've ridden through congested Chicago traffic but I certainly prefer not to do that type riding. I've considered taking my motorcycle instead of a car when I visit my 100 year old mother in a NY nursing home as well as my brother on Long Island, but the thought of traveling through the congested roads of NJ, then through Manhattan and on to Long Island have so far kept me from two wheeled travel for that trip. Big city drivers tailgate, cut from lane to lane and otherwise drive in ways that are even more dangerous than normal traffice for motorcyclists. Putting up with that for a short distance is manageable but doing so for several hours of riding to get to my destination may be more risky that I am willing to accept. When I see riders in New York City or the urban environment of Nassau County, NY (western Long Island) it doesn't seem like this type riding would be much fun anyway so for now I think I will stick to four wheel, air conditioned travel.
 

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I think the rider was acting in a dangerous manner. From the short clip it appeared he was in fact tailgating and lane splitting. As others have mentioned he also was in a bad lane position. I don't have the traffic experience of Vito or any of you who ride in LA, but I have ridden in Knoxville, Nashville, Atlanta and Charlotte pretty regularly. You MUST be hyper aware of your surroundings. Better to get there a bit later than you planned than to not get there at all.
 

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If you've ridden successfully in Nashville, in rush hour traffic and have lived to talk about it, you could ride through the gates of hell and not get a scratch.:mad:

I rode through there on the Interstate at about 5 PM, on a weekday on my new 2012 Goldwing and all 8 lanes in each directions were full of Zombies on speed or crack, changing directions, right and left, like Leaf eater Ants in Africa and I was a nervous wreck by the time I got maybe 20 miles east of there.:confused:

Los Angeles traffic is a piece of cake compared to Nashville, in my as usual very humble opinion.:wink:

Sam:coffeescreen:
 
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