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"1.To be able to post links or images your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Please remove links from your message, then you will be able to submit your post."

I had to remove all my ride report and pictures...sorry.




Yeah, yeah...I know...Beer, Bacon and Boobies.
Also known as...



So let me just get that out of the way.








Hi there, my name is Gwen.
I'm also Shoganai on other M/C boards as well.


I’ve been riding since an early spring day in 1999 when I was filling up my 1985 Dodge Caravan with fuel. I kinda threw a fit at the pump. See, I thought it cost a lot of money to fill up. I said out loud, “I’m going to buy a motorcycle!”


I drove straight to the Honda shop, walked in and when the salesman asked, “Can I help you?” I said “I want to buy a motorcycle”. Even as the words fell out of my mouth, I couldn’t believe I was the one speaking them.


The look on his face when I answered his questions was priceless, “No, I’ve never even sat on one. No, I have no idea what kind of bike I want. No, I’ve not taken any motorcycle classes. Yes, I’m sure I want to buy a motorcycle”


To his credit he did the right thing in my opinion. He sold me a used Honda Rebel and helped me pick out my first riding gear, a helmet, Joe Rocket jacket and gloves. Of course I had to wait for them to deliver the bike the following week, so I went to the DMV for my endorsement. A week later it arrived. The delivery guy took an hour showing and explaining to me where the gas goes, all the controls, how to adjust the chain and some general safety tips like don’t break in turns and what to do if I get a flat tire.


Then it hit me! Holy ****! I bought a motorcycle!!!


I walked past it for a week to drive my van to work, still thinking ‘What the hell were you thinking Gwen’. I was scared ****less to tell my parents. How silly is that, I was 37 years old. But I knew they are NOT going to like it and have never had issues with expressing their thoughts. Don’t get me wrong, they love me and only want what’s best for me.


Well, the weekend had arrived and it was time to go to work. In the midafternoon, I walked around the bike like I was dancing with a cobra, afraid to touch it yet fascinated by it. So beautiful, so deadly. Like the old folks used to say, ‘you need to poop or get off the pot’. So I donned my riding gear for the first time, and all the while feeling like an astronaut suiting up to head into the unknown. The metaphor was not wasted on me.


I sat on the bike for the first time and studied the controls as I ran my fingers over them and softly spoke their names under my breath, “throttle”, “clutch”, “front break” “lights”. My right hand grasped the key and turned it to ‘on’ and ………….. I pushed the start button.


Oh my God! That was so cool! I thought. The bike purred and something sleeping in my soul stirred. I felt it move, and a broad smile broke like the morning sun across my face. The thing inside me blinked and looked around.


At the time, I lived on 60 acres with a mile to the first pavement and that concerned me, but there was nothing I could do about it, so I gently rolled on the throttle and eased out on the clutch and the bike rolled forward.


I made it to the pavement without dropping it and felt damn lucky though it never behaved like I was going to. I then rode up and down the blacktop until I was sure I could make it go, stop and turn. I figured that’s all I needed to know. (Boy, was I naive, but that’s for another time) I rode back home, found an old backpack, and stuffed my nursing uniform, shoes, comb and lunch in it.


Upon closing the door to leave for work that night, I knew my life had changed, though to what degree I was oblivious. I rode 60+ miles to work on 55mph roads doing 45mph and waving all the traffic behind around me because I was too frightened to go faster. (I got over that to within one point of losing my license)


By the time I arrived at work and parked the bike, the once sleeping entity was fully awakened. It was excited, impassioned and most of all joyful. It was ebullient! And I reflected that feeling in my smile and my pounding heart.


That was 1999 and since that day I never looked back. I rode over 20,000 miles that year. Learned how to deal with the weather, the road and traffic. I have since been through the Honda Rebel, a Honda Shadow 600, a Honda 1300 VTXc, (2) 2005 BMW R1200ST’s and now have my 1993 K1100RS (which I’ve had for years) and a new-to-me blue 1994 K1100RS.


Every year after 1999 I rode 30,000 to 40,000 miles and in 2006 I rode 60,300 miles. My total now is a little over 400,000 miles. In time, I eventually took the MSF courses. I rode my first 100,000 miles 100% alone. I have had several crashes and walked away from them all by the grace of God and wearing all the gear didn’t hurt. All totaled I broke both collar bones (left twice, right once) in three separate crashes, broke my sternal-clavical joint with cardiac contusion, 3 ribs, ACL right knee, concussion, burst fracture T6, fracture T7, and fractures of T5 through T10 left lateral spinus processes and most recently, my left thumb.

Stupid is as stupid does

k11og (dot) org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=12139

I’ve hit a car, a dog and deer, a guardrail and the road. I’ve known the exquisite pain of frozen hands and exalted in beat-to-death exhaustion from a 1500-mile day. I’ve known the love of strangers that helped this wayward traveler with a tank of gas, directions, a warm, safe bed to rest my road-weary bones and helping hands with open hearts that helped me do a trannyectony / clutchectomy on my K1100RS while broke down in High Level, Alberta. I’ve known the joy of shared stories of the road with other riders that “get it” and feel the acceptance of my fellow riders around a crackling fire. I’ve slept on the road by or on my bike and felt she was watching over me. I’ve posed her with signs and flowers and mountains and at time when she was naked on the lift getting some maintenance or a new toy.


I love my K1100RS like no bike I’ve even known. Her official name is Ichimokusan, which means “as fast as I can go” but her nickname is The Shop Whore. Within 2 years from the date of purchase, she cost me over $10,000, (long story) but I loved her like an S&M mistress. No matter how she hurt my wallet, I kept going back for more. Love is a strange thing indeed.

I love trying to convince my K11's that all bikes are dirt bikes, some are just better at than others. They just need more practice.









I didn't spare my R-bikes either











They said all people are mechanics, some are just better at it than others and I just need more practice. (Even if I'm 2500 miles from home)



advrider (dot) com/forums/showthread.php?t=142933

Here are a couple of my ride reports.

I’m the first woman to document this Iron Butt ride from East Port, ME to LaPush, WA in < 72 hours. I’m also the first person to document that ride for West to East and to do both back to back.

Sunrise to Sunset Insanity; Watt was I Thinking - NC-17 version
k11og (dot) org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=12076


Sunrise to Sunset Insanity; Watt was I Thinking - Iron Butt Mag
k11og (dot) org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=12074

Some of my certs.




Some of my wrenching.
k11og (dot) org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=5777

Custom wiring harness
Not bad for a wiring no0b
k11og (dot) org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=12215


Thank you for reading my introduction and I look forward to reading this forum.
 

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Sounds like a good partner for Rollin' and his long rides on his Victory....

and Welcome from Middle America (Missouri)
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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Okay... I am in awe! Between you and Rollin'... well, you guys show the true spirit of motorcycling. :thumbsup:

Welcome to the forum. I look forward to hearing about more of your adventures.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Okay... I am in awe! Between you and Rollin'... well, you guys show the true spirit of motorcycling. :thumbsup:

Welcome to the forum. I look forward to hearing about more of your adventures.
I'm not worthy of standing in Rollin's shadow.

Thank you for the welcome.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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I figured you probably already knew (or knew of) Rollin.....

Anyway

 

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Welcome from Texas! A lot of cool pictures and a nice backstory to how you got to riding. I hope I can put down 400k miles some day. Also the Arctic Circle picture is pretty awesome!
 

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Visionary
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Welcome..and all I can say is DAMN!
I just got back into riding this year after a 30 year hiatus and did 11,000 miles in 6 months and I thought I was riding a lot...
 

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Welcome from East Tennessee!
Thats a Helluva lot of miles! My hats off to you!!
I hope you will post pics of some of the more adventurous rides!!
Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you Dodsfall for allowing my pics to link. May I go back and edit the ride report links to remove the (dot)?

Thank you for the welcome Revelator, mike721 and TennesseeZ.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I need to make something clear upfront.

I have had several persons show interest in joining me on this ride.

This is not a ride-along event at all and never was intended to be.

First, Charles rode it alone. The only other persons that will be riding this with me will be the rider of the 1916 Indian (if that ever shapes up) and I have a one-man film crew riding with us and my husband who'll be waiting at the end of the day ahead of us.

I have very strict permissions from private land owners that include only 2 bikes will be permitted to pass over their property.

On a personal level, I don't like riding with groups, even as few as 5, and I don't want to be mindful of any other riders.

This is my personal project; into which I have dedicated every moment I could steal from sleep and husband. I know exactly what I want to do and how I want it done. I have exactly ONE chance to get it right and I do not want any distractions.

I pray those reading this will understand.

That said, if anyone wants to join me at the end of the day, I would GREATLY enjoy that!

.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Here's a bit of history. Typed as written from the 1916 Automobile Blue Book. I love the population numbers and historical references.




Route 293 Winston -Salem to Charlotte, N.C. – 98.7 m.

Route map, page 348

Reverse Route, No. 307




Via Statesville and Mooresville. All good improved sand-clay road with 15 miles of macadam. This connects at Statesville with Route 253 to Hickory and Asheville.




Descriptive Outline – Leaving the “Dual City” of Winston-Salem, we shortly pass through the mill-town of Hanes and continue southwest to the village of Clemmonsville. At points along the way, the Pilot and Saura Town Mountains are in plain view. Clemmonsville is an old settlement of about 100 people, located in a very fertile section. In the old days, it’s Inn or Tavern was noted as a stopping-place for the stage-coaches passing through to the west. Here is located a modern and up-to-date Farm Life School, well endowed by one of its former citizens, Benton Clemmons. Leaving Clemmonsville, we cross the splendid steel bridge over the North Yadkin River. This bridge cost the counties of Forsyth and Davie $36,000. The lands along the river are very fertile and the scenery at the bridge is very picturesque and pleasing. Leaving the river, we traverse some of the finest timber lands of Davie County to the village of Farmington, located in one of the finest sections in North Carolina. The soil hereabouts is red and of a ginger-cake color, quite similar to the land around Huntsville, Ala. Farmington was settled by thrifty and prosperous farmers, and the village lies on the road which was surveyed and cut out by Daniel Boone and three others from Shallow Ford on the Yadkin to Salisbury in Rowan County. The village has a population of about 100, and possesses a flour mill, several stores, a number of churches, and a public school. After leaving Farmington, the highway follows practically the road surveyed and cut out by Boone as far as Mocksville. Over this road the army of Lord Cornwallis passed, crossing the Yadkin River at Shallow Ford on its way to Guilford Court House. There are Modern steel bridges over Cedar, Dutchman, and other creeks in the county, over which this highway passes. The valleys along these creeks and the rolling lands between them are as fine as can be found anywhere. Mocksville, formally known as “Mock’s Old field” is the seat of Davie County. The county is about 20 miles square and was named for General William R. Davie. This section was original known as “The Forks of the Yadkin” and the county was cut out of Rowan in 1837. Mocksville is a town of 1500 inhabitants, and has a new $35,000 Court House, two flour mills, a good hotel, two chair factories, a large furniture factory and modern cotton gins. The soil in this vicinity is very rich and the timber land is plentiful. Leaving Mocksville, we traverse a fine section of country, and about two miles of town, pass through the farm on which Squire Boone, the father of Danial Boone, once lived and in sight of the graveyard in which his remains and those of his wife now rest. A modest stone marks their burial place. Continuing, we cross Bear Creek and Hunting Creek, passing through a section of fertile farming country, dotted with thrifty farm homes, and shortly come to Statesville, the most important intermediate point in our route. At mileage point 39.3 one may connect for Hickory, a progressive manufacturing town of some 5000 people. Statesville is a thriving town of 8000 inhabitants, and is a manufacturing and commercial center of no mean importance. An important factor in the progress of the city – “Attractive Statesville” as it is often called – has been an energetic work car-system, and is the home of the Statesville Female College. The city has a number of splendid public buildings, wide, well-paved streets, and all the modern conveniences that make it desirable for residential, as well as business purposes. Here is located the largest Herbarium in the world and also the largest flour mill in this section. Leaving Statesville, the road to Charlotte traverses a more thickly settled section of the State. Following the general line of the Southern Railway, we soon come to Barium Springs, where is located the Barium Orphans Home of the Presbyterian Synod of North Carolina. A mile beyond is the thriving village of Troutmans, and about ten miles further is Mooresville, a junction point of the Southern Railway, with its population on 3000. We now come to the hamlet of Mount Mourne, which derives its name from the skirmish between the British of Cornwallis’ Army and the Americans at Torrence’s Tavern in the days of the Revolution. Many British were killed; hence mourning, and “Mount Mourne.” Just across the Iredell County Line, in Mecklenburg County, is the college town of Davidson. The college (Presbyterian), which we pass on our left, was founded early in the last century and was named in honor of the Davidson family, who contributed to its founding. Continuing south along the Southern Railway through Huntsville and Croft, we reach Charlotte, which is described in the Charlotte Section.



This is an example of a route in the 1919 Automobile Blue Book.





I've been using these books, 1915, 1916 & 1919, to help select the roads used for the re-building of Charles's ride because they were the major roads of that time.




.
 
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