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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the first video in a series of repair videos for the VSTAR 1100 that begins with my VSTAR that was stored up for a time due to reasons beyond my control leading to gas rot. This is not really a big deal as it can be solved doing a comprehensive maintenance, something I do anyway on this 2001 Silverado edition. I did take this opportunity to play around this Seafoam, just for fun, before tossing the stuff, I wouldn't believe it would ever reach the effected jets [020 in my case] as small as 14 on stock in a dump and pray application, so its moot, that argument is officially settled. No amount of seafoam will fix plugged 1100 carbs unless you submerge the carbs in a bucket of the stuff for several days. Thats beyond the point anyway. You don't get proper maintenance and repair from a bottle, you get it from proper work.

Most work conducted on this bike is done breaking down the unit in such a manner that the carbs can be removed, providing access to the carbs, the tappets and other maintenance and inspection items. This video covers these breakdown preparation actions as well is what is found along the way, so that items can be inspected and repaired in upcoming videos. This is something anyone can do, therefor no gimmick is required, no tricks. Basic tools, no rush, and control of all removed parts as demonstrated, enjoy.....




This is the first in a two part series on the complete disassembly, cleaning and reassembly of my dual Mikuni CV carbs for the VSTAR 1100. It goes into much much much detail.
Note that after spending the same day on the Delorean AC I said a part was an 'orifice tube' and not emulsion tube. Further note that canned air was used in the example. I would never do a final cleaning with canned air. I use real air pressure from a compressor at much higher pressures. The canned air is only a prop. Leak testing is important, you will notice the jig. Notice the jig....



This is the conclusion in a two part series on the complete disassembly, cleaning and reassembly of my dual Mikuni CV carbs for the VSTAR 1100. It goes into much much much detail.
Emphasis here on mating the carbs back to each other on the bracket once both are completed.




In this video the regularly scheduled maintenance procedure of checking and setting the valve lash on the VSTAR 1100 is conducted showing the technique that i've used over the years to accomplish this task which is pretty much by the book. I like to keep my numbers center of the margins.

This is done in conjunction with the teardown video as the carbs are removed and the access is very easy.


 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
In this video we look at an issue discovered with the shutoff valve during some maintenance done on the bike. Since the bike was being disassembled from the breakdown video, the whole tank was on the bench where the valve could be removed and the tank could be flushed.

The valve was completely refitted with a gasket replacement kit.


In this video, having completed several maintenance procedure including the Carb rebuild, valve adjustment and tank and cable repairs, the reassembly of everything is now underway. This process is the exact reverse as the first video in this series. The first being the carb, situating it between the frame and ultimately into the manifold. This is followed by the 90 degree rubber hoses for the intake. The fuel lines can then be safely connected as well as the electrical connections. This brings the project to the choke cable re-connection, followed by the two throttle cables.

Normally an airbox would follow this but I have a Maxair podkit. Regardless, this is a good time to purge the residual fuel in the system before reconnecting everything back to the carbs by way of the electric pump and a small gas tank.. The option to replace the fuel filter is also shown here. Then the hoses are reconnected to the carbs and the bowls are filled. This is the time to check for leaks, both under the carbs and in the 90 degree tubes to see if the carbs overflowed. The airbox then goes back on followed by the gas tank which has a main harness reconnected. followed by the fuel line to the gas tank.

Yarn is added to the timing chain tensioner to confirm a leak suspicion. Firing up the bike for the first time points towards an immediate electrical problem requiring repair. This is the second time these connectors failed. This time 3 sealed unions were made to solve the problem. The bike is restarted and synced to confirm everything is working good. With that the rest of the assembly is conducted, plastichrome and all.



After getting the bike back together, the wife and I took our bikes to the coast for a test drive. Id noticed when letting off of the throttle that the speedometer started shutting down which immediately gave me cause for concern as this is a low voltage indication and cause for charging system failure. Testing showed however this was not the case. Why would the speedometer and then later discovered the turning signals only work just fine when laying on the gas but die when slowing down? A shorted cable? an opening ground? connecting or disconnecting from inertial forces????



In this video I conduct what is a standard oil change procedure on a VSTAR 1100 without one of those filter relocation kits, discussing some of the reasons why I opted NOT to get this kit; Showing some of the advantages that can be had while only adding 10 extra minutes to the job. This begins with the removal of my front cylinder slip-on pipe, followed by the loosening of the floorboard on the right foot side. This was followed by the removal of the exhaust pipe off of the motor. I also remove the screw that holds the rear brake reservoir, this makes the job a lot easier.

With all of this removed, the whole side of the bike was able to be inspected . An 11/16 spanner and small hammer was used to break the tension on the screw of the oil pan and retightened after my custom roll-around was situated. While draining, I move to the filter. This starts with the outer chrome cover, keeping in mind the different sized screws removed, revealing the oil filter cover that pulls right out, exposing the filter. Having inspected and cleaned up everything and swapped the filter the filter cover is reinserted and the chrome cover is reapplied after the surrounding chrome areas of the bike are cleaned up. Ive taken this opportunity to clean up all of the hard to reach areas at this point as well as inspect the voltage regulator.

This is also where Ive decided to do a rear brake fluid flush in a separate video. Which is linked in this video.

The nut is re-tightened onto the pan after it is cleaned and it is tightened. I then treat the exhaust studs with anti-seize as I go through a sequence to re-mount the exhaust pipes, and then the rear brake reservoir. The wife assists with the final step, adding the oil, which is pretty straight forward but documented anyway. The important note is the level should be correct and the oil light should go out when you turn on the ignition and also when you turn on the bike.

I use Yamalube 10w40

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
While conducting an oil change on the bike Ive decided that now would be a good time to flush the rear brakes, by the looks of the fluid in the reservoir, having the exhaust pipe removed this is really easy. The fluid is definitely orange, so this will have to happen. I put a sample in a cap for closer inspection for the video. I already have a Harbor freight Brake fluid bleeder item number 92924 so this is an easy job. The procedure for the setup and task is explained in the video. Naturally I pull extra through to flush the caliper until the color of the liquid is clear.

The cap parts are cleaned before being re-introduced to the reservoir. Brakes are carefully tested before the bike is put back on the road!!!

If you are not qualified to do this, take it to someone who is.



Having finished flushing the rear brakes, with all of the equipment out, i'd decided to quickly inspect the front brake fluid and found that it too could use a flush as well. This follows a similar procedure to the rear brake except for the fact that once one caliper is used to flush the system, the second caliper must be done simply to flush that leg of the system as well.


Standard Harbor Freight Brake Bleeder is used Item number 92924


The cap parts are cleaned before being re-introduced to the reservoir. Brakes are carefully tested before the bike is put back on the road!!!

If you are not qualified to do this, take it to someone who is.



I hear about a lot of confusion with regard to the testing of the battery, charging system and voltage regulation, so i've decided to do a quick video about this. This requires a voltmeter. You should have one.

The first check is really simple, the check of the battery voltage itself in the rest position. Followed by the battery voltage when the ignition is turned on, showing that it will drop but can hold its own even with the draw, a draw that will later be measured.

Second is a demonstration of the running engine, demonstrating the functioning voltage regulator in play. Mine sits around up to 14v as expected regardless of engine RPM.

The next test required more caution so the key is removed from the bike and the ground from the battery is disconnected so that current can be measured across ground to check for any system leaks or unexpected current draws. I use my under tank light to demo what a leak looks like.

I use this time to demonstrate that the idle current is about 6 amps for a vstar. If I hit the starter I would have obviously blown out the meter. DONT HIT THE STARTER. DONT!!!!! DONT!!!!!!!

Putting everything back to normal and moving back to normal, I show how voltage drops as the starter turns. A healthy battery may jump down to low 11's. A bad battery may turn the engine, but not turn the engine and run the ignition at the same time.

Finally, there are other signs of failing charging systems on the road.... this is discussed as well.



Today we will be going through the complete troubleshooting of the fuel system of the VSTAR 1100, before paying a mechanic to do it. You might find you can isolate and repair the problem yourself. A link to a movie is provided with instructions for the removal of the rank and required items.

This test begins with the battery, ensuring proper function, without which, nothing electrical is expected to work properly. This is followed by a quick test of the fuel valve itself. Does it flow? DO YOU HAVE GAS? Happens more than you think.

Moving on, the side cover is removed to expose the pump, we can remove that cover and listen to hear if priming is attempted. The sound tells us much, A few tests based on this sound can allow us to see if there is a blockage or a faulty pump with good electrical flow. This includes removing the cover under the seat to expose the fuel filter for inspection and possible replacement.

If the pump wasn't making noise, other electrical components may be faulty too, we should start at the main fuse 30A under the seat, from there, the fuse box on the side has a 10A that should be checked, along with all of the others. With the fuses good a check for good starter operation should be done to rule out the kill switch or the side stand switch.

At this stage the ohm meter should be brought to the harness where the fuel pump is to measure the resistance of the pump motor, Finally, the fuel pump relay is removed from forward the carb area. This test is a bit tricky for some, as some folks may want to take this to a more experienced person or a shop for testing. This requires a separate 12v power source to energize the 12v relay with which the ohm meter measures the contact side of the relay.

The last piece of the circuit is the ignitor that can only be tested in a swap-out at a shop or dealership. A separate video link shows the tank re-installation. The only other issue could be an open wire in the system as a short would have blown a fuse.

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Today we will be going through the complete troubleshooting of the ignition system of the VSTAR 1100, before paying a mechanic to do it. You might find you can isolate and repair the problem yourself. A link to a movie is provided with instructions for the removal of the rank and required items. After the tank is removed the forward plastic trim is then removed. A spark testing tool is highly recommend for this job, found at any auto parts store.

This test begins with the battery, ensuring proper function, without which, nothing electrical is expected to work properly. The battery should be charged up, tested and if need be replaced before continuing. This is followed by testing the key switch function. horn and lights.

If the horn wasn't making noise, other electrical components may be faulty too, we should start at the main fuse 30A under the seat, from there, the fuse box on the side has a 10A that should be checked, along with all of the others. With the fuses good a check for good starter operation should be done to rule out the kill switch or the side stand switch.

The test in the video will be done with the rear cylinder, the front cylinder is the same process.

The chrome trim is removed from the engine cover. following the two wires from the coil, remembering their colour position. a reading is taken across the primary of the coil, looking for 3.57 to 4.83. The secondary through the 10k resistor of the cap should be 10.7k to 14.5k.

Next is the stator pickup, so the side cover is removed. the off white connector disconnected for this. reading the stator 189 to 231 is the nominal value. Next the wires on the coil is re-attached. With the meter on dc volts, on both of those leads and the key in the ignition in the off position. we check to see 0 volts, turning the key to on, we should see 12v.

Next, the spark gap tester , set to a gap around 6m is connected to the indication cable and grounded to the block. turning over the engine, checking for visual indication of spark. If spark is seen, the plug is then removed and inspected for fouling, rounding and damage, replaced if necessary.

If still no spark, on the connector that goes to the gas tank is a diode taped just under the connector. removing tape exposes this for removal. Testing on the meter as shown shows an indication only in one direction. Once tested it is reinstalled in place.

Next comes the start circuit relay, removed from the rubber mount as shown , pin 2-3 the diode is tested if forward and reverse.

If there is still a problem you will need to swap the ignitor for testing from a shop or friend, to see if this clears the issue.



Today we will be replacing the front brake pads on a Vstar 1100. This model is a Silverado, having two calipers up front the job is simply done twice. I will not be conducting it twice in the video. Note that on mine, having determined that my brakes are re-serviceable, I clean and replace all of the parts but do so as if they are all replaced as new items. Also be aware that after market brakes do not come with the extra springs and support pads, so if you are getting after market like EBC and want to replace these items, you will need to purchase them separately.

I also make sure before starting that I have a length of wire and a rag to support the caliper while disconnected so it is not hanging from the brake line.

Note my use of minimal anti-seize and small amount of grease in the dust caps is not called out in the official procedure, its just something I do.

Brakes should be bled tested adequately before operating the bike.




Today will be the maintenance of the rear brakes for the VSTAR 1100, For this purpose the saddle bags have been removed, also, the top slip-on exhaust pipe has also been removed.

My Pads are the EBC FA88HH, they do not come with the support pad that the OEM may come with this is PN 1WG-25919-00-00 The brake pedal should not be touched once the process begins.

I've had no success on my bike pushing in the piston with my fingers I describe another method in the video with channel locks. Note my use of minimal anti-seize is not called out in the official procedure, its just something I do. Brakes should be bled tested adequately before operating the bike.


 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Often asked about the pod kit setup on my bike I have some time to go through it due to a mechanical throttle issue. The Vstar simply cannot breathe in stock form and can greatly benefit from a pod kit. Years ago I'd picked up this kit, so Ill take the time to go through it, disassemble it, go through its installation, the modification of the carbs, the floats and the subsequent re-installation and balancing. With my kit I'd also purchased the longer Pilot screw this is highly recommended for the bike with or without a pod kit.


Its important to remember that the settings and jets are always recommendations, each bike is different and should be put on a dyno for a final assessment.


 
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