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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm considering a Yamaha V 250 as my first bike, with plans down the line for a 650 cruiser after I've gained experience and improved my skill.
Does anyone know if the V 250 has enough oomph to ride on the highway? I'm in NYC, and highway traffic moves anywhere from stop-n-go to 75.
 

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I wouldn't recommend it. While great at accelerating from a stop and riding at surface road speeds, interstate speeds are just too high for most engines that size.

The exception would be a couple of the sport bikes like the ninja 250 with higher-revving engines.
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, I thought that might be the answer.
A problem with NYC is that bridges and highways are pretty much the only way out of town.
I'll have to consider if I want to go to something larger for a first bike - something I'm reluctant to do until my comfort and experience levels are higher.
 

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Female Rider
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Have you checked out the Kawasaki Vulcan 500 or Vulcan 900? Both are really nice bikes, IMO. The 500 boasted of being a great starter bike. I really like the 900 too. Both have lower seat height and the 500 weighs less than 500 lbs. I don't know your size, but they might be something to consider. Good Luck with your search!
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #5
I rode for a while in high school (25 years ago), and haven't ridden since. I took the BRC a few weeks ago, and I've taken a few lessons since.
Even though I'd like a larger cruiser, I don't know how smart it would be to get a 900 to start, or even if the 500 would be too big, even though a cruiser is probably less likely to be too overpowered for me.
Thanks MONI. I'll check out some of the Vulcan 500s if they're for sale near me.
 

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A 500 or 900 cc twin isn't likely to be too much engine for a rider with some experience. I would be more concerned with weight toward the higher cc end.
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #7
I'll check out the larger bikes, with more of a critical eye towards whether or not I can handle it and less of an "oh my god, it's so cool!!!" attitude...
 

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If you like the cruiser type of bike and want a little more oomph, the Suzuki S40 might be worth a look. It's 650 single that'll give you more pulling power. It's also under 400 pounds, which is more suited toward a new rider. I don't know about NYC, but here there's a few dealers selling new old stock 2012 S40s at very reasonable prices. I thought about upgrading myself, but I like my TU250x for the standard seating position and don't have a need for freeway speeds.
 

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I second the S40. If I can ride it, just about anyone can. It's very light, but that does come with a price. If a large tractor trailer passes you on the highway, you feel it. Not enough to wipe most people out (I'm sure some have dumped it this way) but it could startle you if you aren't paying attention to traffic behind you. The only thing I don't like about the bike is in humid weather my hand seems to get stuck to the throttle grip. But I solved that problem by finding the right pair of gloves that don't stick to it. It annoys me when people come up to my bike and ask if its a Harley. Or you get the other type of people that say "maybe if you water it, it will grow" The later statement is likely to be responded by with my well known evil eye....
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
That's a good looking ride, Calculon! I'm going to see if I can set up a test ride for it.
I think I'm going to get overwhelmed with all the choices available!
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #11
I think my answer for the second will be "Beats riding in a cage...".
Thanks zippywonder
 

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Aging & Worn
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To recap............yes a 250 WILL run on a "highway," but "I" wouldn't do it unless I HAD to, for some unforseen reason. it just wouldn't have enough power to get you out of a tough jam fast enough, and you would come away from that ride on the highway, with chattering teeth and a buzz that would rival the best acid you could EVER take!! (spoken like a true "former hippie," eh?!)

-Soupy
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #14
you would come away from that ride on the highway, with chattering teeth and a buzz that would rival the best acid you could EVER take!! (spoken like a true "former hippie," eh?!)

-Soupy
Ha! Thanks Soupy. I don't know if that's quite the thrill I'm looking for. It sounds like something a few engine sizes up - 350 or 500 - might be the way to go, as long as it's not a torque monster that wants to buck me every time I let out the throttle.
I need the power to highway out of the city, but I still need to get something "new rider friendly". Time to go sit on a lot of bikes...
 

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Many of the bikes in the 500cc range are not huge power monsters. They are mostly nice tame light weight bikes with enough power to merge with traffic on the interstate. Almost any of the Japanese bikes in that engine size will be just fine for merging with rush hour traffic but will also be easily controlled and pretty darned reliable. I am considering restoring my 1981 CX-500-C Honda as a short trip bike for me while I keep my 1731cc Vision for touring duty. The smaller bikes are really a lot of fun, even for a long term rider like me.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thank you Oldman47. I'll probably go with a Japanese, unless I find a used Royal Enfield (I like the lines) that seems reliable.
 

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I've done it. It's pretty much like Soupy described. If you plan to ride in the interstate more than once, the V-Star 250 isn't a good choice.
 
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