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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a Yamaha Radian YX600 recently that came with a snapped clutch cable. I replaced the cable, but even with the cable adjusted way too tight the clutch refuses to disengage when I pull the lever. Looking for ideas on how to fix or at least diagnose the problem.


I Ordered a replacement clutch cable online that just came in today. So I went and installed it on the bike and luckily it seems to be the perfect length to reach the clutch linkage with 1/8" of freeplay with all the adjusters screwed in.

At this point I'm pretty excited to finally get to ride this thing around without needing to drop it in gear from a roll. So I start up the bike and let her idle to temperature. Take a seat, pop the kickstand up, grab a fist full of clutch lever, drop it into first, and - CLUNK - lurch to a stop.

"OK. No problem, probably just need to adjust the cable."

I spent the next 20 minutes tightening the adjusters a few turns at a time then rocking the bike back and forth with the clutch lever pulled to see if the clutch would disengage, but no dice. Even with all of the adjusters screwed out to the maximum, the clutch was still hooked solid. The lever on the crankcase was even at almost it's maximum travel, so it doesn't seem to be a cable issue.

I can think of plenty of reasons why the clutch might refuse to engage, but disengage? That's a different story. Here's all my ideas:
  • Some horrible mistreatment by the previous owner caused the clutch plates to fuse together.
  • The linkage in the case is in need of repair or adjustment.
  • The oil level is insufficient or too fouled (though I doubt this being the sole cause due to it not disengaging even at near max throwout).
I don't have a garage or I'd already have drained the oil and ripped the side cover off the engine to have a look. Figure I'll be building a shed very soon.

Anybody have clues on what might be wrong or things to look at first?


Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Update: I "fixed" it!

For the last couple of hours I've been digging through parts diagrams, service manuals, and different forums trying to figure out what could actually be wrong with the bike.

Was just turning up a lot of people that don't know how to adjust cables until I clicked on a YouTube video titled "Basics to Motorcycle Clutch Adjustment." I figured it'd just describe adjusting the cables for the 100th time, but worth a shot, right?

It did start out just going over cable adjustment, but eventually the guy mentioned that sometimes the clutch plates stick together after sitting for a long time and you need to pull the clutch in while rocking the bike back and forth in gear to unstick them!

This sounded exactly like my problem since the bike hadn't been used for a while by the previous owner, and while I did drive it around a couple times, I didn't have a clutch cable to use.

Did a search for sticky clutch plates and turned up a whole bunch of results, so it's apparently a pretty common problem. I'm only used to the single plate clutches you find in cars where the plates really have no choice but to separate when you press the pedal, so I never even would have thought they just be sticking to each other.

So here's the fix:
I moved the cable adjuster out a bit more to take up the slack and make sure I would get past the friction zone, then I put the bike in 2nd for more leverage and tried to force the bike to roll while squeezing the lever. It still wasn't budging, so I tried 3rd gear and Voila! - it freed right up!

Ended up taking it for a ride right after "fixing" it and everything worked great. Just have to chalk this one up to a rookie mistake. :)

Thanks to everyone that took a look. It's a little silly to answer my own thread, but hopefully this information helps out someone else down the line.
 

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It's a little silly to answer my own thread, but hopefully this information helps out someone else down the line.
No, it really is not silly to answer your own thread, and for precisely the reason you listed. So, thanks for taking the time to post what you found. :thumbsup:

Also, there are a lot of different bikes, and although they all have some things in common, they use a lot of different ways of approaching the same problems. So it's good to be able to learn about different fixes for different bikes.
 
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