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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. Just bought a bone stock '92 FZR 1000 from a collector that is damn near like new w/8k miles. All his bikes are kept inside various rooms of his house and he kept this one in his living room. It has all new fluids, but the tank, lines and carbs were all cleaned/drained after his last ride prior to storing it inside for the past year. I bought a new battery. Bike was shipped and arrived today, so I'll go out and tinker with it when I get some time this weekend. I have the factory shop service manual and will look at it, but figured I'd ask some questions here.


Is there a particular procedure I should follow in my attempt to get it back to running by adding fuel, etc.

As far at the fuel goes, will the carbs needs anything done to them before firing this thing? Just add fuel to the tank and crank (but not fire the motor); prime it so to speak?

Look for leaks? No leaks, fire it up and keep a close eye on things? Or should I just fill the tank, crank, let it gravity feed and then try to start it in a day or so? Thanks.
 

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Sweet bike.
For racing purposes, gas goes flat in two weeks. For street bikes, gas goes flat over the winter. Whether the carbs were drained or not, there is likely residue in the carbs. You could get lucky and it will run with fresh gas. i would drain all of the old gas out and install fresh stuff. With a good battery, check the spark, and then try and fire. If it runs, shut it off, change the oil, and check the compression. If you get 140 and up, go for a ride.

If it does not run, you may need to remove the carbs and clean them. It all depends how long it has been sitting.

UK
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. Like I said in my original post, all the gas was drained from the tank, lines and carbs. Carbs and lines were cleaned, and then bike went inside the house for almost a year. It has not been sitting with fuel in it. I'll install the new battery and put some fuel in it tomorrow, hope for the best and go from there.
 

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Even if the fuel is drained, it leaves a residue, kind of like varnish. The new fuel may remove it, maybe not. There are arguments for and against draining the carbs. I am generally on the draining side. Just be prepared to clean the carbs. They get plugged, even when the bike is run often.

If you get good at it, I have a set of carbs off an 81 XS1100 that need cleaning.

UK
 

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There's a very good chance that a simple application of some gasoline with a solvent will clean up any little residue left of the carbs were drained. I normally poo-poo Seafoam, especially for carbureted engines, but in your case, with carburators and a possible light varnish, Seafoam would likely do the trick.
Me, even if the fluids we claimed to have been changed before storage, I'd still change the oil after the first hundred miles or so, and I'd certainly flush the brake fluid, as that is a time, rather than distance maintenance item because it can absorb moisture. (It's also cheap and easy to do.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There's a very good chance that a simple application of some gasoline with a solvent will clean up any little residue left of the carbs were drained. I normally poo-poo Seafoam, especially for carbureted engines, but in your case, with carburators and a possible light varnish, Seafoam would likely do the trick.
Me, even if the fluids we claimed to have been changed before storage, I'd still change the oil after the first hundred miles or so, and I'd certainly flush the brake fluid, as that is a time, rather than distance maintenance item because it can absorb moisture. (It's also cheap and easy to do.)
Thank you. Never heard of Seafoam. What is it and where can I buy it? Just add a certain amount with the fuel and let it run its course until almost empty?
 

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You can get it at Walmart. Just go by the directions. Not the ones for the crankcase. Sweet bike. I had a 600 fzr back then same colors.
 

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Thank you. Never heard of Seafoam. What is it and where can I buy it? Just add a certain amount with the fuel and let it run its course until almost empty?
It's a solvent based engine cleaner... Often highly touted by ignorant people who watch too many YouTube videos of cars blowing white smoke after concentrated treatments with the stuff. it is mostly snake oil especially for modern fuel injected engines, especially compared to detergent based cleaners like Regain, Chevron Techron, Amsoil One Shot, etc.
The ONE thing that it DOES do well (better than the detergent based stuff) is it removes light varnish residue from carbureted engines, which is exactly what you're looking for.
 

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Two threads, same bike...
Cool, double the fun.

Berryman's B12 Chemtool liquid. I've seen it work on customers bikes.
It does a good job on parts that are immersed in fuel but of course it doesn't do anything for clogged air jets and such.
That's my job, clean the parts that B12 can't reach.
I use B12 Chemtool aerosol spray as a cleaner and to check that carb body passages are clear... Good stuff.

My only experience with Seafoam has been when a customer puts it in old bad fuel in the tank, so I pretty much got nothing on that stuff.
I do know it won't fix bad fuel though. Lol
 

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The seafoam also has stabilizer in it. I have had it fix an issue with a "dirty" carb before. It was running rough . After putting in the seafoam , it ran better. Then, i have also had times where it didn't help. I guess it depends on how bad the carb is. As mentioned above, i think it's more for a light varnish (and overrated). For a cleaner/stabilizer in one, it's worth a shot. Just dont expect miracles. I think it's a little expensive though.
 

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The seafoam also has stabilizer in it. I have had it fix an issue with a "dirty" carb before. It was running rough . After putting in the seafoam , it ran better. Then, i have also had times where it didn't help. I guess it depends on how bad the carb is. As mentioned above, i think it's more for a light varnish (and overrated). For a cleaner/stabilizer in one, it's worth a shot. Just dont expect miracles. I think it's a little expensive though.
I use MMO in all my vehicles for the gas tank and oil... just a little though. Strangely enough, only our newest vehicle ('12 CRV) shows a noticeable improvement in gas mileage...

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Report:

Bike hasn't been ridden and stored inside the living room for a year. Tank, lines, carbs were all drained/cleaned prior to putting in the living room. Brakes, engine fluids were changed/fresh at time of putting in the living room. Battery was removed.

Yesterday I installed a new battery, put 2-gals of fuel in it. I didn't let it sit overnight to gravity feed. Turned on ignition (sounded like it has an electronic fuel pump). Choked it, twist the throttle a few times and it took about 15-20 sec of cranking before it fired up. Fired up and everything sounded great - just like a sewing machine. I let it run for about 2 min while checking for leaks; no leaks. Shut it down and let sit, then checked for leaks; nothing. Idle seems a little low at around 900 rpm, and when I give it some initial throttle it stumbles until its over 1k rpm. Maybe pilot jets need looked at, but its not bad. Took it for a brief spin and its amazing how well it runs - it is seriously fast. It has now sat with fuel in it for 12-hrs so I'm going to go fire it up again to see if there is any difference, and also check for leaks.
 

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Report:

Bike hasn't been ridden and stored inside the living room for a year. Tank, lines, carbs were all drained/cleaned prior to putting in the living room. Brakes, engine fluids were changed/fresh at time of putting in the living room. Battery was removed.

Yesterday I installed a new battery, put 2-gals of fuel in it. I didn't let it sit overnight to gravity feed. Turned on ignition (sounded like it has an electronic fuel pump). Choked it, twist the throttle a few times and it took about 15-20 sec of cranking before it fired up. Fired up and everything sounded great - just like a sewing machine. I let it run for about 2 min while checking for leaks; no leaks. Shut it down and let sit, then checked for leaks; nothing. Idle seems a little low at around 900 rpm, and when I give it some initial throttle it stumbles until its over 1k rpm. Maybe pilot jets need looked at, but its not bad. Took it for a brief spin and its amazing how well it runs - it is seriously fast. It has now sat with fuel in it for 12-hrs so I'm going to go fire it up again to see if there is any difference, and also check for leaks.
You can look up the fuel tank on Yamaha's parts diagram. It shows an electric fuel pump and an inline fuel filter on the fuel line going to the carburetors.
The carburetors are the down draft type and mounted higher than most of the fuel in the tank so it has to have a fuel pump.
No gravity feed.

"Brakes, engine fluids were changed/fresh at time of putting in the living room"
Those fluids should be changed after sitting for that long... Water has formed in them.
 

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One of those Yamahas was at the bike gang meeting last Sunday. Probably the fastest bike there. Definitely faster than the side valve Triumph. There was a newer naked Triumph triple that would be quick, plus a 1200cc Thruxton Triumph. Then my Trophy 900 which is no slouch, and a bunch of other slower stuff, like a 750 Norton.

I will assume your bike is a more modern version of the original XS1100

UK
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
SemiFast, yes the fluids are getting changed. Question though. How on earth would water form inside those areas that are sealed and bike stored indoors in a climate controlled environment? I could see that if it was stored outdoors with weather changes throughout the year, etc.
 

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Dot 3 & 4 brake fluid absorbs water from the air.
Probable condensation in the crankcase contaminates the engine oil, even indoors.
 

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Humidity inside is often 50 to 60% In the really dry places it can be 35%, sometimes lower. But less than that and some folks will add a misting device.
Outside cold air drops, warm air rises. If it is around 80% humidity, a bike with a roof over it but no walls, will have no dew on it. Move the bike from under the cover, and it will get damp on all the top surfaces. At around 95% humidity a bike under a roof with no walls, will get a bit damp. It sneaks around corners. Bikes in an unheated shed can get damp over time in high humidity areas. A heat lamp should keep them dry.

But back to a bike inside. There is still a lost of moisture in the air at 50% humidity. Enough for some fluids to absorb the moisture. Folks in Phoenix to not need to read this.

UK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
SemiFast,

What Yamaha site are you talking about that I could see the parts diagram for the tank, or any other areas for that matter. Bike Bandit?

I bought the dealer Yamaha Factory Service Manual and it totally sucks (photos are horrible). Good thing I didn't pay the normal $80+ for it. I found a used Haynes on eBay, so hopefully it'll be better.

All the stuff on this bike looks like its brand new. Must've rode it in a bubble for 8k miles. Going to change the fluids and order some new tires and get to riding it (with care).
 
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