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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I may very well opt for a used bike of some sort to learn and practice on but regardless of whether it's new or used, would or has anybody purchased a mini motorcycle like a Grom, to learn to ride?
I won't be doing highway riding for an indefinite period of time, as I don't know how much time I'll get to spend practicing. So, a small motorcycle would be okay but I don't know if it would be a waste of money to buy something like that or get something a little bigger, like a 250, that may be a better bike to learn on. The prices are basically the same and I'd be able to re-sell either. Not really knowing the difference in the way they feel, I don't know how much different it would be to go from something like Grom to a full sized motorcycle, so I wonder if riding something bigger at first is a better way to learn to handle a motorcycle. I know that training courses don't use mini bikes.
 

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A Grom would be a fun way to get in to streetbike riding on city streets and rural roads and would be good practice for making the step to a larger bike.:grin:

I had a 170 mph Superbike at the same time I had a 50cc Yamaha Zuma and a 125cc Yamaha scooter and for my 11 mile one way commute to work it was ideal as about 9 miles of that is on country roads.:smile:

Sam:nerd:
 

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On The Road Again!
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Waaay back in 1968, I started out on a used Honda 90. I rode the heck out it for about a year, then started moving up to bigger bikes.
Mils, I don't know where you live since you didn't fill out your profile, (hint hint) but if you live in a city, that Grom might be ideal.
On the other hand, if you live in an area with nothing but highways, that small bike will become a liability very quickly.
 

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Lots of people start on little bikes, or scooters, etc. They are great!!! The important part is, you're riding. A guy in my safety class had a really cool Italian scooter that he was getting endorsed for. l have also heard about people starting on full dress Harleys, so to each their own.

l am definitely a believer in buying a used bike in good working order. 250 Ninjas and 250 Rebels are common, solid starter bikes that can often be had for a couple grand or less. If you drop it...and chances are, you will...it doesn't sting like dropping a new $10,000 machine
 

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I started on a 125 cc scooter that I rode for 10 months then I got a 500 cc naked street bike that I rode for a little over a year. Then I got out of motorcycling for quite some time but just got back into it last October and am now riding a 2018 Honda CB500F.

I'd go sit on a Grom and then the other motorcycles you're considering. I wouldn't have any problems recommending a Grom to start on but just make sure it fits you okay. I sat on one last year and felt really cramped on it due to my long legs. The handlebars actually hit my knees on sharp turns. But it's a really light bike and very easy to handle so it wouldn't be intimidating at all for a beginner. They're also very popular so if you decided you wanted a full-sized motorcycle after a bit it would be easy to sell.

Nothing wrong with scooters either. Many of them are the same size and weight as a motorcycle so you can get used to the feel and can also learn how to navigate your way through traffic on them, too. Good luck and ride safe!
 

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I suggest you get whatever you are comfortable with. It does you no good if it sits. So if a Grom fits you well then go for it. Believe it or not, some people prefer scooters and there are some that can do highway miles all day long. So get something you'll actually want to ride. I started on a little 185 Honda Twinstar. And it scared the heck out of me. But it also taught me a lot more than a bigger bike would have. Because I learned to get every ounce of power out of it. Took what I would call some big trips with it. Like 1,000+/- miles over a 3 day weekend. But you can't learn if you don't try. Give it a go. We are here to help if we can.
 

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I agree with the others, nothing wrong with starting out on a small bike. But like Hog said, go with something you're comfortable on and enjoy riding and can keep up with street traffic. I had lots of practice as a kid on a 3.5 HP Briggs & Straton powered mini bike, but that didn't teach me clutch and shifting coordination. So my first real bike was a smaller 1970's Kawasaki 250 enduro street/trail bike that did. I think the majority of riders start out on smaller bikes.
 

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I did not get mine to impress anyone so I suggest the same. If that's what you want, get it. Certainly dont get a 1200 pound bike if you don;t feel like you are ready for it. I will make a prediction that you will progress faster than you think. If you have a small one you can have one that your kids can learn on too, if you have any. I'll also predict that a smaller one will cost way less and you won't loose as much if you change your mond.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After my recent experience and the fact that I have NOBODY in the world to help me buy a used bike, I'll never buy anything used again! Motorcycling isn't a solitary hobby for nothing. There isn't a motorcycling soul in the universe who would help me, even after offering to pay, and I got scammed out of money I couldn't afford to lose.
 
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