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I put this in the Building forum, because I made some of the parts.

I was reading a book about the history of Harley Davidson, and one chapter talked about how the test riders would add windscreens and sidecars for winter, and keep on riding, come cold come snow, so this year I decided to add certain items to my bike specifically for winter. Today I installed a windshield, a pair of handlebar muffs, and some lower covers that attach to my engine guard.
Here's a before picture:

The engine guard was the first thing I put on the bike, and it's already proven it can save the bike and myself from damage when I had a low speed, black ice incident last winter.
Having a good strong bar like this really takes a lot of stress out of no speed handling, in my opinion. If you're pushing it around and stumble, and you feel like you need to drop the bike, you know you can drop it without hurting anything. I prefer paint to chrome, because I can fix paint, I can't fix chrome.
After adding the winter garb, it definitely loses some cool, but that was the idea.

The windscreen was just $40 on Amazon including shipping, and although the handlebar clamps work, they aren't adequate to prevent bouncing or resist the torque due to wind load at higher speeds. I added some formed aluminum struts to the fork clamp bolts, which stiffen it up nicely. The screen is a bit smaller than I'd prefer, but it's something.

The muffs I got from a seller in China via Ebay for less than ten bucks. They lace on around the controls. If you haven't memorized which is the high beam switch and which is the kill switch, you don't want these on your bike.
I had seen pictures of old military bikes with simple flat covers attached to their crash bars, so I figured I'd try making a set.

I cut them from some .050 sheet aluminum, drilled some holes, and nylock strapped them to my engine guard. Not much for style, and a bit of a barn door, but should keep some of the wind blast off my legs.

Does anybody else add accessories for winter only.
 

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American Legion Rider
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All good items for winter riding. The windscreen and crash bar good all the time as far as I'm concerned. But that's me.
 

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My winter bikes are the XS1100 with a side car, and the XS400. The 400 has a front window, leg guards like your but not as big, saddle bags that are plastic ammo cases, and a rear top box. The ammo cases used to be steel. I switched them last week. All the batteries are connected to battery tenders. Just thunked. I have a tank bag for the gloves, usually at least three pairs.

UK
 

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If you dress properly, you will be amazed at just how comfortable you'll be, even when it gets COLD. I have a windshield and lower deflectors on my Suzuki C50. I went out for a 25 mile ride this morning with temps in the 40's wearing a light jacket. The only place I felt the chill was on my lower legs, and I have been thinking of adding some engine-guard deflectors, as well. I don't want to ride on snow and ice -- not much chance of that in these parts -- but if it's sunny and dry the cold doesn't stop me from riding that bike.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Yeah, but dressing like the Michelin man is not a comfortable feeling to begin with. Sure, you might be warm, but now you can't move. :oops: :oops: :oops:
 

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Moderator - Like a crazy cat lady but with bikes!
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I usually have a scooter for a winter steed. Windscreen and the large wind deflecting fairings. Pair to warm clothes and it's a blast! Though at the end of last winter I realized it wasn't entirely necessary. Seems I'm comfortable with simply dressing up like the Michelin Man. Rode my naked Goldwing through 20-30 degree weather without issue. :)
 

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Yeah, but dressing like the Michelin man is not a comfortable feeling to begin with. Sure, you might be warm, but now you can't move. :oops: :oops: :oops:
"Proper" clothing does not necessarily mean "bulky" clothing, though. Typically, I will wear long underwear, heavy-duty jeans, a light sweater, and an insulated policeman's riding jacket, heavy socks and lightweight insulated lace-up boots, insulated gloves. This outfit is quite comfortable for riding or walking and is good well down in to the 30's. If it's colder, I add a pair of insulated bib overalls, and even then mobility is not a problem -- but I'm stripping those off as soon as I walk in to a restaurant for lunch, as they start getting toasty right quick in heated spaces!
 

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American Legion Rider
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But what's warm for you may not be warm for the next guy. Like old farts like me that can't get warm once I get cold. I have my stove fired up now and it's only 33º. I'm dreading going out and collecting eggs but it's time. Wind is howling...take that back, we are down to 30º.

 
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