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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A recent study was done to find out why Millennials don't ride motorcycles:

1. Pants won't pull up far enough for them to straddle the seat.

2. Can't get their phone to their ear with a helmet on.

3. Can't use 2 hands to eat while driving.

4. They don't get a trophy and a recognition plaque just for buying one.

5. Don't have enough muscle to hold the bike up when stopped.

6. Might have a bug hit them in the face and then they would need emergency care.

7. Motorcycles don't have air conditioning.

8. They can't afford one because they spent 12 years in college trying to get a degree in Humanities, Social Studies or Gender Studies for which no jobs are available.

9. They are allergic to fresh air.

10. Their pajamas get caught on the exhaust pipes.

11. They might get their hands dirty checking the oil.

12. The handle bars have buttons and levers and cannot be controlled by touch-screen.

13. You have to shift manually and use something called a clutch.

14. It's too hard to take selfies while riding.

15. They don't come with training wheels like their bicycles did.

16. Motorcycles don't have power steering or power brakes.

17. Their nose ring interferes with the face shield.

18. They would have to use leg muscle to back up.

19. When they stop, a light breeze might blow exhaust in their face.

20. It could rain on them and expose them to non-soft water.

21. It might scare their therapy dog, and then the dog would need therapy.

22. Can't get the motorcycle down the basement stairs of their parent's home.
 

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Some millennial weather phobics think internal combustion engines are evil & cause polar bears to die. When I was 10 I took apart a lawn mower engine & put it back together just to see what it looked like inside. Engines are still fascinating to me. Millennials would rather store pictures of food on their smart phones. More interested in Chinese solar panels.
 

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On The Road Again!
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Some millennial weather phobics think internal combustion engines are evil & cause polar bears to die. When I was 10 I took apart a lawn mower engine & put it back together just to see what it looked like inside. Engines are still fascinating to me. Millennials would rather store pictures of food on their smart phones. More interested in Chinese solar panels.
LOL!! More good ones!
 

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I saw the so called toughest Folks and lots of sissies melt into jello when they met their Drill instructor in basic training/ boot camp:smile_big:

When I went through the experience though, in August 1966, the drill Sarge from HELL wasn't politically correct like I understand they are now:grin:

There would be a lot of these young snowflakes leaving with their panties in a knot, holding their dishonorable discharge papers and crying back to Grandma and Grandpa for emotional and financial support:crying:

Oh the memories of an odd time that I wish I could share with these babies.:wink2:

Sam:nerd:
 

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I saw the so called toughest Folks and lots of sissies melt into jello when they met their Drill instructor in basic training/ boot camp:smile_big:

When I went through the experience though, in August 1966, the drill Sarge from HELL wasn't politically correct like I understand they are now:grin:

There would be a lot of these young snowflakes leaving with their panties in a knot, holding their dishonorable discharge papers and crying back to Grandma and Grandpa for emotional and financial support:crying:

Oh the memories of an odd time that I wish I could share with these babies.:wink2:

Sam:nerd:
Porky, boot camp was still creating men or weeding out the weak in what "progressives" would now call inhumane ways, when I joined in 1974. The first guy who jumped fence in the middle of the night was a high school football hero. The military teaches warrior hopefuls how to handle humility and adversity. Anyone who cannot, doesn't have any place defending our country. Man or Woman. I loved the challenge. Instead of whimpering about doing extra push-ups when someone F-'ed up, I enjoyed the extra exercise. Besides, I began to grow fond of being referred to as a "worm" or "maggot". :)
 

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I saw the so called toughest Folks and lots of sissies melt into jello when they met their Drill instructor in basic training/ boot camp:smile_big:

When I went through the experience though, in August 1966, the drill Sarge from HELL wasn't politically correct like I understand they are now:grin:

There would be a lot of these young snowflakes leaving with their panties in a knot, holding their dishonorable discharge papers and crying back to Grandma and Grandpa for emotional and financial support:crying:

Oh the memories of an odd time that I wish I could share with these babies.:wink2:

Sam:nerd:
We did not have boot camp in NZ when I enrolled. My 2 brief stints were on the range, and playing silly buggers in the jungle. Plus a little basic stuff in college. What we had was rugby. I started in the 15th B. If you progress 1 grade per year until you hit the 1st division, you can roughly figure out how old I was when I started.

The NZ guys who went to Vietnam, were regulars and volunteers on standby, mostly artillery guys.

UK
 

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Nightfly
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I saw the so called toughest Folks and lots of sissies melt into jello when they met their Drill instructor in basic training/ boot camp:smile_big:

When I went through the experience though, in August 1966, the drill Sarge from HELL wasn't politically correct like I understand they are now:grin:

There would be a lot of these young snowflakes leaving with their panties in a knot, holding their dishonorable discharge papers and crying back to Grandma and Grandpa for emotional and financial support:crying:

Oh the memories of an odd time that I wish I could share with these babies.:wink2:

Sam:nerd:
Looking back it was a damn incredible experience. I went through basic training one year ahead of you. August 1965, Fort Jackson, South Carolina. Best shape of my life and learned a hell of a lot. I know nothing of basic training today but it was damn tough back then, getting ready for Nam.
 

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Like you TR, I went thru in 1965. Ft Dix. Funniest thing I ever saw was a kid in my Company that wanted to know if we were going to be doing any training that day because it was raining. Everybody got to do 20 pushups for that, except him. He was real popular for a couple of days. The one thing that the Military taught me that is lacking in the kids today is to not give up. You can see the job thru even if you have to pull from your inner strength. I wonder if these kids can go 3 days and 3 nights with no sleep and KNOWING somebody is out there trying to kill you.
 

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Nightfly
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Because of the heavy drafting at the time, there were no barracks available when I was in. We lived in 7 man tents. Which in a way was better because we never had to keep care of a barracks and all the bs associated with it. Of course Columbia South Carolina was just a bit hot in August. When the temperature was over 90 we were allowed to "unblouse" our trousers.

Three days and nights with no sleep? Are you kidding? They can't go one hour without their phone. The kids who volunteer today are good kids, they do an impossible job without much support. I'm not impressed whenever someone says to me "thank you for your service." Ok, what did you do? Most have no idea about being in the rain for days without end, Dry clothes only a dream. Walking and falling in the mud, going out on night patrol praying like hell you'll make it back to base camp. You grow up fast and learn what true respect is.

Ok, now what was the OP talking about? Oh yeah, why Millennials don't ride motorcycles.
 

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See #6 , TR. It relates. And yes, 3 days and 3 nights with no sleep. Although I might have had an hour sleep. Don't remember.

Millennial's and motorcycles? My grandson has a 350 something or other. My son and I work on our own bikes. He takes his to the shop to have the oil changed. Different world, I guess.
 

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On The Road Again!
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I would suspect many boys aren't riding now because they don't know how and there is no father around to show them how to ride and how to maintain a motorcycle. Mothers and those that don't ride were always the ones to say "Those things are dangerous!"
In my family, it was the opposite.
My father was completely opposed to me having a bike.
My mother stood up for me and even went with me to
buy it and bring it home.
 
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