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2005 Suzuki Boulevard C50
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I did it again tonight! I fell down for my 8th time now!!! I’ve only been riding for maybe 6 months or so and have fallen down 8 times now and I can’t figure out why I keep falling? I feel like I’m a good rider I really do but for some reason I keep falling down.! Tonight I was driving around a gas station store and a car came around the other side kinda fast so I guess I pulled the front break while making the turn and like always I was on the ground! I must have the best luck ever because I have never been seriously injured actually in all but one of my falls I’ve jumped back up and rode off with out a scratch on my body! I’m just confused on why I keep falling down? If anyone has any ideas on why I’d love to hear them. Thanks in advance!
 

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Every time you get on your bike, think to yourself "I've only been doing this for 6 months, I'm still learning." Because it really makes no difference how many months or years you ride, you're always going to learn something.

My son has a 2020 Harley Low Rider that sits in my shop because it is un-rideable right now. I think a lot of the reason is his attitude. He thinks he's a great rider, just ask him, but the evidence says otherwise. I don't know how many times he has laid it down.

Not saying this is your problem, but it is up to you not to develope that kind of attitude.
 

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You already know the problem -- you're using front brake when the wheel is turned at slow speed, a 100% guarantee you're going down unless you have the reactions and strength of Superman. Concentrate on using rear brake only when maneuvering at slow speed. Even straight-ahead stops go better if you ease off the front brake as you go completely to rear just before the bike stops. That way, slight front-wheel displacement won't dump you at the stop, and you'll stay a lot more stable during the entire maneiver.
 

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Well I did it again tonight! I fell down for my 8th time now!!! I’ve only been riding for maybe 6 months or so and have fallen down 8 times now and I can’t figure out why I keep falling? I feel like I’m a good rider I really do but for some reason I keep falling down.! Tonight I was driving around a gas station store and a car came around the other side kinda fast so I guess I pulled the front break while making the turn and like always I was on the ground! I must have the best luck ever because I have never been seriously injured actually in all but one of my falls I’ve jumped back up and rode off with out a scratch on my body! I’m just confused on why I keep falling down? If anyone has any ideas on why I’d love to hear them. Thanks in advance!
Too much motorcycle, not enough riding skills.

Get a small dirt bike and practice off road lots, you'll learn fast and get way better at crashing, guaranteed.
 

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Oh and feet forward floorboards instead of foot pegs (n) this is the kind of thing that has people using only the rear brake 90% of the time, stupid idea on any motorcycle, deadly idea on one you are trying to learn to ride on. It's why manufacturers sometimes resort to crazy stuff like linked front and rear brakes on huge bikes, they are trying to make up for an inherent rider inability to operate the rear brake and front brake in unison at all times. The footpegs and the location of the rear brake control on a motorcycle is possibly the most vital part of the motorcycles controls, if you can't ride the pegs and operate both brakes simultaneously you can't 100% control the motorcycle. Forward mounted floorboards on a 600+ pound motorcycle will have you waddling around attempting to use your feet to duck paddle, or riding the saddle and balancing through your butt cheeks until you stop and then it's time to panic drop the landing gear. In a perfect world you will be putting only your left foot down and keeping the right foot on the brake control. ... if you are crashing from too much front brake now, you're putting down both feet and you have lost control of the rear brake. (y) Learn to keep that right foot in control of the rear brake more and you will crash less.
 

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2005 Suzuki C90T
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There is nothing wrong with floorboards. All of this is just a learning and confidence AND paying attention to your surroundings. Consider every vehicle you see is about to do something stupid, and consider every curve and corner as someone stupid is about to come around it. In slow corners, I'll look for loose graven or dirt and make sure I don't touch the front brake if I see it, and I'll still be cautious if I don't. Also, Where you look is where you are going. In some of the free Texas online riders training videos, some of them show this. If you stare at a tree, that's where your going. When someone panic brakes in a slow curve, their eyes will always immediately go right to the ground in the direction they are turning seconds before the fall. So practice looking where you want to go and always look for a second path in case of stupidity.

Here's you somehting to help too. My former FIL has had to stop riding becuse he falls every time. He simply just won't put a foot down at a stop. (He's probably too high to even know he's stopping or riding) So he will just flop over sideways with nothing or nobody around. At least your steps ahead of him.
 

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2022 Suzuki Dr 650
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First off, dont feel bad broo. Drops happen to the best of us. At low speeds rear brake helps the bike upright, and front brake has the opposite effect. At low speeds, and always, throttle and clutch control are important. Also, thats alot of bike for a new rider. Maybe learn on something lighter? IMO.
 

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2005 Suzuki C90T
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My brother has the same bike except it's a 17. It probably isn't the best learning bike but it's far from being a bad bike. It's actually a good bike and should last you a long time. I was going to get one but knew I would move up to the 90 and one became available so I got it. An 05 so a big brother to yours.

I actually dropped mine once. I rode it into my shop to park it and was looking at things and completely forgot about dropping the kick stand. Luckily there was something there for the crash bar to sit on and it didn't go all the way.

A down the road projct for yours.......Some of these year models got out of the factory with not a lot of lube on the shaft splines, which results in a lot of rusty wear. Later on, consider pulling your shaft and cleaning and greasing both ends. It's not that bad of a job. I did mine in an evening then a morning. Probably 4 hours total.
 

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2021 CanAm Spyder RT
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Lots of good advice so far. I would add that routinely practicing braking by starting with the rear brake and then applying the front brake would make you a better rider. Using the rear brake shifts weight onto the front wheel making it less likely to lock up that front wheel if the rear is already being applied firmly. And at very low speeds, such as in a parking lot, try not to use the front brake at all. Also, at slow speed it is more of a challenge to be looking far ahead rather than down at the ground right in front of you. But keeping your focus toward the horizon will go a long way to keeping you upright on your bike. Practicing very slow riding is a very worthwhile activity. Anyone can twist the throttle and go fast. A skilled rider is one who can keep the bike upright without touching your feet to the ground at very slow speeds. Don't get too discouraged and just keep working at it and you will see real improvement (assuming your bike is mechanically okay).
 

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Parking lots anywhere are very dangerous! Not so much to life and limb but the slow speed crunches that can still cost lots of money.

Just remember to raise your legs up high as you fall slowly to the side so that you aren't squished underneath the bike!

Sam:)
 

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2005 Suzuki Boulevard C50
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have a Suzuki Boulevard c50 right now I actually just got it like 1 month ago I started riding on a 2005 kawasaki vulcan en 500 and most of my falls were on the vulcan… all but one of my falls have been at low speeds and thank god I have only got a few scrapes and bruises and I believe that has a lot to do with my leather jacket it’s kept my upper body from any injuries…. My Boulevard has crash bars and they work excellent I can’t believe how great they work protecting the bike!!! Up until about a week ago I felt really comfortable on my new bike but after my first fall on this bike I just don’t feel safe on it for some reason? I guess I knew it was because of too much front brake but I guess I needed to hear it from experienced riders to really understand it so I’m gonna really practice using only my rear brake when going slow speeds…. Thank you to everyone for all the great advice I really appreciate it!!!
 

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While being taught to drive tractor trailer, we learned the Smith System. One of the 5 keys is to "aim high in steering".

When entering any sort of parking lot, scan the entire area. Look for potential things that might make you suddenly stop. Keep watching for vehicle movement as the scene can change in an instant. If you're looking at the ground around you, you won't be able to keep scanning.

Plan where you want to go in the parking lot (or gas station), look for things that might get in your way and plan for it. And by all means try not to stop while your bars are turned.

One bad habit I recently got out of (I've been riding almost 50 years) is when I enter a parking area from the street, there's usually some sort of small concrete step, maybe an inch or two. I used to focus on that step to make sure I don't go up it too fast. My speed was slow and sometimes too slow so I had to speed up quickly once the front tire got over it. Very awkward.

Now I go over that "bump" at a normal speed while looking where I want to go. Much safer for me.
 

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2022 T120, V7lll Special
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Go on utube and check out a guy that goes by "motojitsu". Watch his slow speed training videos. He is very good and explains alot on the hows and whys of slow speed riding. I have been riding for almost 60 years and have recently been having trouble with slow speeds. A lot of it has to do with the heavy bike I got 3 years ago until I traded to something lighter. Also a lot of trouble came from lack of low speed riding skills that I really didn't need so much on former lighter bikes. Motojitsu's videos helped me a lot with developing my low speed riding skills. I had lost my confidence somewhat but with practicing slow speed riding and following his advice I am fine now.
kk
 

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2022 T120, V7lll Special
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I just looked up the specs on your bike. That bike is going to be a bit tough to handle at slow speeds to start with due to it's weight, wheelbase and especially the headstock angle. It is similar to the bike I had. It will take good slow speed skills to handle it at slow speeds. It should be very stable at speed though but a bit lazy at tighter turns. Good luck.
kk
 

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But don't give up because nobody is born a motorcycle rider it's an acquired skill, you have just not been riding the right motorcycles for one and you haven't had a mentor. Lessons are good, good minders or trainers can tell you what you are doing right and what you are doing wrong. Formation following an experienced rider is good too because they can set the pace appropriate to the conditions. :) Just keep riding 🐟
 
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