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Usually different motovlogers, people I work with, and the internet. Since they all say your main sitting position is leaning forward, and I don't have that great of a back for long periods of forward leaning.

Also haven't read it. Saw the post just before leaving to work, and currently on lunch.




Be aware that what feels comfortable in the showroom, while a bike is not moving, is COMPLETELY different from how a bike feels while riding it.

I find a cruiser position to be very hard on the lower back, once you are moving, and the wind is an invisible hand pushing you back into the seat, with the forces concentrated on your lower back (because on most cruisers the pegs are forward in varying degrees), and with highway speed winds creating enough force to become downright painful on the lower back. I also find that the cruiser position is less than optimal for precise control. This is even more critical for a new rider. There are plenty of neutral position bikes that not only offer better control, but they ARE easier on the back, on ALL rides, from short spins around the block, to day long rides.

MANY of the milder versions of sport bikes actually offer a more neutral position, and do not position a rider with much of their weight on their wrists on clip on handlebars. Researching each specific model will tell you this.

And to even consider buying a bike that you have stated you don't really care for the looks of? Big mistake, IMO. You want to be proud of your machine, and look forward to seeing it as you walk up to it before every ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #122 ·
Be aware that what feels comfortable in the showroom, while a bike is not moving, is COMPLETELY different from how a bike feels while riding it.

I find a cruiser position to be very hard on the lower back, once you are moving, and the wind is an invisible hand pushing you back into the seat, with the forces concentrated on your lower back (because on most cruisers the pegs are forward in varying degrees), and with highway speed winds creating enough force to become downright painful on the lower back. I also find that the cruiser position is less than optimal for precise control. This is even more critical for a new rider. There are plenty of neutral position bikes that not only offer better control, but they ARE easier on the back, on ALL rides, from short spins around the block, to day long rides.

MANY of the milder versions of sport bikes actually offer a more neutral position, and do not position a rider with much of their weight on their wrists on clip on handlebars. Researching each specific model will tell you this.

And to even consider buying a bike that you have stated you don't really care for the looks of? Big mistake, IMO. You want to be proud of your machine, and look forward to seeing it as you walk up to it before every ride.
It's not that I didn't care how it looks. It's that I was choosing my needs over the looks. I needed something for long rides, I was told Honda Shadow, which I find ugly, is good for that, while Ninja, which looks great, was terrible for that. I'm still conflicted because now people are telling me the opposite, so I'm just getting confused at this point.
 

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I'm still conflicted because now people are telling me the opposite, so I'm just getting confused at this point.
They really aren't telling you the opposite. It's just different for different people. Almost any bike can be made to be comfortable doing long distance but could get quite expensive to make it so. Off the showroom floor anything with a windshield will put you closer to distance travel. Wind just plain beats you to death without one. Some sportbikes with their small shield might work too but my personal opinion is you need a larger windscreen than most of them have. You really have to try several different styles to see which one works best for you. And even then you are likely to need or want to change something. Hit your dealerships and see which one feels best for you with test rides. It's best that you ride a bike in to talk test rides though. hint hint
 

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Discussion Starter · #124 ·
I guess it's possible for Kawasaki Ninja's to ride long distances. Watched this video
and the only complaint was his backside was hurting, but only around Arizona after riding from Florida, and sleeping I think twice. I'm not rich, so I don't plan to ride that far away that long, so it MIGHT be okay for me. At most, I think maybe on one day off I can ride 8 hours away one day, then 8 hours back the next. 8 is just a long example. Maybe 10, maybe only 4. But point is, I want to be able to go far away comfortably.
 

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I'm still conflicted because now people are telling me the opposite, so I'm just getting confused at this point.

Its like I explain all the time to people.. your bike choice will fall in a catagory like a pair of shoes will..
No one will feel the same wearing the same shoes, and your position on a bike is no different.
I suggest you visit a couple dealerships, and at the verry least sit on a few machines. This will yield you better results, and not have so many "opinions" to sort thru,
 

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2018 Kawasaki NINJA 650 ABS KRT
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They really aren't telling you the opposite. It's just different for different people. Almost any bike can be made to be comfortable doing long distance but could get quite expensive to make it so. Off the showroom floor anything with a windshield will put you closer to distance travel. Wind just plain beats you to death without one. Some sportbikes with their small shield might work too but my personal opinion is you need a larger windscreen than most of them have. You really have to try several different styles to see which one works best for you. And even then you are likely to need or want to change something. Hit your dealerships and see which one feels best for you with test rides. It's best that you ride a bike in to talk test rides though. hint hint
Oh, yes, you'll definitely need a larger windscreen.
Tire Wheel Land vehicle Vehicle Helmet

I had a National Cycle VStream touring windscreenN20110 VStream® Touring Replacement Screen for Kawasaki® EX300 Ninja
 

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Discussion Starter · #127 ·
No one around here has any Kawasaki Ninja 300's for sell, and the dealerships only have Kawasaki Ninja 400 at lowest. While I prefer to avoid the dealership if I purchase one, if I have to settle with one, what is the differences between the 300 and 400? Or is it JUST the speed?
 

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No one around here has any Kawasaki Ninja 300's for sell, and the dealerships only have Kawasaki Ninja 400 at lowest. While I prefer to avoid the dealership if I purchase one, if I have to settle with one, what is the differences between the 300 and 400? Or is it JUST the speed?
I've heard good things about the 400, but have never ridden one; I sat on one and it was slightly bigger than the 300. I might have ended up with a 400 instead of the 300. 2017 was the last year for the 300 in the US and the 400s had just come out. But there wasn't any aftermarket luggage yet for the 400 and that's a must-have for me, so I got lucky and my local dealer had that new 300 KRT with my name on it at just the right time. (y) :cool:

Here's the link to the NINJA 400 forum so you can find out everything you need to know and more.
Ninja 400 Riders Forum
 

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Discussion Starter · #129 ·
I've heard good things about the 400, but have never ridden one; I sat on one and it was slightly bigger than the 300. I might have ended up with a 400 instead of the 300. 2017 was the last year for the 300 in the US and the 400s had just come out. But there wasn't any aftermarket luggage yet for the 400 and that's a must-have for me, so I got lucky and my local dealer had that new 300 KRT with my name on it at just the right time. (y) :cool:

Here's the link to the NINJA 400 forum so you can find out everything you need to know and more.
Ninja 400 Riders Forum
Aftermarket luggage?
 

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Discussion Starter · #130 ·
We planned to go out of town to a store that would sell motorcycle gear this weekend, but then we realized, we can't find one on Google... Was going to get a helmet, jacket, etc. The basic requirements for an MSF course. But Google couldn't give us any results for any store. Anytime I searched 'motorcycle store', it kept giving me results like Walmart or Autozone.
 

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Open Google Maps, search for your town or city. I searched for Akron, OH:
Ecoregion Plant Slope Rectangle Biome


Click on the Nearby button and type in motorcycle gear.

If you can stand a trip to St Louis there's a Cycle Gear store there where you'll be able to try on helmets, gloves, jackets, and boots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #132 · (Edited)
Open Google Maps, search for your town or city. I searched for Akron, OH:
View attachment 70047

Click on the Nearby button and type in motorcycle gear.

If you can stand a trip to St Louis there's a Cycle Gear store there where you'll be able to try on helmets, gloves, jackets, and boots.
Yeah, the same thing happens. It tells me Walmart. Other than that, a Cycle Gear which is 3+ hours away in every direction. It's like I said earlier in the topic, southeast Missouri is unfair for anyone who wants to get into motorcycles 😣

Only two other places are Tractor Supply and O'Reilles, both places I never been to, but extremely doubt they have gear. But I also need to go to both for very different reasons anyway, so it doesn't hurt me to check them out later in the day. If they don't have gear like I suspected they didn't, it wouldn't be a wasted trip for other reasons.

EDIT: Nope. Tractor Supply had a type of helmet, but seemed more for dirt bikes.
 

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While I admire your determination to get gear prior to class, it really isn't necessary. The training site shouldl have a helmet you can borrow; verify this with the site (Have you reached them and signed up for a class yet?). If it doesn't have a face shield, then sunglasses or prescription eyewear is fine. A long sleeved shirt or any jacket will work, just so long as there's "no skin below the chin"; I run around doing riding demos in a long sleeved wicking shirt provided by the state. And jeans, hiking boots or any over-the-ankle footwear, and work gloves, Mechanix gloves, batting gloves, anything full-fingered with some grip.

The possibility exists that you may find during class that motorcycling isn't for you. And that's OK. By waiting to invest in gear until after completing the class, you won't find yourself stuck with it should you discover that you won't be needing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #134 ·
While I admire your determination to get gear prior to class, it really isn't necessary. The training site shouldl have a helmet you can borrow; verify this with the site (Have you reached them and signed up for a class yet?). If it doesn't have a face shield, then sunglasses or prescription eyewear is fine. A long sleeved shirt or any jacket will work, just so long as there's "no skin below the chin"; I run around doing riding demos in a long sleeved wicking shirt provided by the state. And jeans, hiking boots or any over-the-ankle footwear, and work gloves, Mechanix gloves, batting gloves, anything full-fingered with some grip.

The possibility exists that you may find during class that motorcycling isn't for you. And that's OK. By waiting to invest in gear until after completing the class, you won't find yourself stuck with it should you discover that you won't be needing it.
Haven't called because I haven't reached that step yet. Don't think there will be any classes anyway because don't they stop doing classes around this time of year?
 

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Aftermarket luggage?
Yes, you can see it in the two pictures above that I posted from the Dragon. I got it at Revzilla; Twisted Throttle also has a lot of options. I don't see the side cases I had anymore, but it looks like there might be some better options. Mine were "semi-soft" so you HAD to put covers over them if you were in more than a sprinkle. They worked, but hard cases are infinitely better. With all the options that there are, you're better off calling either Revzilla or TT to find out exactly what you would need for whatever bike(s) you're interested in.
MOTORCYCLE LUGGAGE
Motorcycle Luggage & Bags - RevZilla
 

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Haven't called because I haven't reached that step yet. Don't think there will be any classes anyway because don't they stop doing classes around this time of year?
We run classes until the second weekend of November.

In my professional opinion, you ARE at that step. The next and most important step to take is to get professional training. You don't need a bike for that. You don't need to buy any motorcycle-specific gear for that, unless the site doesn't provide helmets. I'm beginning to wonder if you really want to do this. If you really don't, that's perfectly OK; no one says that you have to ride a motorcycle. If you do, then stop dragging your feet and get into a class ASAP. If you're still unsure, then take a class to find out if it's for you or not before you spend all kinds of money on a new venture that you may not really like after all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #137 ·
Yes, you can see it in the two pictures above that I posted from the Dragon. I got it at Revzilla; Twisted Throttle also has a lot of options. I don't see the side cases I had anymore, but it looks like there might be some better options. Mine were "semi-soft" so you HAD to put covers over them if you were in more than a sprinkle. They worked, but hard cases are infinitely better. With all the options that there are, you're better off calling either Revzilla or TT to find out exactly what you would need for whatever bike(s) you're interested in.
MOTORCYCLE LUGGAGE
Motorcycle Luggage & Bags - RevZilla
No I mean I never heard of Aftermarket luggage. Didn't know if it was a term, a different name for saddle bags, or what.
 

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Discussion Starter · #138 · (Edited)
We run classes until the second weekend of November.

In my professional opinion, you ARE at that step. The next and most important step to take is to get professional training. You don't need a bike for that. You don't need to buy any motorcycle-specific gear for that, unless the site doesn't provide helmets. I'm beginning to wonder if you really want to do this. If you really don't, that's perfectly OK; no one says that you have to ride a motorcycle. If you do, then stop dragging your feet and get into a class ASAP. If you're still unsure, then take a class to find out if it's for you or not before you spend all kinds of money on a new venture that you may not really like after all.
As for this part, I thought I still needed the gear which is what I've been saving up for. I also don't know if I need the permit before a course or not. And finally, I want to be able to afford a bike first, so that if I pass the MSF course, I don't have to wait a year before I get another chance to ride a bike (I doubt it'll be a year to save up, but it'll still be a few months. Only have $2000, and some of that was going to gear). Also, how much do MSF courses costs?

Then of course I don't even know if there's one around me, or if my car can even make it too far, but that is mostly the phone shyness in me. I don't plan to call until I have money ready to get a bike within a month of doing the course, and after that would just be the phone shyness holding me back.
 

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As for this part, I thought I still needed the gear which is what I've been saving up for. I also don't know if I need the permit before a course or not. And finally, I want to be able to afford a bike first, so that if I pass the MSF course, I don't have to wait a year before I get another chance to ride a bike (I doubt it'll be a year to save up, but it'll still be a few months. Only have $2000, and some of that was going to gear). Also, how much do MSF courses costs?

Then of course I don't even know if there's one around me, or if my car can even make it too far, but that is mostly the phone shyness in me. I don't plan to call until I have money ready to get a bike within a month of doing the course, and after that would just be the phone shyness holding me back.
You'll have to call them to find out about whether a permit is required or not.

You'll have to call them to find out how much it costs.

You'll have to call them to find out what the dates are. If you decide to wait until spring, that's fine, but you had also better find out when they will post the classes for 2022 because if it's anything like here, the spring classes will be full in no time flat.

Excuses, excuses, excuses. I'm too shy to call. My car might not make it. You know what? When you ride a motorcycle, there's no room for excuses. There is far more risk involved than driving a car and it's the rider's responsibility to manage those risks the best he can in order to stay alive out there. That requires using good street strategies, being well-practiced in emergency manuevers, and being able to make decisions NOW. The class will teach you all about those street strategies and the basic riding skills and emergency maneuvers. But we can't teach you how to make decisions. Your safety depends solely on YOU. I had two drivers try to take me out today within the first hour of my ride. I was halfway through a four-way stop and a gal on the right started to pull out in front of me. I did a quick stop just as she woke up. A little later I was passing a mini-van on a two-lane in a safe passing zone and it was crowding the dotted line. I was flashing my passing lights, sounding the horn, and hitting the gas while staying as far left as I safely could. That's the reality you risk facing on EVERY. SINGLE. RIDE. You need to make up your mind whether that's something you can handle or not (with proper training and practice) before you even bother to pick up that phone.
 
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