Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
I just got a 2000 Suzuki Bandit 1200S. Obviously I know I should warm up the bike from a cold start when the bike has been parked overnight. But let's say I take the bike out and park somewhere for a short while, maybe an hour or two. Do I need to warm up the engine again when I'm ready to resume riding? Or is it not necessary because it's still warm from the previous ride? Generally speaking, after a ride, how long can the bike sit parked, turned off, before needing to be warmed up again? I looked and looked but was not able to find a clear answer on this anywhere.
Thanks in advance and ride safely!
 

·
Save them all!
Joined
·
4,278 Posts
I usually only worry about it the first start of the day, and I really only warm it up a minute or two - only until the bike will run somewhat smoothly. I do take it easy for the first 10 minutes of riding or so, but I'll get it rolling down the road as soon as I can.

If the bike has already been running that day it's probably good to ride before I get my glove on.
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
10,009 Posts
--

The surest way to "wear out" an engine's parts is for them to rub together without oil. With good oil (preferably synthetic) of the right multi-range temperature spread, the parts have a coat of oil already on them from being run previously. Then when started, will use this abrasive resistant coating to protect the engine surfaces for several rotations until new oil is pumped in to that position. Therefore, it is not necessary to ever actually "warm up" an engine other than to help get the carburetor atomizing correctly.

When starting a long sitting engine, it is probably good to run at lower rpm's for several blocks by which time the oil pump will have fully pushed oil through all the passages. But that can be done by a gentle take off. The oil itself will warm faster by putting some work on the engine than if it is just let idle until fully up to prime operating temperature. In other words, just revving a cold engine when first started is not good.

--
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,623 Posts
Moroso has long made a device called and oil accumulator, 1.5 quarts or 3 quarts. My brother had one installed on his little foreign race car, he love it. It connected to the pressure side of an engine oiling system. When the engine is running oil pressure forces reserve oil into the accumulator and compresses the air ahead.

Should the pressure suddenly drop due to hard acceleration, braking or cornering, the air pressure immediately sends oil to the main galleries. When danger is past and the pump is once again primed with oil, pressure forces oil back into the Accumulator. It can also manually pre-lube the engine before start-up to prevent cold start scuffing and premature bearing wear. My brother swore by it on those cold starts.
 

·
Ace Tuner
Joined
·
3,772 Posts
Hello all,
I just got a 2000 Suzuki Bandit 1200S. Obviously I know I should warm up the bike from a cold start when the bike has been parked overnight. But let's say I take the bike out and park somewhere for a short while, maybe an hour or two. Do I need to warm up the engine again when I'm ready to resume riding? Or is it not necessary because it's still warm from the previous ride? Generally speaking, after a ride, how long can the bike sit parked, turned off, before needing to be warmed up again? I looked and looked but was not able to find a clear answer on this anywhere.
Thanks in advance and ride safely!
Siting for two hours on a HOT day the engine will still be warm enough so that you only need to run the bike long enough to be sure the oil has time to completely circulate the system.
After two hours on on a COLD or COOL day... do your cold start up procedure.
(If the motor is too hot to touch, warm enough. Cool to the touch, do the warm up).

The reason we should warm-up our bikes (or any engine) is so the internal parts, like pistons, have time to expand to the correct clearances.
Many of today's motorcycle engines have 'coated' cylinder walls instead of steel liners so cold clearances can be much closer than those with steel liner cylinders.
Even with the coated cylinder wall engines a warm-up is still recommended because clearances throughout the engine are not ideal (or close to ideal) until up to running temp.
Cold oil in the engine is another good reason to do a cold start warm-up. Hot oil flows easily. Cold oil, not so much.


But, a Word of Caution.

Do not let the bike sit idling while you go inside to drink coffee for 10~15 minuets or you could come back to a melted motorcycle.

A warm-up before you ride is important but don't overdo it. :thumbsup:
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,623 Posts
--

But few folks are going to pay $200. for that protection on a bike. Maybe would be good for a high value vehicle that you can't take time to warm up by easy riding.

--
You may be right Ron, I don't know. I wouldn't consider $200 too high a price to pay for start up engine protection, if I felt it was necessary, which I do not. But it is an option that is out there.
 

·
SUPER MODERATOR
Joined
·
9,328 Posts
You got some very good info but I'll tell you another good way on a COLD 'Air cooled' engine::smile_big:

Let it run for maybe a minute or two and then, reach down and FEEL a cylinder and If it's warm to the touch you are ready to go:smile_big:

One a bike with a water cooled engine, the thermostat will restrict coolant flow when cold to allow a quick warm up but it is still wise to wait a few minutes:wink2:

On an already warm engine, wait maybe 30 seconds and then SCOOT:smile:

Your Bandit 1200 is bulletproof so enjoy:grin:

Sam:nerd:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top