Motorcycle Forum banner

41 - 60 of 72 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,117 Posts
10 years ago when I started motorbiking, my first bike was a 2006 Hyosung GV250 fuel injected. I did nearly 25,000 km/16,000 miles in 20 months on it. Good, cheap bike, great around town, had trouble passing cars at 100 km/hr (60 mph) out on the open road without a bit of a run up, maxed it out at 135 km/hr (85 mph) down a slight hill with a tail wind. Had great fun on that bike, called her GLORIA after the song by Van Morrison, fitted small saddlebags to her and went everywhere on her that was tar sealed (asphalted), comfortable seat for 400 km/250 miles.

I'd recommend something like her to a learner, other 250 cc cruisers and Suzuki GN250 type bikes, the 250 is a good size to learn on, don't lose a lot of value when resold. Light so a learner doesn't let it fall too often in car parks, easy to pick up if you do, nippy enough but restrained enough to keep you out of trouble.
 

·
Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
Joined
·
11,619 Posts
I started this time around on a 650 classic. Good looking bike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
My first bike was a 1973 Honda SL 100, slightly used in 1973. Was a great first bike for me because it was too slow for me to get really stupid on so, I'm alive today. I was a stupid adrenaline junkie in my teens. By the time I could afford something that would do 175+ I no longer wanted it. Also the Honda weighted 200 lbs dry so it was easy to maneuver riding in the dirt & that carried over to riding on the street. That's why I don't care for bikes where you sit like a car & drive like a car but, just my preference. One note on low end torque; all my friends rode 2 strokes & left me in their dust but they would stall going up steep hills. My little Honda just chugged on up if I barely cracked the throttle. Below idle speed, you could count the little thumps. Durable bike, only problem was I sheared off kick start & it was impossible to rejet after putting on a clamp-on foam filter. Tried a dozen combinations & never ran past 1/2 throttle so I put the factory air box (10 pound sheet metal rat maze) back on the carb. Slide carb, not a CV. Oh, highway? Nope. Saw an indicated 73 with my nose on the tank & rear sprocket change but the slightest incline or wind had me down to 50+. I believe dirt bikes 250cc & under are great first bikes.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
107 Posts
My first bike was an old trail 80 bike. Honda? Suzuki? I don't remember. My first "big boy" bike was a 77 kz650. No I don't recommend either one, even if you could find one fixable.

Sent from my SM-S120VL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
My first before bike was a 1980 Honda 200cc twinstar. I would recommend it as a good starter bike because of the low seat height and low power and it's light making it easy to handle. However it was a bike I quickly grew out of and definitely not a bike to take on the freeway.

Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
My first bike is a 2010 Honda Stateline..
I've had it for two and a half years..
And I usually ride it in city traffic!
I love the bike.

Sent from my ALP-L29 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
My first bike was and still is Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic. Great starter bike. It is not expensive. It is mid-size. It has more than enough power. It is very easy to handle. It is very reliable and straight forward from maintenance perspective. It is an overally good bike with no issues. The only thing that may cause issues is a stator, but I believe only a couple of model years (2006-2008) had this problem. New models don't have it. I would definitely recommend it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
My first bike (still have it for now) is/was a 1981 Honda CB650 Custom, and the main problem I can say I had with her was that the person I got her from did not know how to maintain her, and that led to issues that in turn caused me problems. The bike itself has 4 carbs, and if you are careful, you can redo them without actually syncing them with a tool (but the tool helps get them right the first time, of course). Parts are not as easy to get as they could be, but there are ways around that with this machine, I soon discovered. HD wanted to charge $750 to do a carb rebuild for me on this bike, so I spent $14 and did it myself.

I loved this bike because she was pretty quick in the twisties for a moderately sized UJM, she was forgiving on insurance, and she hauled my 300 (at the time) pound self all over the place with ease. I did eventually change out the sprockets (and added a roller chain) to boost low end torque, and I added a different windscreen than what was there when I got the bike (as that sportier one was destroyed in my accident on that bike, as related in another thread), and overall I cannot say the bike has ever really disappointed me. I am still torn about selling her off, actually, but my wife is on me to only have one machine, and now I have two motorcycles.

I liked the displacement of this bike because my weight was like riding with a passenger all the time and even with unsynced carbs I still got better than 40 MPG with this bike. Given my 3/4 ton pickup got 7-10 mpg in town, the bike was my go-to transportation to work or anywhere else I wanted to go. I could use the saddlebags and a pack on the luggage rack to haul a FULL cart of groceries home after work, and still have room for some miscellaneous tools and rain gear on board every day. The bike is useful as all get-out, AND fun to ride. It is killing me to have to sell her!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Fortunately, HD used Buell Blasts on our MSF course, so the bike I rode there was easier to do complex maneuvers than this Honda would have been. That came in handy too, as the figure eight test using my bike would have been a failure as I goobered the throttle on the Buell, and had to horse the front wheel through the turn to keep from falling down. The instructor shook his head, and said, "Bill, just don't try to do that on your Honda, it won't work!" He gave me a certificate for "Most Maneuverable Rider" or something like that at the end of the course! I have it someplace around here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Why on Earth would your bride want you to sell off a motorcycle. It's paid for, right? What's the problem?
It is paid for. In fact, I paid cash for it. I love that bike!

She is concerned that we have so many license plates to keep renewing and that we now are using four parking spaces at the apartment (I sure wish we still lived in a house!). She even is perfectly sized to ride that bike herself, and at one time expressed an interest in doing just that if I bought another motorcycle some day. It is still possible I will change her mind, but I am not positive it will work out that way. It may even be that we have been running financially lean for so long now that she is seeing a few bucks in the driveway that could go elsewhere. These are all things she has brought up, especially when she heard Dave had left his motorcycle to me as well (the second motorcycle in that particular parking space). I have to move some things I guess. Too many toys, not than any of them are worth thousands of dollars each or anything, I really do think it is the number of license plates that is getting stuck in her craw.
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,873 Posts
Divide the total cost of renewals by 52 and put that amount in a jar each week? It's easier to swallow if you see it that way, instead of all at once.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Yes, I can see that working. Let's see, two trailers, two boats, two cars, two motorcycles.. That's 8 tags... Of course, one of the boats is cheap as heck (antique by Florida regulations so only like 6 bucks a year), so that would amount to pennies a week, most likely... About $220 divided by 52 equals $4.23 a week. I could put 5 bucks a week into a can, and she can keep the change at the end of the year. Maybe that will get her on track! She will get just short of 38 bucks ($37.96 to be more precise, or maybe $38.97)! I am going to take a shot at that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
To the OP, I would opt for a bike that was a standard at first, something a bit banged up but serviceable (so that you won't be as downtrodden when you scratch it), and something that you can work on, so something a little older rather than newer. I also would say keep below that liter displacement to keep insurance (and your insanity tendencies) at bay.

Another thing, make sure the seller has clean title in hand of course, and be sure that if the bike has to have work done, you are willing to do it yourself, or at least can get it done cheaply. Dealerships can be insane for cheap bike repairs. Also, how well the mechanicals and electrics work are FAR more important on the first bike than cosmetics, in my opinion. With the right bike, you may be able to resell it for what you bought it for, and come out even. That won't always be the case, of course, but on older bikes, that seems to be the advice I keep seeing and what I have witnessed personally with people I know (though I have not yet sold my first bike yet, so I do not know first hand this specific experience yet).

If nobody has told you yet, be DANGED careful about Craigs List bike offers, and make sure that you have the seller at the tag office, with the bike AND the title before you offer up cash. Nothing like a bad transaction to sour you on your new bike (that has the wrong title, or a faulty title, etc.) and your cash is gone. Or worse, the seller took your cash AND the bike and now you are hunting the butthead.

I have seen many reports that you don't generally get much if any extra for things you bolt onto a bike that you later sell, especially a first bike type unit (due to the dings already on it plus the ones you will likely add), so be frugal on the farkles to the things you really want on there for you to use, not for some future person who will likely have farkles of their own they want to obtain. Saddlebags are nice, but not every Ninja owner wants them. The bank often could care less what aftermarket goodies are on a used bike if the dealer did not install them as a factory option, so save your ducketts for your next bike rather than going insane on your first one, if you are at all likely to trade up in the near future. No point donating all that chrome to the next rider unless you are just that nice a guy/gal.

I liked the balance and height of my standard, but some like the nimble crotch rockets or have shorter legs and cannot ride a UJM easily. I cannot easily sit a Ninja because of my long legs, and they don't match my style. That Buell Blast (they were 500's or maybe 550's??) they used at the MSF course was darned hard for me because it had too short a leg room capacity. However, a small displacement bike can be fun if you don't weigh as much as I do and have the flexibility to be able to ride it comfortably.

Beware of bikes that put lots of weight on your arms or cram your legs under you as you ride. I prefer to let the bike support me, not forcing my arms or legs to support me. About the main snag I have with my Honda is that I have to sit a little like a bird on a roost when riding it, and that it gets crampy on anything more than about a half hour or so at a time. The pegs are just too high for me. I installed freeway pegs to counter that, but I have not yet gotten that danged bee up the leathers either. Another bonus that Dave left me his Intruder VS 1400 - at least I can relax a little now on longer trips.

I also like a windscreen, but be cautious about how that screen is supported, because those that have the two prongs supporting them (the sports screens with two aluminum rods holding them up) can be damned dangerous if the screen breaks, especially if you are not riding with a VERY thick leather jacket... Ask me how I know...
 
41 - 60 of 72 Posts
Top