Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Im new to motorcycle, but i always like being prepared. So what do you do when you get flat on motorcycle? how do you react? how do you control the bike if you are riding?
 

·
Ace Tuner
Joined
·
2,935 Posts
When you have a flat it rarely goes flat all at once.
So check your air pressure/tires before every ride looking for cuts, a nail or any damage to the tire. Keep a watch on the wheel air valve also.

If you were to loose all of the air in a tire instantly, get off the throttle, go easy on the brakes and ride it best you can.
If the rear tire has the air loss use the front brake. If it's the front tire, use the rear brake. If the brakes are linked, wing it.
And you can be glad you are wearing all that safety equipment cause you might be about to test it.

As far as being prepared, you can buy an emergency tire plug kit. There is a bunch of 'Seal n Air', CO'2 inflate kits and the like on the market.
ALL of these are nothing but TEMPORARY FIXES to get you home. Nothing else!
 

·
Female Rider
Joined
·
9,311 Posts
We carry a plug kit and an air pump at all times. We also have roadside assistance and towing on all of our vehicles and bikes. Good advice above. There is at least 1 member that had a blow out on his bike. Hopefully he'll chime in and tell you his story.

Good Luck and don't forget your T-CLOCS. pre-ride motorcycle inspection.
 

·
Gone
Joined
·
23,907 Posts
It's important to monitor your tires, because you only have two and no spares. Roadside assistance and towing is a great add-on to your insurance policy.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
23,605 Posts
A sudden pressure loss on a bike isn't a fun ride. It's basically a do the best you can to control it. I've had a rear go and it was a tank slapper in which I knew any second we were going down. All I could do was counter steer just like you do in a car when the rear wants to be in front. From the left side then the right. I used the front to brake when I could which wasn't that often. By the grace of God only, we didn't go down but did end up in the ditch which is where I tried to point the bike when I had any resemblance of control. It's not fun at all. You can trust me on that.

I've also had a flat riding solo and it's better in that you can tell something is wrong and have time to pull over before completely flat. Or it was so in my case. The bike just handled sluggish so pull over to investigate and by the time I got off I could see the rear was nearly flat and no way could I ride any further. But no tank slapper in this case. That was actually my first flat. Since then I carried a tire repair kit and a can of fix-a-flat for air. I've since dropped the fix-a-flat for a 12v air compressor. I had tried fix-a-flat at one time since and found the stuff worthless. Others may be different but it didn't work for me.
 

·
Visionary
Joined
·
4,632 Posts
A question, am I correct that there is nothing I can carry or do about a flat on the road other than call for a tow since I have spoke wheels and tube type tires? I can't see fix a flat working on a tube and I clearly can't plug it. Or am I missing something obvious?

I love the look of spokes but I think my next bike will have solid wheels because of this concern.
 

·
Gone
Joined
·
23,907 Posts
A question, am I correct that there is nothing I can carry or do about a flat on the road other than call for a tow since I have spoke wheels and tube type tires? I can't see fix a flat working on a tube and I clearly can't plug it. Or am I missing something obvious?

I love the look of spokes but I think my next bike will have solid wheels because of this concern.
You could carry a jack and tools to remove the wheel, some tire irons, an air pump, and a patch kit. It would be easier to get a tow in most cases.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
23,605 Posts
A question, am I correct that there is nothing I can carry or do about a flat on the road other than call for a tow since I have spoke wheels and tube type tires? I can't see fix a flat working on a tube and I clearly can't plug it. Or am I missing something obvious?

I love the look of spokes but I think my next bike will have solid wheels because of this concern.
I've heard there is a way to seal the spoke area of the wheel and then Ride-On claims you can use their product with tubed tires but I know no one personally that can say it works. If I had spokes I'd sure give it a try though.;)
 

·
Visionary
Joined
·
4,632 Posts
Interesting....I just read about that Ride-On stuff, I can see it working in a tubeless but I can't see how it would work in a tube, even though they claim is does I can imagine it being a bit of a mess, does it seal the tube, or leak out and then seal the hole and trap the air in the tire, or a little of both, or what?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,944 Posts
Flat.

I had been doing about 165 kph on my Suzuki sport bike. Was slowing as I entered a gradual right hand corner. Two lanes on my side, one on the other with on coming traffic. I was on the lane furthest from the ditch. The back tyre went flat very quickly. The option of straightening up and jumping hard on the binders, was not available with the opposing traffic. Only option was heavy front brake with a lot more lean, and do it very quickly, while monitoring the direction and speed. With a lot of speed off, I was able to get around this long corner, then move over to the lane at my right, and then to the edge of the road. The wide tyre wrapped around the edges of the rim, so I rode about 15 miles to the nearest bike shop, and bought a new tyre. The flat tyre looked like it had been shot thru with a 22 slug.
That is the only flat I have had on the pavement. A slow leak as Dods described is more common.
I am confident a newbie rider would have crashed, but they should not have been going that fast.

Unkle Krusty*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
I have only experienced a total loss of pressure in a tire once in over 40 years. The key to surviving is to avoid doing anything. If you let off the throttle the bike will slow down as fast as you really want to slow down. Don't panic, hang on so the steering doesn't wander and ride it to a stop. I lost the front tire so when I was down to around maybe 10 MPH I used a bit of rear brake to finish my stop. Once you are stopped, go change your shorts and then get some help.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
23,605 Posts
I have only experienced a total loss of pressure in a tire once in over 40 years. The key to surviving is to avoid doing anything. If you let off the throttle the bike will slow down as fast as you really want to slow down. Don't panic, hang on so the steering doesn't wander and ride it to a stop. I lost the front tire so when I was down to around maybe 10 MPH I used a bit of rear brake to finish my stop. Once you are stopped, go change your shorts and then get some help.
You will definitely want to do that if you have one. It's not a given you'll ever have one. If you are real lucky you see your flat when you check your tires before a ride, not while riding. But if you actually put some miles on rather than bar hope your chances go up. They don't happen often thankfully. 3 in 45 years with 1 being a pre-ride check so only 2 in that time and only 1 being the shorts changing kind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,160 Posts
I rode one out in the rain at 65miles an hour. The bike started fishtailing and sliding the rear around [rear flat tire] then the tire flat spot released and let the tire rotate for one or two revolutions, jerking the bike immediately upright. When it again caught on the flat spot, the skidding started again. The only thing that saved me was the road was wet and I was able to get my feet down enough to stabilize the bike. That would probably have been a bad move on dry pavement with the tire and my shoes likely to really bite harder, but it was pure instinct and really was a desperation move.

After probably a half dozen fishtails and the bike jerking upright ---and probably an eighth of a mile, we came to a rest. No brakes were applied. This was a 300 pound Honda CB360. I never would have gotten away with it on a bigger bike.

BTW , I did have a second flat that went down to 0 PSI, but by standing on the pegs and leaning way forward on the handlebars, I was able to move a CB750 to a repair shop a mile away. Stiffer sidewalls make a difference on some bikes.

ANY time ANY motorcycle feels funny handling in corners or otherwise, get off it and check right away, as well as pre ride inspection
 

·
ZAMM Fanatic
Joined
·
2,730 Posts
I'm new to motorcycle, but I always like being prepared. So what do you do when you get flat on motorcycle? How do you react?

Curse, cry, then either get out the tire kit and compressor or call AAA.

I was lucky. I flatted on one of my first big rides. Learned my lesson(s) about tools, mini-compressors and the fact that AAA "Premier" towing insurance is the ONLY one that actually covers motorcycles.

A tow truck driver schooled me "AAA Premier works, we get paid. The others make excuses so nobody really wants to do their towing; the customers invariably end up out of pocket and get upset."
 

·
Troublemaker
Joined
·
2,517 Posts
There are several insurance companies that provide towing insurance, and they all pay. Tow truck drivers, politicians, and Wade are all full of stories.

If I can't fix it on the side of the road, I just call the insurance company and they have someone come get the bike and take it to the shop.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top