Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone!
I'm looking to buy supersport street motorcycle, any price :)
requirements: high speed and cool design :icon_cool:
 

·
Visionary
Joined
·
3,950 Posts
I love your enthusiasm but if your buying your first bike you need to scale it back a bit.

Start small, cheap, low powered, used, slow and and slightly less cool cruiser or standard vs sport bike design.


Hello everyone!
I'm looking to buy supersport street motorcycle, any price :)
requirements: high speed and cool design :icon_cool:
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
22,147 Posts
Hello everyone!
I'm looking to buy supersport street motorcycle, any price :)
requirements: high speed and cool design :icon_cool:
I love your enthusiasm but if your buying your first bike you need to scale it back a bit.

Start small, cheap, low powered, used, slow and and slightly less cool cruiser or standard vs sport bike design.
Yep or you'll be a once was.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hello mate! Thanks for ur response. Yeah, this will be my first bike, but can I know, what is the reason I should buy slow bike at the start? I won't just go 299 km/h on the first day, I will learn and try to become pro rider
 

·
Visionary
Joined
·
3,950 Posts
The performance of the engine and the handling of the type of sport bike your thinking about are way too radical for a beginner, one twitch at the wrong moment and bad things happen, you end up needing a new bike, or a new arm, or a gravestone.
Start slow, start low performance, buy used, you can sell it for what you paid for it if you shop wisely and take care of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
809 Posts
Honda CBR500R might be a good compromise between what you think you want and what you need!

sent from my HTC 10 smartphone
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The performance of the engine and the handling of the type of sport bike your thinking about are way too radical for a beginner, one twitch at the wrong moment and bad things happen, you end up needing a new bike, or a new arm, or a gravestone.
Start slow, start low performance, buy used, you can sell it for what you paid for it if you shop wisely and take care of it.
You are right bro, the reason that I love adrenaline does not mean I should kill myself for a very stupid reason. I think I will go for 2002 y. Yamaha r600,what you think, is this good bike for a beginner? After using it I will know how to ride it well, safely and like a pro :icon_cool: But as a beginner, how should I start learning? Not just how to ride, it is not a car you know, I mean with just riding and using my bike I will fit on it and know how use it well, or there are other ways that I can start learning?
Correct me if I am wrong... Thank you :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
You are wrong, everyone has tried to correct you.... Take a motorcycle safety course, stop thinking you'll be "a pro" after riding a few times.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
You are wrong, everyone has tried to correct you.... Take a motorcycle safety course, stop thinking you'll be "a pro" after riding a few times.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I did not mean that I will be a pro after riding a few times,I think about 1-2 years should be enough to change bike to next level?
 

·
Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
Joined
·
13,290 Posts
Perhaps 2 years of riding at a professional riding school might make you ready for amateur racing.

I would check the requirements of where you are living.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Perhaps 2 years of riding at a professional riding school might make you ready for amateur racing.

I would check the requirements of where you are living.
I live in Georgia (country),there is not any riding school as far as I know. Without school, can't I become pro just with riding myself? or there if there is another method to start learn how to ride like a pro :icon_cool: as beginner..?
 

·
Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
Joined
·
13,290 Posts
In a word - no.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
I would look around do some research and get s bike that is forgiving and don't have a lot of punch right out the gate. Get used you are bound to drop the bike while you are learning.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I would look around do some research and get s bike that is forgiving and don't have a lot of punch right out the gate. Get used you are bound to drop the bike while you are learning.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thank you bro, that's what I'm saying, I will learn with myself, without anyone help. I liked Suzuki SV650, I think I will go for it and buy used one here :biggrin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
Down here in New Zealand they have a very sensible learner motorbike rider system. You have to do a basic riding course and pass a theory road rules test. Then you're allowed to buy a Learner Approved Motorcycle (LAMS) which must be less than 660 cc and have a power to weight (with 90 kg added for the rider) of below 150 kW/tonne (just less than 120 hp/ton). You ride that for about 18 months before you can get your full license and ride a bigger bike.

I rode a 250 cc learner cruiser for about 24,000 km (15,000 miles).

You should buy a smaller sports bike if that is the style of bike you want to ride, buy a secondhand bike - you will drop it, scratch it, and you lose a lot of depreciation immediately you take a new bike out of the showroom.

Down here, the Kawasaki Ninja 300 is the biggest selling LAMS bike, you'll find that it has the enough performance to keep you happy. I'd strongly advise against getting something in the 600 range as a first bike. People have started on larger bikes, but I think you learn more on a smaller less powerful bike especially on your own.

And after a few months and you're feeling more confident, ride to your nearest town and do the learner's course, the MBF or whatever it's called. Do a training course as soon as possible, that may just save your life.
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,857 Posts
Hello everyone!
I'm looking to buy supersport street motorcycle, any price :)
requirements: high speed and cool design :icon_cool:
If you want high speed, awesome acceleration, cool looks, and great handling, get an Aprillia RSV4 Factory. Sure, they're expensive, but they'll smoke just about any other "super bike" that's sold in street legal form. Plus, you'll stand out from the crowd. :)

One of those might not be the best bike to learn on though.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
If you want high speed, awesome acceleration, cool looks, and great handling, get an Aprillia RSV4 Factory. Sure, they're expensive, but they'll smoke just about any other "super bike" that's sold in street legal form. Plus, you'll stand out from the crowd. :)

One of those might not be the best bike to learn on though.;)
Yeah, this won't be good bike for me.

Down here in New Zealand they have a very sensible learner motorbike rider system. You have to do a basic riding course and pass a theory road rules test. Then you're allowed to buy a Learner Approved Motorcycle (LAMS) which must be less than 660 cc and have a power to weight (with 90 kg added for the rider) of below 150 kW/tonne (just less than 120 hp/ton). You ride that for about 18 months before you can get your full license and ride a bigger bike.

I rode a 250 cc learner cruiser for about 24,000 km (15,000 miles).

You should buy a smaller sports bike if that is the style of bike you want to ride, buy a secondhand bike - you will drop it, scratch it, and you lose a lot of depreciation immediately you take a new bike out of the showroom.

Down here, the Kawasaki Ninja 300 is the biggest selling LAMS bike, you'll find that it has the enough performance to keep you happy. I'd strongly advise against getting something in the 600 range as a first bike. People have started on larger bikes, but I think you learn more on a smaller less powerful bike especially on your own.

And after a few months and you're feeling more confident, ride to your nearest town and do the learner's course, the MBF or whatever it's called. Do a training course as soon as possible, that may just save your life.
Yesterday I did some research and found out that for beginners, the best bike is in the 300cc range, and for me personally I liked Ninja 300 with this specs, thanks for, so thank you very much! Also I found that for MSF (not MBF, I think this is correct) there is website msf-usa.org , that course is only available in USA, so I think I will have to go in USA to do training course.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top