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How do I know what watt voltage resistor to buy? I'm going to see if it make my LED turnsignals flash. But it is a 6v bike. Also, do I connect it to the output wire of the flasher relay?
 

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So you installed LED turn signals and your experiencing "hyper flashing", where the indicators flash much faster than normal? The linked resistors look like an easier way to install to your existing wires. I bought the variety that doesn't have the crimps provided, so I had to solder the resistors inline. Not a huge deal, but still more work than if the crimps already exist. I measured the wattage output with a multimeter, which is probably your best bet. The ohms to wattage relationship should be listed with the resistor. In this case:

"Select the 9.8 Ohm resistor when going from a 21 watt turn signal to an LED turn signal.
Select the 21.5 Ohm resistor when going from a 10 watt incandescent turn signal to an LED turn signal."


https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle...ors?query_id=2b62579e80581e0913872b936b9887a4
 

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How do I know what watt voltage resistor to buy? I'm going to see if it make my LED turnsignals flash. But it is a 6v bike. Also, do I connect it to the output wire of the flasher relay?
As aTahmission shows, it depends on what size bulb you are replacing. The numbers he quotes are for a 12V system (14.3V nominal), and are for replacing a single bulb, so aren't what you will need. So, here's the math. Replacing one bulb of power W at a nominal Voltage V=7.1, you take V squared (= 50.4), and divide that by W to get Ohms. You do not want to connect that resistor at the flasher relay output, because it would be operating all the time; also, in represents one bulb, and you should have four. So connect that size resistor at each bulb housing, or divide the resistor Ohms value in half, double the Wattage, and connect one to each side.

In the quoted numbers, V=14.3, and the resistor replaces one bulb at 21W, so you get 204.5 / 21 = 9.7 Ohms; 9.8 Ohms, >21W is near enough. The 10W value is a bit off, too, but that's possibly the nearest available value in a 10W resistor, and is close enough.

Simpler would be a LED rated flasher relay, but they may not exist for a 6V system.
 

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As aTahmission shows, it depends on what size bulb you are replacing. The numbers he quotes are for a 12V system (14V nominal), and are for replacing a single bulb, so aren't what you will need. So, here's the math. Replacing one bulb of power W at a nominal Voltage V=7, you take V squared = 49, and divide that by W to get Ohms. You do not want to connect that resistor at the flasher relay output, because it would be operating all the time; also, in represents one bulb, and you should have four. So connect that size resistor at each bulb housing, or divide the resistor Ohms value in half, double the Wattage, and connect one to each side.

In the quoted numbers, V=14, and the resistor replaces one bulb at 21W, so you get 196 / 21 = 9.8 Ohms, >21W. The 10W value is a bit off, but that's possibly the nearest available value in a 10W resistor, and is close enough.

Simpler would be a LED rated flasher relay, but they may not exist for a 6V system.
Fantastic post!
 

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