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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow, you folks may need a vision test. If you look closely the silver item below the swingarm is what I'm asking about. I asked on another forum and this is what they said it was.

"Its a tool to measure swingarm stress. There is a strain gauge attached to the bracket that will measure how much lateral stresses are applied to the carbon swingarm."
 

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To general of a question.
 
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It is probably a Moto2 bike that runs a 600 Honda engine. Bike number is probably the same as the right foot number. 43.
Swing arm is carbon fiber. Muffler and pipes are short for tuning purposes. A more careful viewing of the swing arm, and how the brake caliper is mounted, would reveal more about the silver drag link. In its simplest form, the drag link is there to stop the caliper going roundy round, when the rear brake pedal is stomped on at speed.
Not much need to install any gauges in it IMO. The bikes in the Moto classes do not use anti lock brakes.

UK
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It's actually a rear brake torque bar. Saw it recently in a Cycle World article.

https://www.cycleworld.com/ducati-motogp-mystery-strut-explained
That explains it, that's why I like Moto GP. Did anyone see Rossi's bike during the last wet Moto GP race? He had a curved defector attached under the bottom of the fairing located in front of the rear tire. My guess is to keep the spray from the front tire off the rear. It looked like it was working in the rain and I didn't see it on other racers bikes. I tried to find a photo on the net but haven't yet.
 

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So much cool stuff to see on the modern race bikes, stuff we only dreamed about. Now we have modern smart guys to explain how it all works. My book on suspension tuning also has a lot to say about the suspensions effect on braking. Acceleration and bumps too. We had none of that stuff in yesteryear. We did experience the shuddering / chattering from severe braking. We then knew the brakes and grip were working at their max. The tyres used to talk to us, but the new gumballs do not sing the same tunes. Although the sharp guys could tell, it was the sound of the rear tyre, that revealed the problem for Lorenzo's crash.
Imagine the joy of a bright light, working an any and all, of your bikes systems.

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Is it just me, or does anyone else wish they'd had Kevin Cameron as a college science teacher? That dude can explain ANYTHING in a way I can understand it-and that's not easy. :)


Larry
We had a problem with an H1R Kawasaki seizing. Year was 1970.
Kevin wrote an article about metal expansion maybe 2 years ago. It explained the problem. He also had the same problem way back when. We were not seizing the Yamahas.

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