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Discussion Starter #1
Riding a bike is so much more different than driving a car for many reasons. You seem to have to look for so many more things than one would in a car. Things I have noticed are potholes. Those potholes you hit with your car, on a bike can make your life miserable. The cone weave in BRC comes in real handy while trying to avoid the neverending potholes, manholes, and other types of road hazards. Not only do you have to watch out for traffic, you really need to pay more attention to what is on the roadway. Road kill is even a no go for a bike. Though I may still swerve to hit a squirrel, can't stand those little rats....(probably won't just like to talk a good game)

I'm more aware now of just how often people pull out into traffic without even looking. I'm finding myself looking at tires, and which way their heads are turned. I hesitate when I see their heads turned in a direction other than mine.

I used to be the type of person that would just toss their cig butts out the window. Now that I'm a rider and know what it feels like to have those suckers thrown at you, I'll fill up the astray. Before I started riding, I never really paid much attention to how this can affect others.

In my cage, I have to have a reason to get in the car and go. With my bike, I'll just get on and ride just for the sake of riding. Arriving at my destination isn't a relief as it is in a car. I'll look for any reason to get on the bike.

There's just so much more you need to pay attention to on a bike. Road conditions, traffic, cars/trucks, animals ect. Riding isn't as easy as I thought it would be when I first started. I'm still learning, and probably will always learn something different. There's certain things I hope I never have to learn, like how to pluck out pavement.

To those coming in that are thinking about riding, get yourself signed up for a Basic Riders Course, it is one of the most important thing you can do to help with the learning curve.
 

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Thanks for your postings. It is good reading for my wife and I . I like the refreshing perspectives. My wife is a beginner since June this year and some of your postings remind us not to be complacent on our bikes. We also like how you relate your experiences and what the BRC taught you. Hopefully we will take the course in the near future. Keep up the good posts. :)
 

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There's no doubt that riding will usually make one a more considerate cager. As the popularity of riding continues to rise, I hope we'll have more attentive drivers of other vehicles.
I kinda wish they'd teach motorcycle riding in the driver's ed classes at schools.
 

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............I'm more aware now of just how often people pull out into traffic without even looking.........I'm finding myself looking at tires, and which way their heads are turned.........

Coming down the road I travel every day, to go home from work, I come within a tenth of a mile of an extended driveway of some length, that is fully visible to me, on my right. There are a number of industrial driveways such as this one, on BOTH sides of this road I travel. This one yesterday, was just one of them. Trouble (as we all know) can be random. Anytime, anyplace.

I see a small white sedan driving rapidly down the full length of the driveway from the business, and it is showing NO indication of slowing as it approaches the road I'm on, so I slow down from 40 to 30 to compensate for the possibility that this car (as I have seen happen sooooo often on this road) COULD decide to come out onto (there's no light there, but there IS a Stop Sign for them coming from the driveway) my road without stopping.
Going the speed I WAS going, I calculated that I would be in that cars direct path, by the time the car got to the road; thus the slow down.

Sure as #$%^, she (as it turned out), a young girl in her mid-twenties I surmise, didn't even slow down........not one MPH.......just barreled out onto the road in front of me; bouncing and skidding the cage as she navigated the turn.

Fortunately, because I saw the potential and adjusted for it before I got there, I had about a two car-length gap behind her by the time she turned on to the main road I was on, while I covered the front and rear brakes, in case I needed them.

As we got further down the road, her in front of me, we approached a place where the road turns to two lanes, and has a light (it was red). I had to pull up alongside her, because I was turning left there, and she was turning right. It just happened that the traffic in front of us, also waiting at the light, was stacked in such a way that we would be side by side. I wanted to say something............so bad...........

The light turned green just as she and I arrived, and the traffic in front of us started rolling just as we got there, so I had no time to comment. I had to get busy "going."

Could I have "flipped her the bird?" Sure. I had enough time for THAT, but didn't (I'm just not that way).

It was just another example of what you are saying...........is all.

As for watching the tires...........I do that all the time. However, I am still in a quandary about it. I'm always checking both ways anyway, to see if their tires move, and if I can make eye contact with the driver, anticipating that there can be some sort of mental telepathy between us, that might cause the driver to hesitate, and communicate that to their accelerator foot.

What are the studies on this folks? I would imagine that in this pool of riders, someone has not only heard of watching the tires for rotation, but can also site some studies on the matter. Someone must know how this action (of watching tires) came about, and why it works. Anyone?


-Soupy
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I learned early on to not confront a cager on a bike. After all, bike don't have no protection in case the cage decides to pull something. I was riding down the road as a pillion when a jeep decided to pass us in a no passing zone after tailgating us for a period of time. I got pissed and waved my middle finger and called him a butthole (cleaned up for forum). Next thing I knew he brake checked us. I thought he was going to stay stopped, and the fighter in me was just ready to hop off and show him the kind of lady I am. Thankfully he just took off, as all is well. But that got me thinking, it could have ended very badly.
 

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Zippy, a bike or a car face the same hazards. The difference is that if you miss something on a bike it can kill you. If you learn from riding experiences and then drive a car you will be a better car driver.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, my caging habits have certainly changed now that i've learned the mc. Maybe somehow a motorcycle simulation taught at drivers ed would make people more considerate or atleast understand where a motorcyclist comes from. I never knew a bike could stop faster than a car could, till I started riding. Now I make sure that I do leave the proper space between us, incase he needs to make an emergency stop.
 

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I see a small white sedan driving rapidly down the full length of the driveway from the business, and it is showing NO indication of slowing as it approaches the road I'm on, so I slow down from 40 to 30 to compensate for the possibility that this car COULD decide to come out onto my road without stopping.
That's how you turn a potentially bad situation into a non-event. Yes, you had the right of way and could continue at speed assuming the driver will stop. It would be perfectly legal for you to do so. By looking ahead, anticipating what might happen, and adjusting your speed, you removed a risk factor and kept yourself safe.
 

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Making eye contact is a good strategy, but realize that people will also look right through you at times.

Don't drop your guard.
 

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"Next thing I knew he brake checked us. I thought he was going to stay stopped, and the fighter in me was just ready to hop off "

You're starting to get an idea of why a lot of motorycle riders - esp. those who ride a lot of traffic - seem to be "hostile". It's not because we drink tons of beer and watch Sons Of Anarchy. It is because of cr*p like this - the kind of behavior from some drivers that you just described.

Many drivers of cars (i.e. cages) never seem to stop and realize that a motorcycle does NOT have a front bumper and a rear bumper. If a car taps your wheels, there is a good chance that you are going down onto the asphalt. I know several guys who ride heavy cruisers (like my bike) ... and EVERY single one who pancaked their front wheel (i.e. low-side accident) wound up going to the hospital with broken ribs. That is a "good" potential outcome for that type of incident. It can get worse.

SO ... if somebody delibately "brake checks" your bike ... what they are telling you is that they WANT to bust up your ribs, do serious damage to your bike, and probably put you in the ER. THAT is the message that the motorcycle rider will read from that type of behavior ... even though the driver of the cage may be a moron and have not considered this stuff. So ... you can see WHY we get into a fairly hostile mindset with this cr*p happening on the roads.

BUT lets remember two things ...

1. There are a lot of car drivers out there who are very considerate of bikes. Those folks are MUCH appreciated!

2. LIKE you said ... it doesnt pay to escalate an incident. Try to avoid direct person-to-person confrontations ... because that can escalate. I usally just put a lot of SPACE between my bike and these retarded cages.

to borrow a line from SOA - one of the few really good lines they have (besides the theme song) - BRAINS BEFORE BULLETS!!

dT
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You didn't hear me say this neither....I carry a switchblade with a windshield breaker on the end....I'll do more than break a taillight, he can kiss his back window goodbye. By the time he figured out what happened, I'd be on the bike and gone.....
 

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a lot of bikers will carry a knife ... and its a very handy tool (as well as a self defense item). BUT drawing a weapon in a conflict can rapidly escalate to serious consequences ... a lot of cage srivers are carrrying guns these days. If you give him the "excuse" to feel threatened ... the law might work against you.

a tail light is a reasonable consequence. or a dent in a rear side door from the toes of a boot. taking out a whole windshield is moving to bigger consequences.

STAY COOL ..... THINK IT THROUGH :)

dT
 

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You didn't hear me say this neither....I carry a switchblade with a windshield breaker on the end....I'll do more than break a taillight, he can kiss his back window goodbye. By the time he figured out what happened, I'd be on the bike and gone.....
LOL. you didn't learn that at BRC....LMAO!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
As long as they don't come after me they don't have a problem. If that guy in the jeep had decided to get out of the jeep, you know I'd get off the bike. I'm not the type of person to stand down. I'll fight to the very end before I cower down to a thug. Once the guy decided to just leave, well, situation avoided. There would have been no need for me to go after him, just let him go and ride on.
 

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That's how you turn a potentially bad situation into a non-event. Yes, you had the right of way and could continue at speed assuming the driver will stop. It would be perfectly legal for you to do so. By looking ahead, anticipating what might happen, and adjusting your speed, you removed a risk factor and kept yourself safe.
"Better to be Right and live, than to be DEAD right!"

-Soupy
 

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As long as they don't come after me they don't have a problem. If that guy in the jeep had decided to get out of the jeep, you know I'd get off the bike. I'm not the type of person to stand down. I'll fight to the very end before I cower down to a thug. Once the guy decided to just leave, well, situation avoided. There would have been no need for me to go after him, just let him go and ride on.

Now I KNOW I want you to come on our next "ride." I'll just hide behind YOU, if we have trouble (lol)!!!!!

-Soupy
 

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ONE THING that's worth remembering ...

we live in a world of videos now where almost anybody can shoot a quick video with their smart phone - and people often do.

If you happen to have an onboard camera on your motorcycle, then it may capture any kind of incident out there. that goes for accidents and road rage attacks.

BUT if someone else takes the video, then they may not start their recording at the time of the initial problem. That means that their video would contain how your reponded to the attack - but not what the perpetrator did to cause the trouble. so you coukd wind up looking "guity" ... on YouTube and maybe to the police too.

just remember ... almost everything you do in public ... can be caught on a video these days.

dT
 
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