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Ok, so please excuse me if this is an obviously dumb question, but I am new to motorcycles. I've been looking at many cruisers and changing my own tires and all that, I've also seem some things on tube and tubeless tires. I know one has an inner-tube and the other does not. However can any bike use either type? Also how will I know why my bike has, short of asking? If bikes can use either, what do you guys think is best? The tubeless seem a lot easier to change so I might go with these however are there disadvantages to them and do they really matter, or is it just preference? Thanks for the help!
 

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Tubeless tires are a newer design and are on the cutting edge of performance. I find tubed tires are more for spoked rims where using a tubeless tire would be impossible due to the many leaks where each spoke hole is drilled through the rim. Newer bikes use tubeless tires for good reason. Makes on the road repairs easier too. Not that I guess i am supposed to, but last flat I had with a tubeless rear tire I just plugged the hole & was on my way. I still use that tire & have had zero trouble since plugging it. Like to see ya do that with a tube!:D
 

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The rim style will determine what type of tire you need to have. You can't switch to a tubeless tire if the wheel is designed for a tubed tire.
 

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Tire makers mostly make tubeless tires because of customer demand for them; customers want them because of the easier maintenance, like puncture repairs. It is unusual, now, to find tube-only tires for street motorcycles. Tubeless tires have more heavily reinforced bead sections, so that they grip the rim better and provide a better seal, which makes them harder to mount by hand. Tubeless tires work just as well on a wheel that requires tubes, just insert a properly-fitted tube. If you have wheels that require tubes, like spoked rims, there are methods to seal them so that a tube is not needed, provided the rim provides a good enough sealing surface to hold the tire bead. Wheels sealed this way are often more susceptible to road hazards, because the bead sealing area is often somewhat less than a wheel made for tubeless tires; plus, there's the possibility the spoke sealant starts to leak.
 
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