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Maybe a bikes length from meeting the Apex?
What we say at the Superbike School is that once you know for sure that you are going to hit the apex, that is when you move your eyes up to the next reference point. Typically you need a minimum of 3 reference points for each corner, where to turn, where to apex and where to exit. As we were mentioning before, if you try and look to the exit of the corner too early, you can lose track of where you are mid corner and end up making multiple steering corrections (wobbly lines). By having a series of points to look at, you can effectively plot your line and as you practice the timing of when to move your eyes and what to look at in what sequence, your collection of visual information should improve and with that visual improvement also comes improvement in your control outputs. Better visual information coming in = better and smoother actions coming out. :)
 

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I don't want this to appear to be one of those, if you haven't crashed you cannot become a skilled driver things. I'm just discussing the importance of learning how not to crash from the experience of having a crash. It would be better of course to learn how not to crash from others so we avoid the hard ground contact in person, but apparently many are not learning the easy way. And of course there are other aspects of becoming a skilled rider as others have already pointed out that do not include crashing at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #123
"If you try and look to the exit of the corner too early, you can lose track of where you are mid corner and end up making multiple steering corrections (wobbly lines)." This is exactly what happens to me when I attempt high speed cornering. It's an issue for me at when executing turns at higher speeds, like out in the Hill Country "canyon carving." Don't have any problems at or near the speed limit on public roads, which is most of what I do. Still, I can see how approaching every turn in the way Misti recommends could result in smoother, more precise cornering at any speed.

I'm going to put this into practice and see how it goes!
 

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I don't want this to appear to be one of those, if you haven't crashed you cannot become a skilled driver things. I'm just discussing the importance of learning how not to crash from the experience of having a crash. It would be better of course to learn how not to crash from others so we avoid the hard ground contact in person, but apparently many are not learning the easy way. And of course there are other aspects of becoming a skilled rider as others have already pointed out that do not include crashing at all.
We all know very well how to minimize risks but our desires suppress our logic. Sometimes we need some bitter experiences to learn better and to apply it. I ve learned to slow down at crossroads after being hit buy a SUV, for example. lol. Now I stop at cross roads.
 

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What we say at the Superbike School is that once you know for sure that you are going to hit the apex, that is when you move your eyes up to the next reference point. Typically you need a minimum of 3 reference points for each corner, where to turn, where to apex and where to exit. As we were mentioning before, if you try and look to the exit of the corner too early, you can lose track of where you are mid corner and end up making multiple steering corrections (wobbly lines). By having a series of points to look at, you can effectively plot your line and as you practice the timing of when to move your eyes and what to look at in what sequence, your collection of visual information should improve and with that visual improvement also comes improvement in your control outputs. Better visual information coming in = better and smoother actions coming out. :)

Misti, thanks for all the great input. It's not only doing but being conscious of the inputs that helps to build the entire picture. Keep doing what you're doing and thanks again!
 

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"If you try and look to the exit of the corner too early, you can lose track of where you are mid corner and end up making multiple steering corrections (wobbly lines)." This is exactly what happens to me when I attempt high speed cornering. It's an issue for me at when executing turns at higher speeds, like out in the Hill Country "canyon carving." Don't have any problems at or near the speed limit on public roads, which is most of what I do. Still, I can see how approaching every turn in the way Misti recommends could result in smoother, more precise cornering at any speed.

I'm going to put this into practice and see how it goes!
YES!!!! This is amazing! I'm glad to hear that you have recognized when and how this problem arrises for you. I look forward to hearing how it goes when you are able to put it into practice!! Please let me know :)


Misti, thanks for all the great input. It's not only doing but being conscious of the inputs that helps to build the entire picture. Keep doing what you're doing and thanks again!
Absolutely! Thanks!! It really is important to be conscious of what you are doing when riding and what you should/could be doing instead. Often times the first step to changing a bad riding habit is noticing that you are doing it in the first place! We have so many students that say, "I had no idea I was doing it wrong!" and then from there they can begin to notice themselves when the bad habit arrises and then they can take steps to changing the behaviour. It's really hard to change something with your own riding if you don't even know you are doing it wrong. That is one of the reasons why I enjoy asking questions on forums so much, because it gets people THINKING about their own riding which is essentially the first step. Thanks again!
 

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We have so many students that say, "I had no idea I was doing it wrong!"
You have hit on one of the strongest advantages to attending a class(s) at a quality school. Not only to learn a better way or alternative way and build on that, but also to get quality evaluations of our current skills/lack of skills, from another set of trained eyes. Being critical of our own skills helps, watching video of our skills helps, getting feedback from other skilled riders in our group helps. Combine that with getting feedback from a professional instructor can accelerate the learning and skill building process many times over.
 
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