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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On my back tire it is stamped with 12.0/90-16. This is for a 1982 Honda cm450. What back tire can I replace it with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have these for the front tire...

Shinko 712 100/90-18 Front Tire
J&P Cycles Part Number: ZZ26255

Manufacturer Part Number: 87-4140
$49.99
$66.99 Save $17.00 (25%)
 

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On my back tire it is stamped with 12.0/90-16. This is for a 1982 Honda cm450. What back tire can I replace it with?
Are you certain that's not 120/90-16? Over on a Honda site, the consensus is that it is the correct size, but it can accept a 130/90-16 with some adjustment to the chain guard.
BTW, the original size should have been 4.6-16 (inch size tires were 100% profile).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm looking for a front tire to replace a 120 / 90 - 16. Would a 110 / 90 -16 a suitable replacement?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for that link! It taught me better than the one Google sent me to! What I got from the link you posted was the first number is the width and the last number is the diameter. Those seem to be the most crucial points to consider in ensuring that the new tires fit. Am I correct in this assumption?
It may not matter since I can't seem to find a motorcycle mechanic in this area that will touch a 1982 bike. Not even to change the tires. I may have to go to YouTube to seek help on doing a basic safety check and changing the da** tires myself!
Looks like I have a lot of mechanical learning to do before I can afford a new one. Just hoping this one does not kill me or breaks down before I have a chance to hone my skills, to the point of knowing I won't damage a new, or pre-owned newer bike.
 

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Thanks for that link! It taught me better than the one Google sent me to! What I got from the link you posted was the first number is the width and the last number is the diameter. Those seem to be the most crucial points to consider in ensuring that the new tires fit. Am I correct in this assumption?
It may not matter since I can't seem to find a motorcycle mechanic in this area that will touch a 1982 bike. Not even to change the tires. I may have to go to YouTube to seek help on doing a basic safety check and changing the da** tires myself!
Looks like I have a lot of mechanical learning to do before I can afford a new one. Just hoping this one does not kill me or breaks down before I have a chance to hone my skills, to the point of knowing I won't damage a new, or pre-owned newer bike.
Glad it helped!

Kind of... They are all important because changing just one, even a little bit, is going to affect how the bike handles. Not that that is necessarily a bad thing, just something to note and "feel out" the first couple of rides if you do make a change in size.

Motorcycles are great for learning! And everything you learn to do yourself either saves you a bit of money (depending on tools/time cost) or boosts your knowledge base and self-reliance!

You might search around for a mobile mechanic. I found one on Craigslist who charged 1/3 what a shop charges. I learned a few things and, most importantly, got to make sure the job was done correctly!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for that link! It taught me better than the one Google sent me to! What I got from the link you posted was the first number is the width and the last number is the diameter. Those seem to be the most crucial points to consider in ensuring that the new tires fit. Am I correct in this assumption?
It may not matter since I can't seem to find a motorcycle mechanic in this area that will touch a 1982 bike. Not even to change the tires. I may have to go to YouTube to seek help on doing a basic safety check and changing the da** tires myself!
Looks like I have a lot of mechanical learning to do before I can afford a new one. Just hoping this one does not kill me or breaks down before I have a chance to hone my skills, to the point of knowing I won't damage a new, or pre-owned newer bike.
Glad it helped!

Kind of... They are all important because changing just one, even a little bit, is going to affect how the bike handles. Not that that is necessarily a bad thing, just something to note and "feel out" the first couple of rides if you do make a change in size.

Motorcycles are great for learning! And everything you learn to do yourself either saves you a bit of money (depending on tools/time cost) or boosts your knowledge base and self-reliance!

You might search around for a mobile mechanic. I found one on Craigslist who charged 1/3 what a shop charges. I learned a few things and, most importantly, got to make sure the job was done correctly!
Thanks Doc!
Well the unthinkable has happened. And my back tire is going flat now. Guess I will have to learn fast and buy the right tools. If anyone has any good links to the best YouTube videos on how to change tires. It would be much appreciated if you posted them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
An update to my situation on my tires.
I found two perfect matches at walmart.com. I will call them in the morning and see if they will install them on a 1982 Honda ???.
The Rear tire is a bit pricey at over $102. But the front one is almost half that price. If they will do the work I am set. In the meantime. I will look to see if there is something that punctured the back tire. If I can find it and it is small. I will try to pull it out and put stop leak in it.
I have this weekend off and was planning to ride it to an abandoned parking lot to practice slow and quick turns. Of course I will check with Walmart first, to see if this will be okay, and they will still change the tire with stop leak in it.
In my mind, I have a slight memory of stop leak making it more difficult to change a tire with it, in it.
Does anyone have any thoughts about that?
 

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Fix a Flat, Slime, etc. will create a very tacky gel-like mush or residue all over the inside of the wheel and tire. Turns an inconvenient job into a real pain. I think that some brands even specify to NOT use them on motorcycle tires. I'd avoid it...
 

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Fix a Flat, Slime, etc. will create a very tacky gel-like mush or residue all over the inside of the wheel and tire. Turns an inconvenient job into a real pain. I think that some brands even specify to NOT use them on motorcycle tires. I'd avoid it...
Correct. However, Ride-On is specifically designed for motorcycles and does a great job of balancing the tire/wheel with a bonus of stopping leaks from nails and screws.
 
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