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American Legion Rider
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I think the biggest is any kind of mechanical or electrical breakdown. Next is food poisoning or anything that would make you unable to ride. That's not limited to just food but stepping off a curb and breaking your leg. Those two will hit just about anything. You can nit pick it down to exact items if you want. Such as mechanical would also cover a flat tire in my way of thinking or clutch or brake lever breaking from a dropped bike.
 

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Aging & Worn
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You're kidding, right?! Geez!!

More road weariness; (fatigue)
More potential danger
More "outdoor" exposure (good AND bad)

C'mon! You can imagine this stuff!! You don't need US to paint a picture for you!
 

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Experience is the best teacher and you will learn by traveling on you bike. That being said, modern motorcycles are no less reliable than cars these days and there is always Auto club or help if needed. But, specific to motorcycles there are things to consider. Like soupy1975 pointed out the physical demand is greater and you have to monitor you condition constantly especially as you get older. You also have limited space so taking what’s needed vs what’s wanted is always a give and take process. The risks are greater but the rewards are greater.
 

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Gone.
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17,857 Posts
Experience is the best teacher and you will learn by traveling on you bike. That being said, modern motorcycles are no less reliable than cars these days and there is always Auto club or help if needed. But, specific to motorcycles there are things to consider. Like soupy1975 pointed out the physical demand is greater and you have to monitor you condition constantly especially as you get older. You also have limited space so taking what’s needed vs what’s wanted is always a give and take process. The risks are greater but the rewards are greater.
^^^Pretty much covers it.:71baldboy:
 

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So long
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I've never had an incident parking my bike overnight in a hotel lot, but that's a part of traveling that I don't like.

Years ago a buddy's Harley was stolen out of a hotel lot. More recently a guy I know had his Beemer race bike and trailer stolen despite backing the trailer against the hotel building.
 

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As a dual-sport rider, just a few:

- Wildlife (bears, moose, deer, porcupines, free range livestock)
- Fire pits & nails (popped tires)
- Overheating brakes during mountain descents (lesson learned last night)
- Hanging branches
- 4x4s and side-by-sides coming down tight single lane trails
- Rocks kicked up from other riders ahead of you
- Broken clutch and brake levers, mirrors, and turn signals from drops
- Bending rims on large rocks
- Shale
- Sand
- Unusually deep mud holes
- Dehydration
- Sun glare
 

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I think the most common and dangerous habit of new riders is target fixation. Come to think of it, I would guess that this is a common demon of even experienced riders. It seems easy enough to say "don't look where you're going. Look where you want to go". The problem though, is that you often experience target fixation in situations that are split-second. I think this is a skill that needs to be practiced relentlessly, even if you've been on a bike for decades. How often do you see accidents where the rider didn't swerve or even hit the brake? I recall one of the many "tail of the dragon" videos (it's a road, people. Not a track) where someone goes too hot into a corner, locks up, and rides straight over the precipice. Practice staying lose and looking where you want to go. It could save your life.

 

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2021 CanAm Spyder RT
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I'll add a few issues not yet mentioned. First, severe inclement weather. Riding in the rain is not a problem, although your visibility to car and truck drivers is significantly reduced which is a great risk to you. But really severe weather can be life threatening. Strong winds, hurricane like downpours, unexpected icing on the road, etc. all can end a trip, at least temporarily while you wait it out. Another minor hazard is lodging. Most of us stop at motels, although a fair number camp out. Don't assume every motel will welcome your dollars. Some do not want bikers at all, some will not allow you to park where you would like, etc. while on the other hand some places will go out of their way to be helpful (I stopped last year at a place in Tennessee that had a garage just for bikes, for weather protection and physical security, all for $5 extra). Another hazard, for some bikes more than others, are long stretches of road without gas stations. There are places out west where someone traveling with a Harley Sportster with its tiny gas tank might have a real problem. Lack of dealers of certain brands can be a challenge, if you break down and parts are needed that a general motorcycle shop will not have and might not be able to get quickly. You might have a hard time finding a Ducati, or MotoGuzzi, or even Triumph dealer in many parts of the country. This is one area where Harley is the king, and Honda somewhere behind them in terms of availability of brand dealers. But I think the biggest risk for many riders has already been mentioned: fatigue. On the road too many riders try to go too far too quickly and are still riding long after they should have quit for the day. Fatigue behind the wheel can be bad. Fatigue on a bike can quickly become deadly. Good luck with your travels. Despite all these hazards, bike trips can be life changing positive experiences.
 

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As hogcowboy said mech or electrical breakdown. When i take a long trip , i worry about battery(charging system) if the battery is a few years old or flats. I have spokes so, a plug is not an option. portable chargers/jump starters are your friend and the technology is getting much better today and they are inexpensive. Sometimes, i just want to buy extra parts to bring along just in case like an R/R (especially , if you know youre going to hold on to the bike for a while).
 

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I think the most common and dangerous habit of new riders is target fixation. Come to think of it, I would guess that this is a common demon of even experienced riders. It seems easy enough to say "don't look where you're going. Look where you want to go". The problem though, is that you often experience target fixation in situations that are split-second. I think this is a skill that needs to be practiced relentlessly, even if you've been on a bike for decades. How often do you see accidents where the rider didn't swerve or even hit the brake? I recall one of the many "tail of the dragon" videos (it's a road, people. Not a track) where someone goes too hot into a corner, locks up, and rides straight over the precipice. Practice staying lose and looking where you want to go. It could save your life.
yeah... how do others practice this, I'm still new but since i know this can be a big problem, I've been trying to train myself to often focus on where I WANT to go on the road (for practice, when I really don't need to) like if there are those tar snakes, that won't bother me, but I take the opportunity to focus on where I want to go, perhaps swerving a little bit to go between to of them, or to the right side of a manhole (or left) in situations where it really doesn't matter so that I can try to train my brain to NOT look at what I am wanting to avoid but stay fixated on the spot of the road I want to be in... I try not to overthink this but make it casual and work it into my subconscious so it become second nature over time... (that's the theory anyway).

how to you all practice this? do you do the same?
 

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I like the miserable memories! :smile:

I want to ride to places few people have seen; don't need or want all good roads and weather. Comfort equals boring, I want a trip I will remember.
Winding mountain roads, mud, gravel, dirt and dust. Give me something I will remember.
Blinding sun, dehydrating heat, numbing cold, high winds and pouring rain, bring it on, make it an adventure.
Roadside repairs, parking lot oil changes, sleeping on benches and helpful strangers will all be remembered.
When I get home I want to be bruised and sunburnt, hands swollen from days of riding.
The bike will need hours of cleaning, another oil change and new tires. I will have 1000 photos and 100 stories.
Photos of miserable moments have been framed and hung and all have a story.

At the end of the trip I will be happy and then sad because after all of the planning and preparation the ride is over.
Perfect roads and weather were soon forgotten.

Looking back my most miserable moments have become my favorite memories.

I can’t wait to go again……
 

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American Legion Rider
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26,039 Posts
As hogcowboy said mech or electrical breakdown. When i take a long trip , i worry about battery(charging system) if the battery is a few years old or flats. I have spokes so, a plug is not an option. portable chargers/jump starters are your friend and the technology is getting much better today and they are inexpensive. Sometimes, i just want to buy extra parts to bring along just in case like an R/R (especially , if you know youre going to hold on to the bike for a while).
Battery issues can be a thing of the past with a portable jump start kit, similar to these. I've started carrying one but I got it for recharging my phone or computer if I'm carrying it on the road. The jump start became a side benefit but I've helped a couple of stranded bikers already. It's quick and easy and doesn't require getting to my bikes battery. Both stranded bikers said they were not only going to replace their shot batteries but were going to buy a jump start kit just so they could also help a stranded rider. Who knows if they followed thru but at least I got them on their way.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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15,544 Posts
I like the miserable memories! :smile:

I want to ride to places few people have seen; don't need or want all good roads and weather. Comfort equals boring, I want a trip I will remember.
Winding mountain roads, mud, gravel, dirt and dust. Give me something I will remember.
Blinding sun, dehydrating heat, numbing cold, high winds and pouring rain, bring it on, make it an adventure.
Roadside repairs, parking lot oil changes, sleeping on benches and helpful strangers will all be remembered.
When I get home I want to be bruised and sunburnt, hands swollen from days of riding.
The bike will need hours of cleaning, another oil change and new tires. I will have 1000 photos and 100 stories.
Photos of miserable moments have been framed and hung and all have a story.

At the end of the trip I will be happy and then sad because after all of the planning and preparation the ride is over.
Perfect roads and weather were soon forgotten.

Looking back my most miserable moments have become my favorite memories.

I can’t wait to go again……

Yeah, but you aren't human!
 
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