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Hello everyone, I went for a ride around my block today and realize I feel more comfortable/ confident turning left … is that weird? Normal to have a more comfortable turn? I remember I felt the same during MSF course.. turning left for some reason makes me nervous. Did any of you go through something similar when starting to ride? Or making u turns going left 😣 Thanks in advance
 

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2009 BMW R1200RT-Patrol
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A lot of trainers and training instructions talk about turning in your less-comfortable direction. We all have a bias one way or another. At the top it is nearly unrecognizable, but for us mortals, we could measure it if we bothered to.

What the coaches seem to be consistent on is to practice the one you are less comfortable with. We really ought to be able to turn in both directions ... just in case it is The Right Thing To Do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A lot of trainers and training instructions talk about turning in your less-comfortable direction. We all have a bias one way or another. At the top it is nearly unrecognizable, but for us mortals, we could measure it if we bothered to.

What the coaches seem to be consistent on is to practice the one you are less comfortable with. We really ought to be able to turn in both directions ... just in case it is The Right Thing To Do.
Okay I see will be practicing my right turns more, thank you!
 

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Hello everyone, I went for a ride around my block today and realize I feel more comfortable/ confident turning left … is that weird? Normal to have a more comfortable turn? I remember I felt the same during MSF course.. turning left for some reason makes me nervous. Did any of you go through something similar when starting to ride? Or making u turns going left 😣 Thanks in advance
Likely you are right-handed and feel more comfortable pushing your dominant hand (just my impression).
EXCEPT when moving slowly, to get into the habit of "pushing left hand" to turn left and pushing right hand to to turn right. (This reinforces the proper technique for counter-steering). Seems to be that new riders tend to favor one side (their dominant?) to the other, like due to comfort lever doing an exciting (and seemingly dangerous) new thing. Hope this helps...
 

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Not weird, you're so sharp and aware to have noticed that, good job!!! :) Heard same from very experienced rider this last weekend on top of South Mountain. We came up with some possibilities:

- road visibility, left-turns puts you on outside of curves, and curve isn't as tight. Can see further around corner and really helps sets up corners. Right turns tend to be on inside of curves, are tighter, requires sharper steering inputs and you can't see around turns as easily. Mentally, more difficult.

- weight on hands, Left hand is stationary while right hand requires more control to manage throttle. You push in direction you want to turn, so left-turn requires just pushing on left bar. Simple, doesn't matter if you wiggle or twist left hand. But to push on right bar while maintaining same throttle-angle is more difficult because beginners tends to grip bars too tight and put too much weight on hands anyway. So this weighting differences between left & right turns makes right-turns more difficult.

What really helps is learning to put NO weight on handlebars. Work on gripping tank with knees and holding upper-body with stomach & back-muscles. Next work on going around corners same way with no weight on bars. Practice coasting with both-hands off bar to feel which muscles are involved in holding upper body. Work out those muscles, I've found roman-chair back-lifts really helps.

With no upper body-weight on bars, you can use your upper-body muscles to push firmly on bar to initiate turns. One arm's not fighting body-weigh on other arm pushing back, fighting the turn. Another exercise that really helps right-turns is doing it one-handed. Take left-hand off bars and push with right to initiate turn. You'll find without body-weight on left bar, it's easier to get bike to lean over and make right turn.
 

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I had a neck surgery years ago an looking left can be hard for me to do sometimes so turning right is tougher for me to see but turning right is more comfortable for me when I don't need to look left.
 

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Not weird, you're so sharp and aware to have noticed that, good job!!! :) Heard same from very experienced rider this last weekend on top of South Mountain. We came up with some possibilities:

- road visibility, left-turns puts you on outside of curves, and curve isn't as tight. Can see further around corner and really helps sets up corners. Right turns tend to be on inside of curves, are tighter, requires sharper steering inputs and you can't see around turns as easily. Mentally, more difficult.

- weight on hands, Left hand is stationary while right hand requires more control to manage throttle. You push in direction you want to turn, so left-turn requires just pushing on left bar. Simple, doesn't matter of you wiggle or twist left hand. But to push on right bar while maintaining same throttle-angle is more difficult because beginners tends to grip bars too tight and put too much weight on hands anyway. So this weighting differences between left & right turns makes right-turns more difficult.

What really helps is learning to put NO weight on handlebars. Work on gripping tank with knees and holding upper-body with stomach & back-muscles. Practice coasting with both-hands off bar to feel which muscles are involved. Next work on going around corners same way with no weight on bars. Work out those muscles, I've found roman-chair back-lifts really helps.

With no upper body-weight on bars, you can use your upper-body muscles to push firmly on bar to initiate turns. One arm's not fighting body-weigh on other arm pushing back, fighting the turn. Another exercise that really helps right-turns is doing it one-handed. Take left-hand off bars and push with right to initiate turn. You'll find without body-weight on left bar, it's easier to get bike to lean over and make right turn.
Great analysis and suggestions! What is funny (actually, annoying) to me is that I'm much more comfortable with right-hand turns, even though both my low sides happened with... right hand turns. Hitting back roads at speed has me leery of vehicles who use the center line as more of a "suggestion" than a rule and I've met more than a few cars who felt I was being selfish by using more than half of my side. I also have a bit of fear of being leaned over on paint...
 

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Left turns have you looking and turning wider at least if you drive on the right side of the rd. So your sort of wide angle viewing into the turn.

A sharper right turn requires not going too slow as to lose your balance and not too fast as to swing i to oncoming traffic. Your closer to the curb usually as well. So your looking down at a tighter angle. So maybe more uncomfortable.

With a lefty you can look up at the light, then straight and to the right and then ahead into the turn all with mjnimal head turn. A right turn needs a sharp left turn then back right for the turn after a quick look up to the light for an arrow or red light all while doing a tighter turn.

A lefty you can lean less and cost through, a righty can require slowing down a lot more and then turning and acceleraring so you son't have to put a foot down like a noob.

So naturally, the less work, the less discomfort I imagine.

Just my thoughts on it.
 
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