Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,480 Posts
Same here - I change the oil, and crank it without starting for a few seconds, and put it up. Fuel treatment in the tank, drain the carbs, then let treated fuel back into the carbs; air up the tires to max on the sidewalls, if I can't lift them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,145 Posts
I used to pour about a teaspoon of motor oil through each spark plug hole then crank the engine over a few times (without sparkplugs) in order to coat the combustion chamber with oil as part of winter storage, but I don't do even that any more. Maybe if I was storing the bike for over a year then yes, but no longer for just a few months storage
 

·
Troublemaker
Joined
·
2,517 Posts
I used to pour about a teaspoon of motor oil through each spark plug hole then crank the engine over a few times (without sparkplugs) in order to coat the combustion chamber with oil as part of winter storage, but I don't do even that any more. Maybe if I was storing the bike for over a year then yes, but no longer for just a few months storage
The Raider has ceramic lined cylinders, not much that oil will help unless you want to oil the valves.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
7,516 Posts
I think Juju was asking about oiling the outside of the bike, such as chrome pieces and other parts to protect against the harsh elements. Maybe I'm wrong?

All I do is before the bike/ scoot is hibernated for the winter is to elevate it off the ground on my lift and detail it with a nice thick coat of wax, treat the fuel and then cover the bike. I plug in the battery tender periodically.

I have never, ever fogged cylinders through the intake nor poured oil in the sparkplug holes. This is antiquated thinking not really applicable to modern bikes.

Sam:):coffeescreen:
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,857 Posts
I'm guessing a little oil will keep the mating surface of the rings from rusting. Might be a good thing if it's going to be stored for a long time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
I have never, ever fogged cylinders through the intake nor poured oil in the sparkplug holes. This is antiquated thinking not really applicable to modern bikes.

Sam:):coffeescreen:
Really? The newer engines are definitely built better than they were 30 years ago but why would you let rust get started during storage?
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
7,516 Posts
Oldman, I don't believe rust would get started within the engine and trans over a winters worth of storage, at least if it has, I've never heard of it. It may be different as far as long term storage goes.

Sam:icon_cool:
 

·
Member Map
Joined
·
23,909 Posts
Oldman, I don't believe rust would get started within the engine and trans over a winters worth of storage, at least if it has, I've never heard of it. It may be different as far as long term storage goes.

Sam:icon_cool:
The oil present in the engine during short term storage should coat the interior of the engine enough to prevent any rust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
Oldman, I don't believe rust would get started within the engine and trans over a winters worth of storage, at least if it has, I've never heard of it. It may be different as far as long term storage goes.

Sam:icon_cool:
What are your rings made of? Stainless maybe? If I stored a bike over winter, I ride mine, I would be very wary of leaving compression and oil rings unprotected. It would not take much of a rust spot on a ring to ruin the inner surface of a cylinder.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
7,516 Posts
I agree about the trouble rusted rings could cause but I'd be willing to bet a crisp, new one dollar bill that your Polaris Dealer has NEVER seen the problem, especially in the typical 3-4 month hibernation period. Modern oils don't "wash down" at least I've never heard of it.

If the sparkplugs are easy to get to then for piece of mind, if ya want to then put a squirt of oil in the cylinder(s) slowly turn the engine over and then replace the plugs.

I bet your dealer would tell you it was a waste of time unless it was for LONG time storage and then there is an entire list of things to be done to the bike prior to and then when returned to use.

Sam:):coffeescreen:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
thanks guys. all good info and opinions.
I think i will wax it.
Ive put new high octane gas in it and i run it every other day or so.
put it on the tender if it is slow starting. and she cranks right up.
So I think I will not 'winterize' it more than that as I ride every chance the weather allows.
I was just worried about the condensation that occurs with temp changes in my non heated garage.
 

·
Member Map
Joined
·
23,909 Posts
If you are concerned with condensation, it's best not to start it up unnecessarily. Heating the engine then allowing it to cool will be more likely to cause condensation than just leaving it alone.

Higher octane gas does nothing to help storage. A fuel treatment like StaBil or Seafoam is the best bet.

A battery tender designed for storage (not a charger) being plugged in all the time at 1 or 2 amps will keep the battery topped off.

At work we simply use Lemon Pledge to wipe down the motorcycles for storage. Wax is probably better, but we have a fleet of about 400 motorcycles to winterize, so the Pledge is a bit more economical.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
7,516 Posts
Dodsfall is 100% correct: Starting the engine for short periods of time is much worse than not starting it at all.

Funny you mentioned 'lemon pledge.' as I started using that on my bikes in about 1972 and it was fantastic. If sprayed on and not buffed in, it will leave a nice wax coating on the bike that never gets hardened and difficult to remove.

Come on warm weather!!!!

Al Bore, where are you when we need you?:mad:

Sam:):coffeescreen:
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top