Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Rain is such a lively topic I thought I would rant about waterproof claims.
In a nutshell most rain gear leaks, even if it says, 100% waterproof, or like the jacket I just returned, H2Xtreem.

Why? Because the average persons idea of rain, is the short jog from the car to the place of work, or from the kerb to the coffee shop. That's it. If they did not get wet inside the jacket, it is waterproof. But it leaks after standing in the rain for, and now the sales dude looks at the thread count and says. " Sir it is waterproof for so many minutes, and no, it is not absolutely waterproof.

So these days it has to be absolutely waterproof, which I am assuming is one step above 100% waterproof or H2Xtreem or whatever lies are on the label.
Anyone who works outside in a rainy area will know this. To me waterproof or leak proof is something that does not leak. So beware when buying rain gear. The bloody stuff may leak. Maybe not in the first 20 or 30 miles. Oh goody, but your ride is 60 miles.

The oiled cotton/canvas jacket I bought in 1971 does not leak, and the zip and all the buttons still work.
Snow suits are designed for snow. They keep you warm but will probably leak.

When I ask questions about rain gear, or plugs fouling from rain: The responses I get from Southern US folks all say, never had a problem. The British riders all say: Had lots of problems.

I have said before, leather is not a good choice for rain gear. Good for blocking the wind, but you need rain gear on top.
I too have Frog Togs. The black ones. Cheap and effective. Already mentioned on another thread.
A lot of the sailing gear is good quality, but some of that stuff leaks too.
That is why I wear a pair of bib pants made for sailing. They block the wind as well as leather, and keep me dry. The higher bib part is also warmer.

Bon chance. Hope you stay dry in your expensive leak, sorry, rain gear.

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
In the tobacco fields of southern Ontario we used to be able to get a rubberized canvas rain suit that was ABSOLUTELY waterproof but I haven't seen them in decades. I have an Australian Outback slicker that is excellent for all day in a driving rain but unfortunately not suited to riding a motorcycle (plus it weighs 40 pounds!)
 

·
Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
Joined
·
11,518 Posts
If nowhere else it will definitely find it's way in around your neck
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
9,694 Posts
--

I went down to the farmer's market in town and got a 55 gallon plastic ziplock bag for large items. Then I cut two small holes in the bottom and pulled it up over my legs with my boots sticking out of the holes in the bottom. Then I ziplock the top closed and put my helmet on.

I get absolutely no rain coming in at all. Not a drop. Not even in the heaviest of rain. Of course I do run out of air after a few minutes, so I have to stop at each intersection and open the top slightly to let more air in. :wink:

--
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Rain again

If nowhere else it will definitely find it's way in around your neck
That is how it usually gets in with a lot of jackets. But if the choke part of the jacket fits correctly, and you wear a scarf, the water will not get in. A full face helmet also helps. It blocks the rain that would normally hit around your chin and neck.
I stay dry, and I ride in the rain often, and I ride at a good clip.

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Slicker

In the tobacco fields of southern Ontario we used to be able to get a rubberized canvas rain suit that was ABSOLUTELY waterproof but I haven't seen them in decades. I have an Australian Outback slicker that is excellent for all day in a driving rain but unfortunately not suited to riding a motorcycle (plus it weighs 40 pounds!)
The Ozzy slicker is a Johny come lately of the Belstaff and Barbour jackets, made in England. NZ has had them forever as well. Ozz did a good job of marketing tho. I have a made in England slicker. I wear it for short trips up Island sometimes. My bike jacket is a Barbour.

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
Member Map
Joined
·
23,911 Posts
I find that the clothes underneath the rain gear wick water up at the sleeves and pant cuffs. If I am riding in the rain, most of the time it is during a class where my gloves and helmet are removed often.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Rain

I find that the clothes underneath the rain gear wick water up at the sleeves and pant cuffs. If I am riding in the rain, most of the time it is during a class where my gloves and helmet are removed often.
Agreed on both counts.
If I am wearing sweat pants, I tuck them into my boots. If they are the high rubber boots there is no problem. If the leather boots, the boots covers are high enough to keep the water off them. But anything on the outside of the boots, and under the outer rain gear can wick a bit of water. But that can only be the bottom of the leather pants. If I am wearing my ski pants it is below freezing, and no rain.
Removing gloves often in the rain can be a pain. I find they do not go on very easy with wet hands. And with everything else wet, it is hard to dry them.
If you are with a class, can I assume at least it is a bit warmer.

On another thread I mentioned water running down my arms and into the gloves, when riding the sport bike. The thinner the jacket at the cuffs, the bigger the problem. But a thinner jacket would mean warmer weather. My warmer weather gloves fit more snug at the cuffs.
I have several pairs of different style gloves in the tank bag.

How are the class enjoying their rain rides? Can I assume it is a first for many?

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Rain gear

--

I went down to the farmer's market in town and got a 55 gallon plastic ziplock bag for large items. Then I cut two small holes in the bottom and pulled it up over my legs with my boots sticking out of the holes in the bottom. Then I ziplock the top closed and put my helmet on.

I get absolutely no rain coming in at all. Not a drop. Not even in the heaviest of rain. Of course I do run out of air after a few minutes, so I have to stop at each intersection and open the top slightly to let more air in. :wink:

--
My ex and I did a similar thing. We were at a horse cross country event, and it was pissing rain. Was a desert area and we did not take any rain gear. Garbage bags is what we used.

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
Member Map
Joined
·
23,911 Posts
How are the class enjoying their rain rides? Can I assume it is a first for many?
It can be pretty miserable if the temperatures are chilly. Most are new riders that take the BRC. The upside is that it can build confidence that riding in the rain can be done, and gives a good story to tell later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
If you have the money to spend, l have found that backpacking rain gear is totally waterproof if you buy the good stuff. I would feel really confident that l would stay dry in it, because you pay good money to stay dry, especially here in the Northwest, where the most deaths in the wilderness occur in 40 degree rain. Here are a few examples of good ones.

http://www.rei.com/product/865106/eider-target-aero-rain-jacket-ii-mens

http://www.rei.com/product/858346/marmot-spire-rain-jacket-mens

http://www.rei.com/product/855420/arcteryx-beta-lt-jacket-mens#tab-reviews
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
I went to a charity ride Friday when the forecast called for rain and bought a Harley Davidson rain suit for three hundred dollars just in case. I didn't need it but the guarantee is three years if you get wet it is replaced.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top