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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This may be a long shot, or maybe I will get lucky. I need to rebuild the kickstand mounting plate on my 74 Suzuki Prospector TC125.
I am sure other years, or similar vintage TS125/ 185 could also work. Mine is pretty butchered up. I do have the kickstand so eventually could reverse engineer it.
Here is what I am working with.
I didn’t find much detail on the internet.
Thank you

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I could trace out the shape on graph paper if that would help.
Personally I would abandon that spot and bolt one on the other side like all of the light weight side stands I take off my trials bikes.

Your foot peg brackets are in an equally good spot for a side stand too. They can go forward on the bike and still work just fine. You have 3 good strong bolt holes to work with there. You could bolt a quarter inch thick aluminum bracket on that easy to carry side stand and pegs. That would avoid so much welding in that area.
 

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By the way no pressure or anything but close to your countershaft sprocket is one of the highest stressed areas on the motorcycles frame, and you can't put anything on the chain side of the frame.
The original side stand bracket and weld is terrible on all of them and they put it in a terrible place and they made it too short to bracket the frame stronger, it was a missed opportunity and if they had done that you wouldn't have fractured the frame there. Not all of that ugly weld job is your effort.
 

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I haven't started the restore on this one yet. If you need better photos then this, I will need to clean it up nice and move it outside to take them. Holler if you need that.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks that is perfect. In the next couple of days I will sketch it out on graph paper with some measurements and let you critique and compare with yours. Key will be getting the stops relatively close.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok I think I have it drawn to scale. Since it is in 2-d I cannot show the bend angle which seems to be about at 50 degrees. (With frame level)

I used the foot peg mount and the rear swing frame mount as another to triangulate kickstand mount hole.
When I cut out the new mount, I need to make it just a little longer (deeper) to accommodate the angle.

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I would still bridge that where you have written 1-1/8 right behind the foot peg bracket. Then it will never crack there again.

Shape looks perfect, the bracket is made from thicker material then the tube frame so you should be grinding a fillet for the weld so you get penetration on both parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes I will definitely look at supporting the crack.

The bracket measures 5/16” or 7.6mm. Not sure if 5/16 is very standard. 3/8” is too thick I will likely have some good choices to pull some small pieces from the scrap pile at work. Too bad I can’t have them just scan my drawing and cut it out with the laser. I have a friend with a plasma cutter that will work fine as well.
Yes I plan to make a little saddle out of 1/8” to make a sub assembly. I will need to grind a fillet. I may need a couple of practice runs to get it right.
 

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I think the small extra bracket on the back was so they could weld it on at the correct angle in production. The part you are making does have a curve to it, almost like it was cut out of the side of a large cylindrical tube.
 

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What are you welding with, Stick and AC or something fancy?

... it looks a heck of a lot like something I had to make in grade 9 machine shop class.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a little wire feed mig welder mild steel flux wire.
I have everything thing to set it up with gas, but with the flux wire there is no advantage unless I get into aluminum welding.
Nothing fancy but works fine for most everything I need it for.
5/16” is just out of the high end of its range, but if I grind fillets, and do a couple of build passes it should be manageable.
I will do a couple of practice runs to figure out what works best. It is always a pain welding different thicknesses to each other.
 

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You can buy nickel wire for mig can't you :cool:
nickel works good on dissimilar metals and it's way tougher then nails.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So what were the frames made from in the early 70’s? Are they just a mild steel? Based on what I am seeing it doesn’t look like anything special.
I have an alloy wire that is good for carbon steel, mild steel or galvanized.

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So what were the frames made from in the early 70’s? Are they just a mild steel? Based on what I am seeing it doesn’t look like anything special.
I have an alloy wire that is good for carbon steel, mild steel or galvanized.

View attachment 69161
That stuff sux.. when it says gas less I steer clear. IMO...

when you dont use any gas, the wels is contaminated, and likely to be porus and will be brittle like a cookie, and may snap off easily. any time you do any structural welding, it must have gas and good heat for proper panatration to the two surfaces, and the strength of the weld bead.
(y)
But nice work so far!
 

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Semi destructive testing; run one short bead and hit it with a heavy hammer, if it breaks off, new plan, if it holds add more of that weld, that's good stuff.

... I thought 1970's Japanese motorcycle frames were made from crushed and melted down 1960's GM products :unsure: so basically non-virgin recycled metals with a large rust content.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That stuff sux.. when it says gas less I steer clear. IMO...

when you dont use any gas, the wels is contaminated, and likely to be porus and will be brittle like a cookie, and may snap off easily. any time you do any structural welding, it must have gas and good heat for proper panatration to the two surfaces, and the strength of the weld bead.
(y)
But nice work so far!
The flux core wire does help clean the impurities. Plus better for welding outside so the wind doesn’t blow the gas away. Once I have the heat and feed set, it does a nice solid weld.
Anyway at this point I don’t use the welder enough to really justify getting a gas cylinder even though I have the regulators.
So if I find it isn’t working and frustrating me I can reverse the polarity and go buy a gas cylinder. I will be starting with a well cleaned and prepped pieces, so shouldn’t be too bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Since I have the regulator for my welder I may as well go buy a tank. From what I am reading I should be using Argon + Co2. Now the delemma is do I use coppered steel wire which says is recommended for soft and mild steel, or nickel wire. Per my welder book nickel is shown for cast iron.
 

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Since I have the regulator for my welder I may as well go buy a tank. From what I am reading I should be using Argon + Co2. Now the delemma is do I use coppered steel wire which says is recommended for soft and mild steel, or nickel wire. Per my welder book nickel is shown for cast iron.
Nice work so far man..(y)
I gather form your info you have mostly used "gasless" welding.., its ok for some things, but once you get the results from gas welding, you will never go back. I use a 70/30 mix. when you go get a tank, ask for the 70/30 mix, and they will hook you up. they might ask what your welding just answer them "mild steel".

look inside your welder for the chart to help you determing the best wire to use, or even ask the welding shop where you buy the gas from...also remember to adjust your gas regulator before welding anything permantly.

I recomed you use some scrap pieces to get the feel for it and to test your adjustments on first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Making progress. For welding on the frame. .035 is just a little too much bead. I am going to try my .023 wire for my other hairline crack on the other side. For the kickstand side I am ready to form my bottom plate. I will use some heat and a hammer, start it on my anvil and finish form form it right on the frame.

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35 is fine, if your getting too much bead, turn the speed down a hair, and increase the heat settings. the bead width can be controlled and fine tuned by these setting adjustments.

this will form the bead pool faster and allow less material and thus decrease the bead size.

I will also note that sometimes I will use a map gas or propane torch to preheat the welding area red hot just before I start to wed thin metals. I have found this to give exellent results from the start of the weld.
(the welder is not responsible to heat the metal and lays a perfect bead from start)

Looking good man(y), did you do the stint?
 
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