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Discussion Starter #1
My volt meter is reading 10v when hooked up to a battery charger.
I am worried that this undervolt is going to effect the charging system.
I remember school...
sometimes you need a capacitor or resistor to make the meter read true, and that some cheap meters cannot be trusted...

Do you think I have an untrustworthy meter, or do you think I could cap, amp and resist it to read right?
Personally, it was built into the fairing bucket cover when I got it, so I don't really want to replace it.
 

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Just the battery charger, no battery? Many common battery charges just pulse the current to a battery, so your meter would read the average of the pulses, which will be a lot below the set charging voltage. Connect the meter to a battery, note the voltage, then connect the charger; I suspect the voltage will rise, possibly as high as 14V or more. BTW, very few common chargers will safely charge a motorcycle battery. Most MC batteries are in the range of 10 to 16AH, and should not be charged at much above a 2 Amps rate. Few common chargers go this low, and those that will often don't have the ability to shut down enough to keep from boiling a MC battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
battery charging

wow you must have told alot of people that !!! it was really clear!

I have a nice little charger that charges at different settings like 2.6 for motorcycle batteres...

I got a nice tire and wheel for my Xs today off craigslist, great buy.

also got a nice regulator off ebay...

now I have to repair the regulator connector on the harness and test the regulator!
 

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I've been around the sun over 64 times, and an electronics engineer for most of that time, much of that time teaching the new graduates how things REALLY work.

I only use a 'smart' charger, in my case, the Battery Tender brand; I can leave it connected for months without damaging a battery. If yours is just a plain 'dumb' charger, make sure you disconnect it when the battery reaches full charge. Also, if it is a flooded battery, check the water levels often.

Hope you get the charging system working, this time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
one last question

There is a bar in the relay that runs from one of the pins to the nowhere, I think its a jumper to the core of the coil.

zo I is thinkin duh bar is the ground....

the white is conducted to the switch through the diode, and the other two are turned on when the power from the fuse box reaches the relay, and the lights turn on.
 

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So, your resistor symbol is supposed to represent a diode, with the cathode (blue line) on the right; the standard symbol is arrow like ( --|>|-- ).

This makes perfect sense, given the wiring diagrams. When the generator begins putting out current, the relay closes, putting power from the fuse into the blue wire. Then, if the generator voltage drops, that diode is forward biased, and keeps the voltage from the blue wire on the relay coil, latching the relay until the switch that puts power on the fuse is turned off and the engine stops running. This makes sense, as the current from the generator is pulsed, and the latch keeps the relay from pulsing with it. From previous data, this turns the lights on when the engine starts, even when the light switch is off, and keeps them off until the main switch is off. The line on the diode from the generator should be on the end that goes to the relay coil, or it will melt when the relay comes on (as will the one in the relay).

If you set your meter to ohms, you should be able to read a hundred or so ohms from the coil/white wire pin to a ground pin. In diode mode, it should read ~.6V when the positive lead is on the blue wire pin and the negative lead on the coil/white wire pin. Reverse the leads, and it should read open (or nearly so).
 
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