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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I bought this 74 TX650 about 12 months ago as a non goer. It was missing a few bits and looked like it had been parked in the ocean, aluminium was badly pitted and oxidised and steel fittings completely rusted out. At some stage the chain must have come off, a piece was ripped off the top of the top crankcase and the shifter drum bearing housing ground off.

I've done a lot of work on it over the 12months, bought second hand cases, new cam chain and guides, rebore, new pistons , rings and gudgeons, gaskets, seals, stainless fasteners, auto advance unit, plus a heap more parts. Blasted and painted the cases and stuck the motor back together.

I've made a few mods and made a heap of custom parts for it: PMA conversion, single points conversion, ported, remote oil filter and cooler, exhaust pipes and brackets, headlight brackets. Some of the parts I've machined up: Handlebar risers, cable splitter, PMA mounting plate, ally battery box, hand beaten side covers, single seat with cowl, tail light, positive stop nuts, oil filter housing, ally engine mounts and so on.

I do everything myself: Paint, electrical, mechanical, machining, metal polishing, welding, tin work, upholstery, anodising and so on.

This is a project to keep me busy till the end of life, I can never ride it as I have chronic psoriatic arthritis, so fingers have been fused, joints replaced and so on, making for a few limitations and slow progress. With these hands everything takes ten times longer. Luckily, my wife is a good sport, she uses the hammer for me as I can't bash stuff anymore. She also sweeps the floor, cleans my lathe and mill, but shush, she doesn't know I can still do that.

Some pics of my project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I decided to do a PMA conversion on the TX650, but the kits were very expensive. So, I sourced some new parts on ebay: a stator off a Banshee, a rotor off an XV and an XV reg /rect, for all up cost of $130. I then bought a lump of ally and machined up a proper mount for it, instead of using a butchered Banshee mount. Of course I polished the mount so the lektrisity moves quicker.
Timing was a problem, so I reinstalled the original, timed it statically, then removed the original gear and fitted the new PMA. I then fabricated an ally plate, fitted it to the cover and made marks on cover and rotor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The fittings I ordered to complete the oil filter/cooler job arrived today, so I finally connected everything. Looks ok, but a bit of a jumble of hoses. Turned into a rather big job this. Had to make some new engine mounts with room for the filter housing. Machined up the filter housing and threaded stainless parts for plumbing. Machined up a cover to replace the original filter housing cover. Fabricated a bracket to bolt to the engine mounts for the cooler. Drilled and tapped the the engine side cover. Then polished everything - Big job. These AN fittings are very expensive, $50 for two. I ordered them on Aliexpress first for half that, but the seller cancelled the order for some reason and now I'm having trouble getting a dam refund.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Single points conversion. I've converted the twin points system to a single points system. To do this I manufactured a single points backing plate with a lube bushing. Drilled the points bucket at top to route the cable to the coil under the tank. I bought a dual outlet coil, made a bracket for it and mounted it to the original coil mounting frame tab.

The cam proved a little problematic: I turned down a bit of stock to 18mm, filed two ramps on it, then cut the keyway, no luck, timing was was way off. i made a few of these but couldn't get the keyway in the right place. so, I decided to do it in reverse, cut the keyway first, mount the cam, turn the engine over to the firing mark, mark the points heel position on the cam and file away. Then turn the engine over 180degrees and do the same for the second ramp. Super easy this way, I got the timing almost spot on for both cylinders with the same dwell as the original cam.

These cams were available from a number of outlets, but apparently they weren't very accurate, so most outlets no longer carry them in stock.

The first two pictures show the timing for for numbers one and two cylinders, using an LED timing light I put together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
You can see then top engine mount I made for theTX650, in the previous picture. These were formed from a sheet of 6mm all and polished. I also had to spin up some spacers for where they mount to the frame. I'll probably anodise these and the coil bracket later, a bit hard to get to for polishing under the tank.
 

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Seems like a lot of work but I guess it might keep a person out of trouble with too much time on their hands. You got some great skills though. Would you offer to help others for a price? I see others wanting some kind of widget all the time but don’t have the equipment or skills to make it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
This 'will' be the rear wheel, after I spoke it with stainless spokes. The hub was badly corroded, like the rest of the bike, To bring it up to scratch I mounted it on the lathe, trued up the flanges, cut away the casting bridges between the fins and trued up the fins then polished it. The rim was also corroded and had multiple lever gouges and scratches, so I ground down the outer edge of the rim as much as I could and then polished it. I binned the original brake anchor as too ugly and made a new one from 10mm ally. The brake rod and associated components were rusted, so I threaded a length of 6mm stainless rod, machined up a stainless end fitting, adjuster nut and polished them up. Spacers and dust caps were rusted, so they went in the bin and I spun up some stainless spacers, ally dust caps, pressed them together and polished them up. Still have to do something with the brake actuating lever. Should like nice when spoked .
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Front wheel rebuild. Corroded, same as the rear. I mounted the hub on the lathe trued up the flanges and cut away a fair bit of the two bridges so I could get a mop into the corners to polish, then polished the hub. I fabricated an aluminium cover that covers the disk holes on the left side to replace the old rusted steel cover, drilled some go fast holes in the disk, polished the edge of the disk, fitted new stainless allen heads throughout and fitted some sealed bearings. Front rim also had the gouge marks ground off and rim was polished.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Fork rebuild. These needed a lot of work: Badly corroded and the previous owner must have only had a hammer and chisel in his tool box, the seal area was badly gouged, bits broken off and bent out of round. Not much I could do there, other than clean. Both legs had calliper mounts, but as the bike only has one disk, I ground off the mounts on the left leg, No need for the guard stay tabs as I've shortened the front guard, so I also removed the guard mount tabs then ground the legs smooth and polished them up. Whilst I had the innards out, I modified them a little by drilling two holes in each of the damper tubes, supposed to improve fork performance I've read. The stanchions had some deep rust spots up around the lower tree, so I removed the rest and applied some silver paint. As this area can be seen I bought some gaters to cover the area. Bottom tree was painted black, top tree was mirror polished, along with the brake line Junction. Whilst working on the front end I decided to do away with the headlight brackets and made my own from 3mm ally.
 

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Seems like a lot of work but I guess it might keep a person out of trouble with too much time on their hands. You got some great skills though. Would you offer to help others for a price? I see others wanting some kind of widget all the time but don’t have the equipment or skills to make it.
Guess this guy is only going to be a one sided poster. It's a shame he won't reply. Just likes pats on the back I guess.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
I never bothered to start the TX when I got it home, I put au compression gauge on it, the compression was down to around 65 in one, 80 in the other, so I never bothered trying to start it. Instead, I pulled the motor and stripped it down, this is what I found: the auto advance unit was a homemade, bodged up thing, cam chain was stretched, putting the timing out by around 60 degrees. Cam chain guide and adjuster were worn through, carbs were full of gunk, valves seats were pitted, there were a couple of missing pins behind the star on the shifter drum, so no gears, clutch basket was grooved, oil filters were totally gunked up, starter gear spring was loose, there were numerous leaks, the crankcase above the drive sprocket had been torn off, the bearing mount for the shifter drum was damaged, drive sprocket teeth were non existent and the retaining nut looked like Arny had got stuck into it with a sledge.

I had the barrel rebored two sizes over, had the valve seats reground, then sent off for some new parts: new pistons, rings, gudgeons, clips, cam chain guides, auto advance unit, carb kit, new second hand crankcases, gasket kit, seal kit, stainless allen kit, cam chain and probably a few other bits and pieces that I can’t remember now. I had the oil pipe re chromed along with points and auto advance cover. Manufactured a sump filter guard. The rocker shaft bungs are stainless bungs I found on ebay for a fraction of the price of OEMs.

While I was waiting for the parts to arrive, I blasted the cases, barrel, head, rocker cover, and carbs, cleaned them out afterwards with a pressure cleaner about a dozen times. Blew every orifice out at least two dozen times with compressed air and once satisfied they were clean and free of grit I painted the cases, barrel, head and rocker cover silver, polished the side covers, valve caps, dipstick, starter ends, cam chain adjuster housing and breather box, made new pins for the shifter drum, reworked the starter gear spring and started putting it back together in a stand I made for the job.

Once it was all back together, I didn’t fancy starting the motor up on the bench and watch it vibrate itself onto the floor, so I made another stand, with wheels and a rudimentary ignition system. I spun the motor over with my Milwaukee 18 volt drill for a few minutes to get the oil circulated, bolted on what was left of the two into one exhaust, filled the tank, switched it on and hit the starter button. I wasn’t expecting this, but as soon as I hit the starter button, the damn thing roared into life. And by crikey these things are shakers, with the motor going it started walking its way around the workshop, so I pulled out some rope and tied it to the bench grinder stand, then it just jumped up and down every time I gave it a handful. Of course, the carbs were way out of sync, so I put together a manometer and synced the carbs.

End of the engine story: Well, not quite, I thought the motor just looked so bland, so I pulled it apart again, stripped the silver paint off and painted the cases, head, barrel, rocker cover and carb bodies black, polished the carb caps and float bowls then put it back together again with new gaskets. And lo and behold, after priming it, it started straight away again. All good except for a small leak at the base of the barrel. I haven’t fixed that yet, instead concentrating on the frame and fittings.

So, that was the easy bit, the cycle parts have proved never ending, but that's alright, I enjoy my time in the workshop. Being a DIY kind of guy, I insist on doing everything myself, the only diversion from that was taking the frame out for blasting. So to come: New exhaust, seat pan with cowl, ally battery carrier, ally side panels, modified guards, ally tail light, ally brake anchor, stainless brake linkage, ally engine mounts, ally remote filter housing and mounting hardware, risers, cable splitter, ally coil mount, mods to the frame for side panel tabs and battery box mounting, modified fork legs, painting, and did I mention polishing, lots and lots of that: rims, hubs, forks, tree, brake collector, risers, side panels, tail light, battery box, battery retainer, brake ancho, brake backing plate, dust covers, wheel spacers, carbs, valve covers, breather box, cam chain adjuster, carbs, side covers, PMA mount, starter ends, dipstick, remote filter and cooler fittings. In between jobs it was back to the engine for a PMA mount, reg/rect mount, single point conversion, carb sync adjusters, plus a few more bits and pieces.

I can never ride the bike, it’s just a workshop project, so there is no end planned. I’m reaching the end of my time anyway, so after I’m gone the wife can sell it and maybe get some bucks for it, along with all my tools and machinery. I’d really love to take it all with me, but I’ve been told that’s simply not feasible!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Started the TX up the other day to see if my mods work ok. Bike roared into life a second after pushing the start button. Single points and point cam work beautifully as does the PMA, ignition wiring and cable splitter. Carbs were out of course, but after I synced them the motor ran sweet as a lolly: Idled smoothly at very low revs and reved cleanly. Very happy.


I nutted out a simplified schematic for the TX last night and did a little work on it today. Rather than one harness, I decided on two, one for lights and one for ignition and charging. Five wires for the lights run up the left side of the backbone for lights, another three run up a harness on the right for ignition. I've included some earth cabling in the harness rather than just depending on earthing through the frame.

Once I've routed all the cables to their destinations, I'll zip tie them then wrap the harness removing the zips as I go. Having one harness for ignition and charging circuits and another for lighting simplifies fault faulting and cuts down on the number of colours needed in the harnesses.

I've ordered some stainless spokes, should be here this week. Can only get front spokes at the moment for some reason, seems to be a shortage on rears. As soon as they arrive I'll repolish the hub and rims and spoke it up.
 

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