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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm on a sportsbike ( Honda car 500r), and I have been having trouble with turning into a parking lot when there's a dip and then an upward slope. I've always recovered successfully, but I feel a slip and go wide. What is the best method for doing this? I know to not brake, especially with the front brake, but what should I be doing with the clutch and throttle?
 

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I'm not sure I understand why you would slip and go wide unless your tires are very hard or low on tread but as far as control inputs:

I'd suggest keeping the throttle neutral, hands and arms loose (I tend to tense up in that area when nervous or excited), and the bike as upright as possible. In other words, stay relaxed, leave throttle and brakes alone, and coast over that section. Oh, and make sure you aren't fixating on that area but looking beyond it.

Hope that helps!
 

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Save them all!
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I think I get what you're saying - try to hit the dip/hill at as steep an angle as possible - as close to 90 degrees as you can.

It's a bit like uneven lanes.
 

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I think I get what you're saying - try to hit the dip/hill at as steep an angle as possible - as close to 90 degrees as you can.

It's a bit like uneven lanes.
That's kind of like what I was thinking. If the rider is going to hit the dip and then go up hill during a turn, hit the dip upright, then lean it over to continue on.
 

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Very Famous Person
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--

If I interpret correctly, you are essentially hitting a bump. How do you normally handle bumps? Do you stiffen up? Sit on the seat and flail your legs? Or maybe stand on the pegs and let the bike move under you? If you chose the last one, then maybe try to do the same on any big disruption.

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Ace Tuner
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No, no, no. You guys got it all wrong...
The thing to do is close your eyes and gas it. :devil:
Flailing your arms and legs while screaming only helps a little but the spectators really love it so don't forget to do that part.
 

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No, no, no. You guys got it all wrong...
The thing to do is close your eyes and gas it. :devil:
Flailing your arms and legs while screaming only helps a little but the spectators really love it so don't forget to do that part.
I did that once. But the spectators only gave 5 points because I forgot to take off my training wheels.:crying:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all your replies. I will focus on putting my weight on the pegs like I do for bumps at higher speeds. What gear do you generally do a turn like this in? First or second? And if first then would you recommend holding the clutch in for the coasting over it part? I ask because first gear seems very jerky for me and to just roll off the throttle in first always feels like a very dramatic slow down.
 

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American Legion Rider
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What gear you choose depends on the torque of your machine. Most will use 1st gear if you are taking it slow but if you take it a little faster maybe 2nd gear. Just down bog the engine down. More rpms is better than too few. I can start in 2nd gear with my Indian so I'd most likely just use 2nd gear by this bike is very torquey. I'd suggest you use 1st gear until you are more sure of this dip and slope and then try 2nd gear. Then make your own decision as to which one feels better to you.
 

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Ace Tuner
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Thanks for all your replies. I will focus on putting my weight on the pegs like I do for bumps at higher speeds. What gear do you generally do a turn like this in? First or second? And if first then would you recommend holding the clutch in for the coasting over it part? I ask because first gear seems very jerky for me and to just roll off the throttle in first always feels like a very dramatic slow down.
"would you recommend holding the clutch in for the coasting over it part?"

No.
You can use engine power and engine braking to help control the bike. It just takes practice, you'll get a handle on it in time.
 

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Honda Gold Wing Service Specialist
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Another thing to consider as part of the issue may be "target fixation".

In case you don't know, target fixation is the natural tendency for the brain to tell the rider's eyes to look directly at a road hazard instead of looking at a way around that hazard.

Another fact about riding is that your bike will go where you are looking. So, make a conscious effort to look where you want to go and not look at whatever it is in the road that you are trying to avoid.

I've been riding for over 50 years and can still fall victim to target fixation if I am not mindful of it at the very moment a hazardous situation arises.

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