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While patching my first flat, it occurred to me that the puncture wouldn't have flattened a tubeless tire. It was caused by a smooth round wire that would have simply filled the hole it made in the tire, and at most would have been a very slow leak. As it turned out, the end of the wire snagged the tube and tore a nice small hole which released all the air in short order.

As a result, I am wondering how much more frequently tube tires go flat than tubeless tires. I'm particularly interested in how this applies to motorcycle tires, since I don't carry a spare.
 

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Veryfried
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carry a tyreweld, or flatmate, or whatever you call them there.
i have a 300ml one under the seat - been caught out before.
was told you have more chance of a blow-out with a tube than tubeless.

only major flats ive had have been where the tube has gone down a bit, crept round the rim & BANG, ripped the valve out.
worst was coming off a roundabout and the tyre came off the rim completely on the sprocket carrier side.

very hard to push a bike with a flat!
 

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While patching my first flat, it occurred to me that the puncture wouldn't have flattened a tubeless tire. It was caused by a smooth round wire that would have simply filled the hole it made in the tire, and at most would have been a very slow leak. As it turned out, the end of the wire snagged the tube and tore a nice small hole which released all the air in short order.

As a result, I am wondering how much more frequently tube tires go flat than tubeless tires. I'm particularly interested in how this applies to motorcycle tires, since I don't carry a spare.
What makes you think that? I have had as many flats on tubeless as I have on tube type. Fact is I've only had one flat on my KLX with 43,000+ miles running tube type on all sorts of roads. I've had more flats with tubes only because I had more miles on tubes.

The only difference is usually the speed at which the tire deflates and that is usually due to most tube types having the spoke holes for the air to leak out. If you put sealant in a tube that will even close the gap further.

It seems screws, nails, wire, and other debris aren't attracted only to one type of tire. The only difference between a tube type tire and a tubeless is an inner membrane that seals off any leaks that might be in the carcass before coating it. Believe it or not, I have a set of Bridgestone tires on my truck, one had the tinyest leak in the sidewall... pin hole in the membrane that leaked through the sidewall... on a tubeless. No damage or anything, just a leak. We put a can of sealant in the tire and now all's peachy.

With some sealant in a tube type I went 60 miles airing the tire up twice along the way going home from school. It had a flat piece of metal that punctured the tube several times when it moved around under low pressure. I had a screw stuck in a new Yokohama tubeless sport tire on my Nighthawk S that deflated faster than that. I had a tube type on an SR500 (cast spoke wheels) that got a nail in it and the tire went down slowly like a tubeless might - no spoke holes.

Nothing is fixed, nothing is better or best when it comes to dealing with flats. It's purely luck of the draw, fate, moon phases. Some people can run tubes endlessly like I have without issues for the longest time, others can have flats galore on tubeless tires with cast wheels.
 

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It's impossible to say which tire is most likely to go flat. It depends on the rider, the area he's riding in and the condition of the tires.

I, personally, feel it's best to have tubeless tires. If I run over a nail or a screw, I can repair the area (when I'm on the road) with a small repair kit. Just as with an car, I have plugs to put in where the leak is located. Then the tire can be inflated using CO2 cartridges. In order to repair a tube type tire, the tire must be broken free from the tire rim, the tube then would be pulled out out of the wheel and the hole patched. That's quite a task.

CD
 

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While patching my first flat, it occurred to me that the puncture wouldn't have flattened a tubeless tire. It was caused by a smooth round wire that would have simply filled the hole it made in the tire, and at most would have been a very slow leak. As it turned out, the end of the wire snagged the tube and tore a nice small hole which released all the air in short order.

As a result, I am wondering how much more frequently tube tires go flat than tubeless tires. I'm particularly interested in how this applies to motorcycle tires, since I don't carry a spare.
Carry an AMA card and quit worrying. Free towing up to 35 miles for all your vehicles, free road side assistance. Best investment if you ride.
 
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