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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm a new rider. Just bought a 1969 Honda CB160 and it won't start. I test rode it two weeks ago, but I had to jump start it then.

I'm trying to figure out if the battery is dead. When I first put the key in the ignition the green neutral light came on, once I tried kick starting it a few times the green light faded away.

This bike has been ridden intermittenly over the past few months by the previous owner.

What can I do to get my bike going?
 

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American Legion Rider
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22,174 Posts
Yep, sounds like battery. Won't hurt to clean and tighten the connections but you probably need a new battery. If you don't have a battery tender you might think about that too. There are some that can recharge as well as maintain. Would come in handy right now.
 

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Eating GSXRs, Sh***ing CBRs
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Places like Advanced Auto Parts or (shudder) Autozone will test the battery for free. Though you have to take their results with a grain of salt. Last summer, my ZX9R wouldn't start and I ended up having Advanced Auto test the battery. They said it was fine. After checking out everything else I replaced the battery anyway and it ran fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry for the late response. I got a new battery and rebuilt the carbs, now it's starting easily, but the battery isn't working at full potential and dies after a quick ride.

Should I replace the stator or the regulator/rectifier?

Thanks-
 

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Should I replace the stator or the regulator/rectifier?
That would depend on which one is failing. You will need a multimeter to test the charging system.

I would start at the battery itself and check the voltage with the motorcycle off, at idle, and at about 3000 RPM.

Test for voltage at the regulator. Next unplug both sides of the regulator and test for continuity through the regulator. You will have to check with the service manual on how each connection should behave as to continuity.

Lastly test for voltage at the stator connection. This will be alternating current, and voltages can get pretty high, increasing with RPM. Again, check the service manual for how much voltage you should be seeing at certain RPMs.
 
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