Motorcycle Forum banner

21 - 30 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
454 Posts
Well....anybody who wants mine can have it. It just sits in my garage. Only used it a couple times and both times it didn't work. I usually hand tighten the bolts/plugs,etc now, then give them a little bit of a turn. How much depends on if it's a spark plug, drain plug, etc. And I've never had a problem. Last time I used the torque wrench on my bike it was the oil drain plug. Stripped it and had to repair it with a timesert(awesome kits). Never again.
 

·
Shaper Of All Things Metal
Joined
·
2,802 Posts
Just curious why you kept going until you stripped the threads if you have a 'good feel' for tightening... didn't you suspect a faulty wrench at some point before the threads stripped?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
454 Posts
If you use one only once or twice a year,why not rent one from a tool rental place.
I'm assuming your post is a reply to my post cause I said I only used it twice. I never said I only used it that many times per year. I said I used it that many times period(and then gave up). I have three bikes so my torque wrenches get used a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
454 Posts
Just curious why you kept going until you stripped the threads if you have a 'good feel' for tightening... didn't you suspect a faulty wrench at some point before the threads stripped?
That was before I learned to do spark plugs and oil drain plugs by hand. Better to under tighten, see a small leak, and tighten a little more then rely on a harbor freight torque wrench as a "precision tool". I'm sure a lot of seasoned riders would agree with me about not using a torque wrench for spark plugs, drain plugs, small bolts that are approx. 10-15 ft lbs
 

·
ZAMM Fanatic
Joined
·
2,730 Posts
If ya buy a clicker you need to dial the torque back down to zero before you put it back in the toolbox EVERY time.

There's nothing wrong with an old beam style Craftsman you can pick up in any pawn shop for $10.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
20,060 Posts
I don't have trouble with foot pound torque, but I have no feel for inch pound except to use two fingers instead of a full grip. So it's torque wrench time for those nuts, bolts and screws that require the light touch. Instead of my normal brute force approach.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,133 Posts
Why pros use calibrated torque wrenches.

torque is the same for both metric and sae... but where you are considering a wrench to do the dirty work for you, there are two things that need said. First thing----the distance that a wrench travels on the radius is not torque. Second thing----the pressure applied to the wrench is not torque.

torque is the amount of pressure that it takes to lever a 1 foot long bar, 1 foot. so if you think of it as a single amount, a final figure in the calc to hold somethng together its alot easier.

Mostly torque is knowing how much you weigh, and how to use it.
Think of riding along down the highway and into a corner, the g's you feel could be considered a torque of sorts.

If you shift your weight back what happens to the torque? It lightens...right.
If you shift your weight forward what happens to the torque? It gets heavier...right.

Now here is this little scrawny smartalec kid on his two wheeler who couldn't tighten a lug on a car wheel with a fancy gizmo that he thinks is supposed to tighten the bolts to theys weren't comin offa there...

Assuming the rider(SSKOHTWCTALOACW?) weighs about 120lbs? If that kid leans on a 1/4" bolt with a 6" breaker bar he can twist it right off... strip the threads? well on a steel case engine, you won't strip the threads, you will either twist it off, take some hide off your knuckles, or bust your wrench.

OK noid, how far do you turn a 6" bar on a 1/4" bolt to get 1lb of torque? (wrong!!! totally wrong!!)

Thats why you need a torque wrench, but forgetting that you ate pizza all week can change your torquing ability until you think your wrench fails.

THE BEST KIND OF TORQUE WRENCH IS A CALIBRATED ONE. MOST TORQUE WRENCHES ARE JUST SPRING STEEL WITH A graduated scale attached to them(calibrated to know what torque hits what mark.)
A.
watch your body weight. place the wrench on the bolt nut what ever.
b.
steady the wrench so it only goes in one direction, and stabilize your body weight so it doesn't shift when you apply the pressure.
c.
carefully read the calibrated scale as the wrench twists on the bolt nut whatever. when you get the right calibration, you will know, you wiill be happy and swami ben mahali will speak in your ear...."you have finally done it this time" and you will know that the cost of the wrench far exceded the need for a computer forum full of old geezers like me who like to order little farty so and sos around....!!!:thumbsup: go get a torque wrench and you won't be required to read all this BS!!!!!:smiley_mornincoffee GET 2 one of the clickers and one of the bendy kind...then get 2 more.. one for inch lbs and a spare for your buddy....
 
21 - 30 of 30 Posts
Top