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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Reading a response by Gator Joe this morning in another thread, in which he said, "I Ride Year Round so Winter doesn't really have any effect..........." made me wonder what that's like.

Is it as simple as "take the example of riding for 9 months out of the year, and just figure it never ending," in examination?

What's it LIKE..........to ride all year round? Is it basically the "same" or does your maintenance schedule change? What nuances to riding year round are brought to bear when you NEVER have to put the bike away (except perhaps in a typhoon or Hurricane)?

More miles on the odometer, to be sure. Wearing out your gear faster I suppose. Your accident odds increase I would think? Do you pay more for Insurance than the National Average, because you can ride year round?

On face value, I can answer the question myself I guess, but I'd like to hear from those who, like Gator Joe, ride all year round. I wonder if there are a percentage of riders who "burn out" on riding, when there is nothing standing in the way of riding for the whole year.

When you are out looking for a "used" bike, in an area where they DO ride "year round," should I presume that the bikes I will see for sale, have higher mileage on them, given the area?

Do prices of bikes and gear, tend to be higher or lower in a year-round riding environment? Is the market flooded more, in year-round riding areas? Are there better deals to be had, in these areas, BECAUSE of the "year-round" aspect of that given area?

Because of limited annual riding up North here, the BRC and other courses are not offered year round, and so the classes are maxed out, and hard to get into. Is that the case in "year-round" riding areas, or are there lighter class sizes and more of them where you don't have seasonal interruptions?

-Soupy
 

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Swamp Rat Rider
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Nice one of my remarks inspired a thread .. :) Being Retired is a Big Factor even if lived up North and stayed up there due to Family or other reasons .. Would still have More miles than Most because I love Riding and don't miss many days .. I never really looked into the Insurance thing other than I know pay a lot less than some I have read about comparing rates .. I just got my Bill from Allstate is due in Feb .. $393.03 for both for 1 Year the Scout and Vic Cross Country .. $165.19 for the Vic , $222.80 for the Scout even though is Less Book Value Just the Difference having no ABS, possibly a couple other reasons, the Scout is More .. This is Full Coverage 100,00-300,000, Collision, Comprehensive, and all that Jazz .. $500.00 Deductible which brings it way down from the original $100.00 .. Will also add Location makes a difference in FL My Insurance went down at least 1/3 when moved from Tampa to Lake City ..
When we meet in Jan just ask me is I get burnt out from Riding think from the way I would laugh the answer would be obvious ..
On Bike and Gear Prices there are Good deals to be found in FL yes, but won't say is a Location thing there, can find them anywhere if just do the right kind of looking or just get Lucky ..
Will let someone else chime in about the Class Course thing, it's a whole new animal now that FL requires a MSF Course to get your endorsement regardless of age .. But would bet they have plenty of them ..
 

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American Legion Rider
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I rode year round in California and for the most part still do in Texas. Quite frankly you never even think about it being any different. You can find sales or bargains any time not just one or two times a year. There is always someone that just wants out. Because they got more bike than they could handle or worse, crashed. If anything I thought insurance was less since you don't have the re-learn phase all the time as far as handling your bike.

The only bike difference for me in Texas now versus Cali is in Cali you never worried about planning a trip with a group. Set the date and go. Here, you can set a date but better have one or two backup dates. Many here do park their bikes. Why I don't know except they, to me, aren't really bikers or riders. What ever you want to call that thing called riding motorcycles.

I still don't think about the differences except when I start seeing those that really can't ride start talking about it. It really is something you don't think about. At least I don't think many do anyway.
 

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I'm fortunate enough to live where I can ride rear round, It rarely get down in the 20's here. I don't change anything with my bikes I just dress warmer.
 

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I ride year around here too. I rode Friday but yesterday left the bike home because rain at 40 degrees is unpleasant. Today the forecast is for temperatures hovering around freezing so it is another decent riding day for me. The rain has blown through and no rain or snow in today's forecast.
 

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Gone.
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When I moved to the non-helmet state of Florida from a helmet-required state my insurance went down and my coverage was better.

Walmart blue jeans and Harley shirts cost about the same everywhere, so the cost of proper gear didn't change.

There are more bikes down here so it seems to be a more motorcycle friendly environment. People on bikes, especially if they look like me, don't seem to stand out any more then anyone else. I don't get followed by store security around here.

There's no pressure to cram in as many miles every day as I can. If the weather is chilly or rainy there's no feeling of loss if I choose not to ride and stay comfortable.
 

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Year round

I ride year round, but pick my days. Sometimes I have a ride scheduled, like Tuesday, and it seems the temperature drops just for me. Been around 40 lately, but dropping to 32 on Tuesday and warming again Wednesday. Rain is a pain but does not slow me down much.
I use my 83 XS400 mostly for the winter. I bolt the side car to the bigger XS11. That becomes the truck, to fetch supplies when needed. Insurance for both, opposition only, is about $380- which is too much.
I oil the chain often and adjust not very often. Bike gets filthy, which would upset me if it was new. Mufflers and pipes tend to rust, the forks can rust, stuff goes green. The more stuff you own, the more maintenance you have, and the more stuff depreciates. I am slowly working on reducing inventory. Small stuff, I donate to the Island recycle, resell place. Plans for 2015 is to sell the 28 and 22 foot sail boats. Then build a garage and move in.
The XS11 will get a new tank and paint. The XS400 will get new tyres with more aggressive tread.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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Greatest Member Ever
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When I moved to the non-helmet state of Florida from a helmet-required state my insurance went down and my coverage was better.

Walmart blue jeans and Harley shirts cost about the same everywhere, so the cost of proper gear didn't change.

There are more bikes down here so it seems to be a more motorcycle friendly environment. People on bikes, especially if they look like me, don't seem to stand out any more then anyone else. I don't get followed by store security around here.

There's no pressure to cram in as many miles every day as I can. If the weather is chilly or rainy there's no feeling of loss if I choose not to ride and stay comfortable.

Gee Eye... When I read your first sentence, I thought I was going senile. I grew up in Florida and moved away in the 90's. Helmets were mandatory. So I googled it and found that Fla changed the law July 1, 2000. Nice to see a state giving freedom of choice instead of taking it away!!

Now, as for Soupy's OP... I thought I would have some insight. Then I realized that I have never lived in a state that you can't ride all year round. I don't know what it's like to have to park my bike for months at a time.

I sold my cage over 2 years ago, so I've been 2 wheeling ever since.By selling my car, my gas bill, insurance, registration and maintenance bills have decreased drastically. As for "riding gear", I think like Eye. I do tend to wear out more flip-flops (rubber slippahs, as the locals call em) tho.
 

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I'm not riding as much as I did when I first got a bike 6 years ago, but a lot of that is due to my health....occasionally I will still just "go for a ride. just for a ride" but most of my riding is to the grocery store, to run short errands or other short trips like that....5-10 miles a trip....

I also prefer to ride at night (in the summer) because there are less people around on the roads, in stores, ect.
 

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So long
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I ride nearly every day year round. Winter here is mild compared to Northern states. January temps average between 30°F to 50°F.

Soupy, to explain what it's LIKE for me I have to ask you to imagine a brisk Connecticut October that's mostly sunny and snow-free. Now imagine that lasting until spring and you skipped winter. Now imagine you're retired and free to ride every day. That's what it's LIKE!

Like others said, you have to dress accordingly. Although my bike is classified as a sport tourer, it is more of a sport roadster with little wind protection. My winter wear consists of a leather jacket with a thermal zip in liner and leather pants. I wear Reebok running tights as a base layer under my leathers. A full face helmet is my standard year round choice, but for winter riding I add a balaclava to keep my neck and chin warm. Thick wool ski socks and Sidi boots keep my feet cozy. Getting caught in the rain is no big deal in the summer, but in the winter it's a good way to catch a cold. So, if it rains I wear my bright orange Harley rainsuit.

I keep to the same maintenance schedule year round and run my BMW shop's standard bulk 5W-40 synthetic racing oil. My Beemer is liquid cooled and I run the same type of coolant year round. I also run the same Metzeler Sportec M5 Interact tires year round.

There are some nuances to winter riding. Before I even get rolling I turn on the heated grips! Once rolling I keep in mind that cold tires and cold roads mean less traction. It didn't matter so much when I rode the Harley, but the Beemer has nearly triple the ponies and will light 'em up if you go wild with the throttle (but, it is FUN!).

I can't say year round riding means used bikes have higher milage. I bought my current bike in Raleigh. It was 5 years old and only had 15,000 miles on it. I later got to know the previous owner. He has multiple bikes. That's common here.

Prices seem reasonable here and markets for gear or bikes aren't flooded. There are more bikes but also more riders, so the laws of supply and demand seem in balance.

Similar to what Eye said about Florida, I've found North Carolina very bike friendly.
 

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I do ride all year round, but less at this time of year. It's nice and cool today - rained last night - 33 deg C (just over 90 deg F) and 55% humidity, positively balmy. You feel the blast of the sun when you stop and you're not in the shade. I suit up, put my helmet and gloves on, in the shed and ride out to generate as much wind as possible as soon as possible.

In the winter, which is our "dry" season (max temp about 25 deg C/77 deg F, I wear all the same gear as I do in the summer which is the "wet" season", mesh armoured jacket, draggin jeans, steel capped boots, gloves and helmet (mandatory). Though I don't ride at all when it's persisting down, which can last for a week or so, or when there's a cyclone (hurricane/typhoon) coming.

So I do slightly more riding during our winter (at the same time as your summer), and ride as often as I can during our summer (at the same time as your winter). Right now it's a treat to ride through the countryside, all the sugar cane has been harvested and the new growth is only half a metre or so high (2 ft) so you can see over the cane for miles. Once the cane has grown up to about 2 1/2 metres (8 ft) then it seems as if you're riding through canyons of the bloody stuff.

Don't notice any difference in the price of gear, though I suppose the bike shops have post-Xmas sales, but if you're looking for a bike then you look down south when winter is coming. No-one I know winterises their bike, or parks their bike up over the winter or the wet.
 

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I ride year round in Arizona. The winter here is nice but it does still get cold. No snow or anything in phoenix but it will get in the low 30's or high 20's at night. I work graveyard so I get stuck at the worst time riding. Most of the winter so far the low has only been in the 40's which I can tolerate but this week has been the coldest. Summer riding here is alright but it is extreme at times. Always have sun block on hand and apply it regularly. Monsoon season you might get stuck if you don't pay attention to the weather but it's not terrible.
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #14
I ride year round in Arizona. The winter here is nice but it does still get cold. No snow or anything in phoenix but it will get in the low 30's or high 20's at night. I work graveyard so I get stuck at the worst time riding. Most of the winter so far the low has only been in the 40's which I can tolerate but this week has been the coldest. Summer riding here is alright but it is extreme at times. Always have sun block on hand and apply it regularly. Monsoon season you might get stuck if you don't pay attention to the weather but it's not terrible.
Might be fun to ride the Apache Trail on a dirt bike. Did the whole circuit by car in 2003. Phoenix was a neat place. Also saw Scottsdale and Sedona. Sedona was a LOT like Connecticut in terms of vegetation, grass, water, elevation..........

Alice Cooper's Restaurant was a kick!!

-Soupy
 

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There is plenty of time I can't/won't ride during the winter, but there is a bike ready to go year round.

I don't think moving to a non-helmet law state has anything to do with a reduction in insurance rates. There are different rates from area to area, and a simple change in insurance company can make a big difference.

BTW, 2000, Florida is lagging behind.
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #16
...............I don't think moving to a non-helmet law state has anything to do with a reduction in insurance rates.......
I would tend to agree that that statement doesn't make sense. In a "no helmet required" State, I'd think the Insurance Rates would be higher, due to the more likely probability of death or severe disability, in an accident, when NOT wearing one.

If I were the Insurance Company, "I" certainly would want the rates higher when a helmet isn't required!

-Soupy
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #18
I don't know why my rates are lower or my coverage better, nor do I much care. lol. It was just a nice surprise that I'm enjoying. :thumbsup:
Rates drop as you remain accident free. Progressive (for example) even has that plug-in thingy that records your driving speed and so forth, and the Insurance company (supposedly) gives you rate reductions for accumulated evidence of "responsible driving."

They also gauge "rates" on age, and other factors.

-Soupy
 

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Rates drop as you remain accident free. Progressive (for example) even has that plug-in thingy that records your driving speed and so forth, and the Insurance company (supposedly) gives you rate reductions for accumulated evidence of "responsible driving."

They also gauge "rates" on age, and other factors.

-Soupy
my daughter had one of those plug in deals, it made it real easy for me to see where she was driving at any time of the day, and yes, she did get a small discount (it could have been a bigger discount, but she discovered that the harder she pushed on that pedal, the faster she got to where she was going)
 
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