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The rear tire on Yami looses air, a few pounds in two weeks. If any of the folks have a tire like this, and are not checking now and then. You could have a problem.
Dunlop 404. The front end also has a chatter, and I suspect the tire is the problem. I will switch from the Dunlops for the next set.
Might be a year before my report on this.

I have the same tires on my XS400, but it does not go as fast. 92 flat out, but no problems to report.

UK
 

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The rear tire on Yami looses air, a few pounds in two weeks. If any of the folks have a tire like this, and are not checking now and then. You could have a problem.
Dunlop 404. The front end also has a chatter, and I suspect the tire is the problem. I will switch from the Dunlops for the next set.
Might be a year before my report on this
.

I have the same tires on my XS400, but it does not go as fast. 92 flat out, but no problems to report.

UK
If the chatter, which I assume means vibration, is at all speeds you are probably correct. But just at one, I wouldn't think so. To me, that would be a balance issue. The beads you used should have work though.

You might have to find someone that can do a real spin balance. Or you can take your time trying to get in perfect at home if you have a way to let the heavy part go to the six o'clock area when checking.

There are several homemade ways to do this if you check YouTube. You'll need one with the least resistance. But it can be done. Or, you might be right and it's the tire. If it is the tire, Dunlop should make it good. But I wouldn't wait a year though.
 

On The Road Again!
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Just the name Dunflop makes me suspect the tire. The Dunflops I had on my Goldwing were terrible.
Put a Michelin on there. You'll love it. The difference is night and day.
 

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Just the name Dunflop makes me suspect the tire. The Dunflops I had on my Goldwing were terrible.
Put a Michelin on there. You'll love it. The difference is night and day.
Post 23 as well.
The Dunlops have never given me a secure feeling especially in the rain. I have Michelin on Noddy the Triumph. Rode in heavy rain a couple of weeks ago. They do feel secure, and are good for long sweeping corners in the dry. Actually better for all cornering.
Noddy has better suspension than Yami.

The front wheel was balanced with beads. The chatter was bad. We removed the beads and balanced it with weights. The bike shop did it. My book on suspension points to the tire. It might also be a suspension issue. I will be trying different oil in the forks, and quantity, and different air pressure.

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Want to calibrate a pressure gauge with common household articles?

One could use a mercury filled column, such as is used to balance carburetors.
1 psi = 2.036 inches of mercury.

You say you don't have enough mercury to fill a 4 foot tube and besides it's toxic? How about water?

1 psi = 2.307 feet of water.

Hang your 50 foot garden house from a tall tree. When water comes out the high side, you have 50 / 2.310 = 21.7 psi on the low side.

The top end of the column needs to be open. When using an air gauge to measure pressure on a fluid column, be sure to have an air pocket that the gauge connects to. You don't want water in your gauge.

If you have city water, your local water utility can probably tell you within a few psi what pressure they deliver. Likely this will be somewhere between 40 and 65 psi. The gauge on your shop air compressor is likely to be more accurate than any hand held gauge, in my opinion.
 

Visionary
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32 pounds for a Goldwing! That's amazingly low!
I know for a fact that a Goldwing weighs about the same as a Vision and uses the exact same tire sizes and ratings, but for a Vision the factory pressures are 38 front, 40 rear. They came with Dunlop E3s, now I run e4s

I run 39-40 front, 41-42 rear, any less and it feels weird.


Absolutely right, Hog.
Honda's manual says something like 32 pounds for my Goldwing.
Damned thing handles like a truck at that pressure. Awful!
All the Goldwing forums tell you to run 41 pounds. They are right.
The bike handles GREAT like that!
I can tell immediately if the tire pressure drops even by two pounds
or so, as the bike becomes harder to handle and less pleasant to ride.
 

Charlie Tango Xray
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I have a quality pen gauge stashed on each motorcycle. And with the advent of the built in pressure monitors on all the cars now, I carry a better digital gauge in the glove box of every car and the truck. My compressors have pressure gauges on the filler tips, and I'll check that with a quality digital gauge.
 

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I use AstroAI digital tire pressure gauge. It's a cost-effective tool with a variety of functionalities for easy use. Its brilliant green illuminated display in particular appeals to me. Aside from providing an accurate reading to the tenth decimal place, the display makes it easier to see in low-light circumstances. This feature also displays precise data, making it easier to keep track of your tire's condition.
 

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I use AstroAI digital tire pressure gauge. It's a cost-effective tool with a variety of functionalities for easy use. Its brilliant green illuminated display in particular appeals to me. Aside from providing an accurate reading to the tenth decimal place, the display makes it easier to see in low-light circumstances. This feature also displays precise data, making it easier to keep track of your tire's condition.
Funny, but this post smells like advertisement...

All you need is a gage that is easy to get onto the tire valve and tells you what the pressure is in the tire, the rest of that is just a toy.

An accurate reading to the tenth decimal place is an absolutely ridiculous claim.
 

Visionary
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Funny, but this post smells like advertisement...

All you need is a gage that is easy to get onto the tire valve and tells you what the pressure is in the tire, the rest of that is just a toy.

An accurate reading to the tenth decimal place is an absolutely ridiculous claim.
Yeah, the post does look a bit spammy, if it contained a link I think it would have crossed the line.
Coincidentally I use the same brand of gauge, for the record it works well and BTW, it reads to 1/10th of a pound, not to the tenth decimal place..that's CRAZY..lol
Now I sound like a spammer :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Since my last post in this thread over two years ago, I recently purchased this inexpensive Slime one thats worked pretty good over the last year or so. One pound accuracy is good enough for me.
 

Administrator - American Legion Rider - KA5LRS
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Go cheap and buy 3 pencil type gauges and the use the one that reads in the middle of all 3. Or go expensive and buy 3 digital gauges then use the one that reads in the middle. Point it, gauges all read different. So use what you have, put in what the owners manual says, then adjust for best performance and use that amount from then on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Go cheap and buy 3 pencil type gauges and the use the one that reads in the middle of all 3. Or go expensive and buy 3 digital gauges then use the one that reads in the middle. Point it, gauges all read different. So use what you have, put in what the owners manual says, then adjust for best performance and use that amount from then on.
Thats exactly what I did with the three round analog gauges, the ones I originally posted about.
 
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