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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just curious what everyone else uses. I have several gauges from a couple of stick gauges, to round analog gauges, to a 10 year old digital gauge that is one of the two primary gauges that I use. Both stick gauges seem to be the most inaccurate comparing to the others. The three round analog gauges are all within 1 to 2 lbs of each other. The digital is right there in the middle of the three, so the digital one and the middle analog gauge are the two that I use. The rest of them just sits in one of my tool box drawers in the garage. What do you use and find to be the most accurate?
 

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I went to local tire dealers and compared my analog w/hose to their gauges which each considered "accurate". They all varied from mine. So I decided to use my $200. tpms wheel gauge sender-to-monitor style measure as the most accurate. I had previously called the company and they have assured me on no uncertain terms that their gauge is "exactly right on". Any that have come back under warranty because of inaccuracy have been shown to actually be correct.

So who's gauge to believe. My analog gauge reads 3# over the tpms, so I fill my tires to 3# over what I want. Then when cold, they read where they should be. Thing is anyway, that they always heat up to as much as 6# over cold when riding, so I don't worry if starting is a tad low.

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All we can do is compare several, and estimate the best from the results, unless you have access to a calibration tool. All my digitals agree to within 1/2psi, so I suspect they are pretty good.
 

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I have all sorts plus TPMS. I use them all but I pay more attention to the TPMS. At some point you have to put a stack in the ground and say, that's the gauge I'll use. Then read your tires and handling. Sluggish handling, add air. Too snappy, let some air out. Wearing too much in the middle, let some air out. Wearing too much on the edges, add some air. Who really cares what the gauge says? It's a starting point. Once you get the ride and wear you want, use whatever pressure it reads from then on. I only look at the TPMS once when it's cold. If it's down, I add some when I get home for the next ride. Dare I say, use common sense. Better not.:sad:
 

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On The Road Again!
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I'll pass on the digital gauges. Who knows how accurate it is when the battery gets weak?
And of course, when you need it most, the battery is dead.
I have an old, round, analog gauge that I've been using for many years. That's good enough for me.
 

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2021 CanAm Spyder RT
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I bought a portable air compressor that I run off a portable emergency 12 volt battery, and it has a built in digital gauge. I was using that for my cars and my motorcycle and thought that my Goldwing tires must be losing air because fairly often the low air pressure warning came on. After comparing that built in digital gauge to older stick gauges, I came to the conclusion that the digital gauge was reading about 4 psi OVER the real pressure, so that a small loss of pressure was enough to trigger the warning light on the motorcycle. I have gone back to using inexpensive stick air pressure gauges and it seems to be working out just fine. For what its worth, I like to keep my tires a few pounds higher than what is recommended. I would rather have a bit rougher ride rather than and even slightly sluggish feel.
 

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Yeah, that rougher ride translates to a better responding bike in curves and offensive maneuvers.:thumbsup: At least for me it does.
 

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Small gauge with a round dial and needle. Some need a button to be pressed, to return needle to zero. Also it has to fit between two discs on the front. Not easy with some gauges.

Years ago at the track, one good reliable gauge. It may not have been perfectly accurate against a set standard, but needed to be accurate for reading 1 pound changes in pressure. I later used it for the dirt bikes, where it was not so critical. And later still on my tractor, when I got the rear wheel solution in it, and that was the end of my best gauge.

UK
 

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I use a stick, for both bikes, however I've gone double darkside on the Yamaha. So just enough pressure to keep it from wallowing around like a pig but not so much it feels like a jackhammer.
:)
 

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Yeah, that rougher ride translates to a better responding bike in curves and offensive maneuvers.:thumbsup: At least for me it does.
Absolutely right, Hog.
Honda's manual says something like 32 pounds for my Goldwing.
Damned thing handles like a truck at that pressure. Awful!
All the Goldwing forums tell you to run 41 pounds. They are right.
The bike handles GREAT like that!
I can tell immediately if the tire pressure drops even by two pounds
or so, as the bike becomes harder to handle and less pleasant to ride.
 

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I have a dial 'Bourdon' type:
https://www.faithfulltools.com/p/FAIAUPGAUGE/Tyre-Pressure-Dial-Gauge-60PSI

A cheap digital:
https://amtechdiy.com/product/digital-tyre-pressure-gauge/

And a pen type:
https://www.drapertools.com/product/51541/Tyre-Pressure-Gauge

The pen-style gauge is made in England, all metal construction
and is of excellent quality.

The dial and digital units are in exact agreement and the pen
type typically reads +1psi relative to the other two. The three
gauges have been very consistent with no measurable drift
in accuracy over a period of several years.

I did try a very low cost plastic pen type gauge. This was hopelessly
inaccurate. Typical error was around +6psi in the 30-40psi range.
 

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I look for consistency rather than trying to chase down accuracy. If I get the pressure where I like it, I know where it needs to be on a specific gauge. I find the cheap stick gauges are surprisingly consistent and close enough for me at this point, i.e. I've a couple that read almost exactly the same each time...
 
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My biggest problem with any guage, is not so much the accuracy of the guage, but making myself use it!

If I bend my knees too far for too long, they don't want to straighten back out. Don't know whether to blame it on arthritis or lard.
 

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Snap-On dial type from the early 1980's.

Made in the USA, heavy brass, rubber armored, one nice gauge.

About 15 years ago, it was a "new in package" auction and I won for about $5..I could just hear the guy cussing when he shipped that...nothing of Snapon costs $5, then or now.

Last year, before they closed our local store, Sears sent me a $10 off any $10 purchase, so I picked up a craftsman dial gauge...it was under by 6lbs!...I did an exchange and it was over by 3lbs..another exchange and under by 3lbs...I gave up...tossed it....Made in China junk...store closed about 6 months later.

My snapon reads just shy of a pound heavy. I'm confident of that because I tested against a gauge racing teams use: Longacre Analog Air Pressure Gauges
 

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If I bend my knees too far for too long, they don't want to straighten back out. Don't know whether to blame it on arthritis or lard.
As long as it is one or the other, I think you'll be okay. The real problems start when even your lard has arthritis! :smile_big:
 

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My bike has alloy wheels and I just figured out this weekend that I can't find a gauge that I can get into the space to check it. Hmmmm.
 

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My bike has alloy wheels and I just figured out this weekend that I can't find a gauge that I can get into the space to check it. Hmmmm.
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I use a gauge with a hose that has a right angle chuck. They are on various web sites. Google.

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