Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
804 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After the dealer violated my wallet in unspeakable ways at the last tire change, I've decided it's time to start doing it myself.

I'm planning to get tire irons, rim protectors, an air compressor and a tire balancer stand similar this. Anything else I'm missing?

It seems like it should be a fairly easy process. I've changed numerous bicycle tires, so I understand the basics.

Any tips or common mistakes to avoid?
 

·
Troublemaker
Joined
·
2,517 Posts
I use a 10' 4X4 and a 2X4 to break the beads on the bed of my trailer.

I bought 4 of these.

And 4 of these

And use Counteract balancing beads rather than ugly lead weights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
804 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the tips, Luvs2Play. Never heard of the balancing beads, gonna give that a try. And I agree, those weights are butt-ugly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Lube for the rim, makes it easier to get the new tire on. Don't use soap and water; that'll become slippery again when it gets wet. You want something that stays dry once it dries.
 

·
Save them all!
Joined
·
4,278 Posts
Lube. Lots of lube.

Edit: Darn, he beat me to it.
 

·
Troublemaker
Joined
·
2,517 Posts
I've always used soap and water except for one time, I used Armor all, worked really good, but the tire moved on the rim with heavy braking.
 

·
Gone
Joined
·
23,907 Posts
I use a soapy water solution when changing tires. I wouldn't recommend Armor All. You want to keep that stuff off of motorcycle tires.
 

·
ZAMM Fanatic
Joined
·
2,730 Posts
The KEY thing you need for changing tires is great peace of mind. :)

Understand what makes changing a tire POSSIBLE and the rest is just mechanics and leverage.

Imagine a slice of your rim, ANY tubeless rim, and it looks like a "C"

Or even a <C.

Picture the spokes down in the little channel indicated by "<"

That channel is where BOTH BEADS of 90% of the tire must "rest" while you're prying the last 10% over the rim of the wheel.

There's simply no other way. The tire doesn't have sufficient diameter to press ONTO the rim UNLESS both beads, front and rear, are "stuffed" down into that little channel while you lever the rest on.

An extra pair (or two) of hands can help enormously

You can make changing a tire look easy if you can keep MOST of the bead from getting out of that channel while "spooning" the remainder over the rim. Let it slip and so much force is required either your tire spoon (lever) will slip, or if you were able to apply it, tear the bead. (Unlikely, it's steel cable inside).

Might not need to be said, but always REMOVE one bead (over the rim) at a time after breaking them loose. You ain't got enough juice to remove both.

I have on more than one occasion used a dremel to cut the beads on an old tire to remove it. As long as you don't nick the rim, why the heck not make it easy on yourself.

I just paid to have a tire broken down because a valve stem dry rotted to where, when I barely touched it to put an air chuck on it, air leaked. That's good reason to:

A) Check your tire inflation regularly and inspect for tire damage, sidewall bubbles, nails, leaking valve stems / schrader valves (apply saliva to make sure it doesn't bubble) and especially repeat low pressure in one tire --- often a slow leak. (Inflate your tire to 60-100 psi to find the tiniest of leaks)

B) Buy a couple of replacements and Replace your valve stems while you're at it.

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
804 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the tips, guys.

Been checking on the costs, it's definitely worth it. Two or three changes will basically pay for all the equipment. Plus, I have a reason to get new toys!
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top