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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #1
I figure that it's "time to think about" how you are going to set up your bike for "Winter" for those of us who live in areas where "Winter" is cold, snowy, icy........We still have a good amount of "riding" to do yet this year, unless things get uncharacteristically ugly, early. But let's at least begin the discussion, so we are not caught off guard...........

(Certainly there are a lot of variables, but given the large number of "new" riders out there, who just bought their first bikes this year, perhaps this is a good time to start the conversation for their sakes.)

There are some basics to cover, for their sakes:

1) Where are you going to store it?
2) How are you (minimally) going to protect it?

AS for Number 1, I'd offer:

-If you don't have a garage, consider finding someone who is willing to put
your bike up for you. You might want to offer them a cash incentive to do
so.

- You might consider a storage unit somewhere.


-I have heard of some folks who bring their bikes into their homes
but that isn't common I don't believe. Especially if there is a wife who
isn't in favor of such a move.

-As much as is reasonably possible, store you bike in an area that has little
or no dampness or temperature variation if possible.

-Critters (mice, particularly) may try and find a place to "nest" within the
engine compartment and other locations of your bike. (Keep a watchful
eye on this. You might consider setting traps under your bike, to
avoid this).

With regard to Number 2:

If last Winter is any indicator, there won't be much Winter riding around
these parts, except for those who are "year round no matter the weather"
types (and they DO exist). Let's assume, for the sake of discussion, that
you "won't" be riding for that span of time.

Here are some basics:

-Stabil (or comparable product for protecting the gas in your tank).
Store with a full tank of gas.

-Change your oil and oil filter just before storage

-Make sure (if you have one) that your Coolant system is full with
50/50 mix.

-Turn your Fuel Valve to "off"

-Drain the Carburetor(s)

-Remove the Spark Plugs and Store (do not leave on the Spark Plug wires)
Pour a tablespoon of CLEAN engine oil into each Cylinder and cover with
a cloth. (Crank the engine several times to distribute the oil).
Reinstall the Spark Plugs and Wires.

-Remove and charge the Battery and store in a warm place to avoid freeze.
(If you use a trickle charger like I do, such as the Battery Tender Jr., you
can just leave it charging without removal).

-Wash and dry the motorcycle. Wax all painted surfaces, and coat all
chrome parts with a light oil film.

-Lubricate the Drive Chain

-Make sure your tires are at the proper inflation level and elevate the
bike in some way, to ensure that the tires are not in contact with the ground
to avoid flat spots in the tires.

-Cover the motorcycle (an old bed sheet works great).

There are other tricks of the trade, I'm sure........and others in here will add their thoughts to the above suggestions as well.

We who have been riding a while, would like to see you "sucessfully" back on your bike NEXT year, and if you follow the suggestions in here, you will stand a better chance of doing so with little or no issues.

-Soupy
 

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I don't wanna put my bike away!!! But I fear a bad winter this year, and another early one. The only suggestion that I haven't heard of is removing the spark plug...good to know. I've heard to never leave the tires on cement for extended periods of time, to always leave atleast a heavy piece of cardboard between cement and tire. Will be buying battery tenders before parking.
 

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I'll fill my tank up, add some sta-bil ride a bit to get it mixed well and into the injectors and then park it in my shed....this will be the second year in there....I have power run to it and the battery maintainer will be hooked to it....although if we get a nice day, I will take it out for a ride....so far in the 6 years I've had a bike I have been able to ride at least a few days each "winter" month
 

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Pegasus trapped in a human body on a motorcycle
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Winter comes around, and I take the bike to Starting Line after topping off the tank with an oz. or so of Startron. They take care of the bike, and the additive takes care of the fuel in the bike.

Wish I had my own garage, but at least I know the bike is safe.
 

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My storage plans for the winter:
I'm going to store some breakfast in my belly.
I'm going to put my butt on the seat.
I will crank the engine.
I will warm it up.
I will put it in gear.
I will ride down the road.
Rinse and repeat!

Living in AZ pretty much rocks!! :71baldboy:
 

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When it comes to mice getting into odd places, they seem to like to go into exhaust pipes. Stuff a bit of steel wool into the exhaust but don't forget you did that next spring.
 

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Female Rider
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I put old socks over the end of the tailpipes as opposed to stuffing something in them. That way I will hopefully see it and remove it.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Probably should do both MONI. Those little critters can gnaw that sock and get inside in less than 30 minutes. Too late once inside. The sock should just be the reminder you stuffed to pipes.:thumbsup:
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #10
When it comes to mice getting into odd places, they seem to like to go into exhaust pipes. Stuff a bit of steel wool into the exhaust but don't forget you did that next spring.

Interesting idea........I'll try and remember that.

-Soupy
 

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Female Rider
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So do Downy dryer sheets. When we bought our motorhome they told us to load it down with downy sheets each winter. It works if it's only parked a month or so. I've learned I need to put more in there every month or two thru the winter.

Yep, Hog I probably should stuff something in them too. It was a sight to see last year when Randy started the Vision and the nest and whole family hit the garage door. The cats were right there for their lunch. As you say, one had chewed a hole thru the sock. We said then that we were going to put a dryer sheet at the end of each sock this year.
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
......................... It was a sight to see last year when Randy started the Vision and the nest and whole family hit the garage door...............
I SHOULD feel sorry for the mice, being God's creatures and all that...........but........I laughed when I read that!

Here's a helpful video that someone will find helpful:


-Soupy
 

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Ha that reminds me of an easter egg hunt. We hid an egg in the muffler. Unfortunately it got stuck. I told the kids to stand back and id fire the car up and poop the egg out. Well my son must not have been far enough back as he got the egg in the family jewels. So if I never become a gramma I have no one but myself to blame.
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #16
Someone else this morning, noted that they bring in their leather seats and saddle bags and store them in the warm house, during storage in Winter. Preventing any cracking or damage to the leather. Interesting point!

Also, the Battery does NOT (in some opinion circles) "need" to be brought out to the bike and into the house, if you have a Battery Tender on it 24/7. What'dya think about that? I tend to accept the idea.
 

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Thank God, I keep my bike in my buddy's garage.
He's about 1/2 mile from my condo, so it's verry convenient.

In Northern Virginia, we have only about four to six bad weeks each winter -- and they are normally not consecutive.
So the bikes never get put away at any time.
 

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I parked mine in an unheated shed last winter with my battery tender on and fuel stabilizer in and it was fine....though I did get the bike out a few times (had a fairly mild winter last time)

I think that if your parking area is unheated and you don't plan on the bike moving for 3 months at all, then take the battery inside and on a tender, if it's heated or going to be used you should be fine leaving it in the bike.....that's my take on it anyway
 

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A tender really should be able to take care of any battery. With that said, I am the first to admit that I do nothing at all for battery winter storage. My bike runs at least every other week all year long and that means I never need to worry about "storage issues". Simply stated, my bike is never stored in any traditional sense. Not even when I see snow on the road. A warmer day will be along soon and I will spend that day riding.
 
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