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Ninjette Rider
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71 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Alright, I haven't been on here awhile. I got my 05 ninja EX250 about 3 months ago and have put about 1000 miles on it already. I want to sell it this winter and buy a gixxer 600 6k or newer. I have dumped the bike one time coming around a corner because a deer jumped in front of me in the middle of the turn and I straightened out and lowsided in the grass. I actually learned a lot from that about going deeper into corners etc. ifeel 95% comfortable with riding. My 5% is when I'm in a corner, I am always afraid to try and go deeper in the fear of lowsiding. I have stock tires and I can't seem to put my trust in them that they will stick. I've been told that my cornering position is near perfect. Knee out, ass half off the seat, helmet past the mirror. Had anyone else had the same fear and joe did you overcome it. Any input would be great.
 

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1999 CBR 600 F4
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345 Posts
0.o Only 1000 miles in 3 months? I've done 500 in 2 weeks, not even daily commuting, maybe I'm just a joy rider. Hm.

If you feel comfortable I'd say go for it, but you'll be riding a whole new bike, so pretend it's like your first time riding again and slowly build up your skills, don't try and do what you do on your 250 now (Because your specifying your position to be so aggressive, I can only assume your going over the speed limit) so just watch out for what you do on the 600. You'll go a whole lot faster than you think your going, and your going to get up to any speed a whole lot faster too. So again, just watch your speed, keep your throttle under control.
 

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Ninjette Rider
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71 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Well, as of now my dad won't let me ride alone or I would be riding every day. The biggest reason of my positioning is I am afraid of leaning too much and the tires lose traction. That's pretty much my biggest fear. Other then hitting gravel In a turn, catching traction, and highsiding into an oncoming vehicle. Lol
 

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There is a big difference from 250 to a 600. Riding is riding, keeping it under control is the difference. The 600 will be much more responsive than the Ninja 250. I found that the Ninja 250 and 500 are very forgiving. I went from a Ninja 250 to a Ninja 500 (not much difference in power). I bought my 600 last year, BIG difference! Throttle is way more responsive, agility is much better, power is a whole different animal, riding position is different. I wouldn't give up my 600RR for anything, I love it. Just take is slow until you get the feel of it and respect the power. 1000 miles may feel like a lot of seat time but it isn't ;) so be safe and enjoy the new ride :)
 

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You are having trouble with cornering on the street with a 250 and want to move up to a super-sport? I'll give you a hint, the cornering will not be easier on a bigger bike. I'd recommend comfortably mastering the smaller, easier-to-handle bike before going larger. More practice (and miles) will ease the fear of cornering. Start with mastering the basics before hitting corners at warp speed.
 

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If you have any fears cornering on your 250 at all, then you are NOT ready for a supersport. Far less forgiving.
 

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Ninjette Rider
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71 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for all your input. There's a church parking lot by my house that i've decided to practice every day in. any tips on cornering in general? Will the tires hold? I know in my head that they will but I guess it would help to hear close to the brink so I can have an idea.
 

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The tires will hold under the proper conditions. Most bikes will scrape hard parts before the tires lose traction. I would not recommend pushing a bike to the limit unless it is absolutely certain the road conditions are tip-top. A bit of gravel, sand, wet leaves or spilled fuel can ruin your day. That kind of riding is best left to the track where there are more controls in place.

To be safe, it's always best to take corners at a reasonable speed to leave plenty of extra lean angle in reserve when riding the roads. You never know when you just might need it.
 

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Ninjette Rider
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71 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I am bringing a push broom and some cones to make a "track" to start practicing at the church by my house. I want to be able to take any turn with full confidence before I get a bigger bike
 

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Smart move. No sense quadrupling your power and adding 100+lbs of weight if you still have some trouble with cornering. Just remember that almost anyone can crank the throttle and power through the gears in a straight line but it truly takes skill to be able to really corner well.
 

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I'm honestly just curious where on a public street you could ride a 250 hard enough to need to slide off the seat, knee out.

We play a lot of supermoto type riding on back roads with the dual sports and I do a fair amount of what would be high speed riding for a 250 when on my 550 and I've very seldom come across a situation where I need to hang off, maybe a knee out just for a minimal weight shift, but no sliding off the seat - just not needed, at speeds your 250 won't do in said corner.

I find it very hard to believe your technique on a 250 is remotely needed on a 250, unless you're on some go-kart track. The bike just doesn't dictate the need for it. So I have to question your skill at this point.

Go ride the thing without hanging off like you're at Laguna Seca. You may learn to have some faith in the tires.

I chased down some kid on a CBR 600 RR doing the same knee out half off the seat routine, riding my dinky 43 hp 550. I never moved off the saddle, nor did I even have to hang a knee out to keep up with this kid in the corners. He had form, but no idea when to use it. I saw the same thing where a woman was riding a BMW 800 on a winding road. I was stuck behind her and her husband/boyfriend. She was sliding off the seat to the inside of the turns at a speed my old mini van could do.

You've spent a thousand miles doing the wrong thing. Now go learn to STREET RIDE, not track ride. That bike will lean in so far it would make your head swim - without any hanging off. All that hanging off in your early learning is take attention away from actually cornering. Mike Hailwood did a lot of winning and riding faster than you or most of the rest of us without ever hanging off. You don't need to hang off until you go fast enough to need to gain the extra clearance or to avoid riding off the side of the tire. With a thousand miles on a 250 you are no where close.

Sorry to be brutally blunt, but unless you are the next coming of Valentino Rossi (and being fearful of leaning due to trust in the tires, you are not) you are on the wrong learning track. You are no where near ready for a 100+ hp bike. Cut the gymnastics on the seat and go with the flow of the bike in cornering, the rest will come later... much later.

As for trusting tires, the only way to do so is to simply lean in more when your head says not. Do it when you are play riding. On a clean known road, ride into a corner on the outside riding as if you were going to stay there, then intentionally move in tighter. I actually will goof around mid corner moving in deeper or out wider.

It enables me to have the confidence to do so. When I'm in a corner and I see something I need to avoid I can simply turn in deeper. And all this on dual sport 60/40 tires to boot. There are a few corners where I can drag a toe on a dual sport with 10" clearance. Practice and confidence.

Two friends who've done the Keith Code Superbike school said the biggest thing they learned was to be able to turn in deeper - the tires work better than the rider. Knowing riders, Code told them when going into a corner and thinking you may be in too fast, turn in deeper - lean it. The tires are better than the rider. I've heard of more riders running off the road than lowsiding due to the tire not sticking. Anyone who's lowsided did so due to road conditions, like sand or oil or pea gravel, not because the tire would't stick to good pavement.

When you learn and can do that, then go buy a GSXR.
 

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Ninjette Rider
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71 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Alright I'm going out on my first ride alone today. So one more question. How long does it take for the tires to warm up
 

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Ninjette Rider
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71 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Alright, I've been riding A LOT MORE. I feel much much more comfortable. And I've changed my choices for bikes. F4i w/ split seat or a zzr600. Now I think the only two "supersport" bikes I would go for are a cbr600rr or a 675 at awesome prices. Other than that nah
 
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