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American Legion Rider & sub-Administrator
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Was just thinking, what happened to our resident chinese scooter expert?
@Miss Mercedes , if your around we could use some wisdom here.
I think her new job has her interested in other things these days.
 
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American Legion Rider & sub-Administrator
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Interesting. I know another "Miss Mercedes" who belongs to a Smart Car forum because I recently bought a Smart Car. I wonder if it's the same lady.
One in the same. She is probably flying by now too.
 
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When was the belt last changed?
The more the sides of the belt wear down the later the engagement will be. Just like a snowmobile.
You can get lumps in the belts too which cause vibrations, have the belt flip over, delaminate or completely shred.

Wait, you said it is brand new :unsure: you should have all that to look forward to.

Back to the drive clutch weights, you need slightly heavier ones. Typically on a clutch like that you need to give it lots of throttle to get going and then once it engages you can back it off quick to almost idle.
 

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2006 Honda CBR1000RR, 2008 Honda CRF230L, 2019 Honda CRF1000L
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When was the belt last changed?
The more the sides of the belt wear down the later the engagement will be. Just like a snowmobile.
You can get lumps in the belts too which cause vibrations, have the belt flip over, delaminate or completely shred.

Wait, you said it is brand new :unsure: you should have all that to look forward to.

Brand new
 

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If it's brand new are they all that way? Otherwise it's a dealer issue unless they don't want to fix it.
 

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:LOL: If they can't fix it, then I told you exactly how you can modify it to make it engage earlier, make the weights heavier in the centrifugal drive clutch. If you make them too heavy it won't release when you need it to. That could be bad.

... or you could just raise the idle speed, same result.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
:LOL: If they can't fix it, then I told you exactly how you can modify it to make it engage earlier, make the weights heavier in the centrifugal drive clutch. If you make them too heavy it won't release when you need it to. That could be bad.

... or you could just raise the idle speed, same result.
I've improved the situation some. I bought a new spark plug because I don't trust the Chinese brand. I had not taken the plug out before today because I lost my spark gap tool so I bought a new spark gap tool too. The plug from the factory was gapped at 0.225 which would be 5mm. My gap according to the manual should be 6mm (0.236 ) or 7mm (0.275) That's a pretty large variation. The 0.255 seemed really narrow. I set the gap to right at 0.270 and reset the idle so that a small pull on the throttle would cause the back wheel to spin but not to spin just at idle. From my ears is sounds like it's idling way too fast compared to videos I've compared it to but it gives me more of the desired effect I was looking for. - There is a P in my model number, it's a 1P57QMJ. The P I understand gives my stock engine a performance boost over non P models. This is what the NCY Store has to say about it:

"NOTE: If you have a letter “P” after example “1P”, stands for (P)air valve horizontal engine. The P series engine has a taller cylinder head and a shallow recess cam seating that gives it slightly more performance than non-P GY6’s engine code. However, if both cylinder and cylinder head is swap out it will be identical to the non-P GY6 139QMB engine. So, parts are interchangeable as long as both are replaced cylinder and cylinder head from 1P and non-P. But why? Because their so many upgrades available for non-P type engines include performance camshaft, etc. "

I wonder if this is partly the reason why my engine seems to rev higher when set as the manual recommends?
 

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Idle speed is usually determined by the design of the motorcycle, for example a Montesa has a very high idle at 1800rpm It needs that because it uses electric powered fuel injection and has no battery, if you don't have a battery and your alternator needs to always be producing enough electricity to run you need high idle, because alternators don't make much power below 1800rpm.

What are your options for clutch parts?

... and you have all your decimal places in the wrong spot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Idle speed is usually determined by the design of the motorcycle, for example a Montesa has a very high idle at 1800rpm It needs that because it uses electric powered fuel injection and has no battery, if you don't have a battery and your alternator needs to always be producing enough electricity to run you need high idle, because alternators don't make much power below 1800rpm.

What are your options for clutch parts?

... and you have all your decimal places in the wrong spot.
My option for clutch parts is Amazon. I know the lights can work off the battery, I also know they brighten with engine acceleration if that tells you anything. My manual doesn't mention idle speed RPM's at all.

I was using this for the decimal places mm to inches | millimeters to inches converter I looked them up because my manual only mentions 6 and 7 mm and my gap tool doesn't read MM's. I wasn't worried about it.. I figured you guys would get the gist.
 

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The wife has a Burgman 200 scooter. To start from a stop, it takes about 4500 rpms (1/2 throttle).
After started moving, it goes well. CVTs are just that way. But a nice scooter to ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 · (Edited)
The wife has a Burgman 200 scooter. To start from a stop, it takes about 4500 rpms (1/2 throttle).
After started moving, it goes well. CVTs are just that way. But a nice scooter to ride.
Thanks, That tells me my expectations are part of the problem. My experience with a two wheel bike with a motor until I got the scooter is an electric bike I built in 2010. It uses 48 volts, has a 1000 watt hub motor and does top speed at 38 mph. It has no delay at all yet accelerates slowly and smoothly consistently. I got so used to that over the last 11 years the gas engine is really a strange duck to me.

In fact the E- bike is the reason why I now own a 150cc scooter. I got tired of replacing the 4 12v sla's every year and thought I'd buy a 48v 20ah LiPo4. They are $700.00 dollars from China which is ify in quality or $1000.00 dollars from the US. I figured if I was going to spend that anyway, why not upgrade to something with more power and range that I wouldn't have to spend 8 hours charging every night.
 

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In principal the clutches on scooters work nearly the same as a chainsaw, most of the time you are working it the throttle will be full on or full off. A spring retracts spinning weights and centrifugal force makes the weights move outward. If you make the spinning weights heavier, or the return spring weaker, the drive is going to engage sooner and let go later. If you make the spring stronger or the spinning weights lighter, you are going to need to rev it up real good to make things happen.


 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
In principal the clutches on scooters work nearly the same as a chainsaw, most of the time you are working it the throttle will be full on or full off. A spring retracts spinning weights and centrifugal force makes the weights move outward. If you make the spinning weights heavier, or the return spring weaker, the drive is going to engage sooner and let go later. If you make the spring stronger or the spinning weights lighter, you are going to need to rev it up real good to make things happen.
Thanks but I really don't think the roller weights they gave me or the spring are the problem. I discovered something else last night in that the throttle play setting may have been too tight. They suggest 2 to 6 mm of play. 6 mm of play is a LOT of play. I choose to go 2mm or less simply because I didn't want it to interfere with my expatiations of how much the throttle should be moved before the wheel turns. They tell you first adjust the cable at the nut and threaded adjustment under the throttle and if this is not enough to remove desired play to then adjust it further at the other end of the cable at the carburetor. On trying to get all the play out with the nut and threated adjustment I noticed the nut would come off before all the play was out. I reasoned I needed further adjustments at the carb end which I then made after placing the nut back on. After some research last night I discovered this may have had the effect of causing the butterfly to open too much too fast helping to cause the faster idle. It was only after I reset the throttle at the carb end to where it was to begin with that I was able to readjust the idle so it was not so fast. I do now have more play than desired in the throttle but this may be something I'm just going to have to get used to, as it seems my expectations of how it should work were wrong.
 

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Sure does should like all the things that should have been adjusted before you received the new bike. Also sounds like you have a handle on it (y) you might even want to go over the whole bike, it would not be the first motorcycle delivered with no grease in the steering head bearings.
 

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Maybe I missed it. Wot size is the engine? If it is less than about 250cc then the thing has to scream to move. Most of them have to scream to do anything. UK
 
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