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Hey, every/anyone! I've loved motorcycles from afar, and now I'm looking into buying a 1984 Honda Magna v65 or V45. I've been driving a 250cc scooter for years, but want something bigger that I can use for commuting and trips, as short or long as I want them. I know that might be a BIG jump, but I remember sitting on a Magna about 4 years ago, and it literally just felt right. Now, I've researched up and down all about the 80s Magnas, and now about every thing about them, just about. The one question I need help with is... Would it be smart to buy one that old now, knowing that that model is that old??? Wanting this to be my long-term bike, so would finding parts become a problem if anything were to happen to it??? Would this make Honda dealerships or bike shops knowledge of this bike dissipate because they haven't seen a lot like it??? I know that with older bikes, someone could be much more capable of lower cost maintenance because it's less fancy stuff, and more just motor and metal, and I'm more than willing to do things myself, but I do have a motorcycle shop in town, if anything were to go wrong. They are both VERY clean bikes, but I just would like some insight on if, since it's not really around anymore, would this be a smart/good purchase.

Thanks, all!
 

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Hey, every/anyone! I've loved motorcycles from afar, and now I'm looking into buying a 1984 Honda Magna v65 or V45. I've been driving a 250cc scooter for years, but want something bigger that I can use for commuting and trips, as short or long as I want them. I know that might be a BIG jump, but I remember sitting on a Magna about 4 years ago, and it literally just felt right. Now, I've researched up and down all about the 80s Magnas, and now about every thing about them, just about. The one question I need help with is... Would it be smart to buy one that old now, knowing that that model is that old??? Wanting this to be my long-term bike, so would finding parts become a problem if anything were to happen to it??? Would this make Honda dealerships or bike shops knowledge of this bike dissipate because they haven't seen a lot like it??? I know that with older bikes, someone could be much more capable of lower cost maintenance because it's less fancy stuff, and more just motor and metal, and I'm more than willing to do things myself, but I do have a motorcycle shop in town, if anything were to go wrong. They are both VERY clean bikes, but I just would like some insight on if, since it's not really around anymore, would this be a smart/good purchase.

Thanks, all!
First, welcome!

Second, any older bike is going to be hit or miss regarding shop maintenance and it might be a good idea to give them a call and ask if they'd be comfortable and/or knowledgeable in working on it. There is no doubt that learning the bike yourself will be a huge plus! As for the Magnas, they are considered solid bikes, especially if taken care of, BUT with 4 carbs, they can be quite tricky to tune.

Might be a good idea to watch some maintenance/tuning vids to get an idea of what you might be getting yourself into...

I've found this site - Honda Motorcycle OEM Parts, Ron Ayers - to be invaluable in getting parts and also understanding how my bike "fits" together.

Good luck and would love to see some pics of whatever you decide to buy!
 

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I have a 84 v65 magna and I love it. I have been working on and customizing old bikes for years and the old grandpaw power cruzers are starting to be forgotten. A V45 or a V65 are great bikes and will give you years of fun and enjoyment with care. But they have there things that will make you pull your hair out. If your a person that wants to go back and forth to work and go for a ride through the country side a V45 is perfect. A V65 will give you all that and can give you an easy 11sec 1/4 mile. If you can keep the front end down. When you get them tuned put no ethanol gas in it at the end of the riding season. And run carb cleaner twice during the season and I've seen v65s with 80,000 miles on them and still running strong.
 

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American Legion Rider Staff Administrator
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And the V65 was once thought of as a killer bike. But it's a pussycat by some of todays bikes. I have always liked the looks of those bikes.
(y) (y) (y)
 

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Zip
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Honda used the V65 in three different styles of bikes: the Magna cruiser, the Interceptor sport bike, and the Sabre "standard" bike. One day I was slogging along in heavy highway traffic on my Suzuki GS550 and nearby was a guy on a V65 Sabre. The Sabre guy saw a small opening in traffic and just blipped the throttle, without downshifting, and poof was gone. From that time the V65 Sabre was my dream bike (until I read reviews of its somewhat poor handling on curvy roads).
 

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Secret Agent
2006 Honda CBR1000RR, 2008 Honda CRF230L, 2019 Honda CRF1000L
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Up until I got my CBR 1000rr, my old 84 v65 magna had been my favorite bike. I gave it up when my two boys came along, otherwise I'd still have it.

Extremely comfortable bike to ride. Timing chains tends to stretch, and coolant leaks seemed common on those that didn't get the cooling system services somewhat regularly.

They've got loads of power, but it's extremely manageable power. It's not like my CBR 1k where it feels like the throttle is connected directly to the back tire. The v65 magna was my all time favorite style. Only thing close in recent years is the Honda Shadow 1100, as far as style goes, imo. Sadly, the shadow didn't do symmetrical exhaust like the v65.
 

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I have a little different outlook on the V45 in 65. I have built the carburetors on a few of them, and adjusted valves on a few of them, they are one of harder motorcycle's I have had to work on. I would charge around seven or eight hours of Labor to adjust the valves on one. And to clean the fuel system around 9 or 10 hour. And they are supposed to have the valves adjusted every 8,000 miles. And I found the valves on them all to be very tight, because nobody adjusted the valves. Every 8000 Miles like they were supposed to.
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  • A couple bikes I would recommend looking for would be a 650 or 750 early model Nighthawk. (With hydraulic valves) they were very good motorcycles and the maintenance was very very little. They have hydraulic valve, so you never have to adjust the valves. If you can find somebody to do the maintenance on it. and you can afford to have the valves adjusted, every 8,000 miles. The V45 and v65 are pretty good motorcycles, just a lot more maintenance.
Just my opinion y'all be safe???
 
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