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Discussion Starter #1
So I made another thread concerning an old Suzuki T500 I was thinking of buying, and was convinced to look elsewhere. But now I have found a 1974 Suzuki GT250 which I'm going to look at in 2 days. It is a beautiful bike and appears to be in great condition. It hasn't been started in 10 years, but the owner claims it's been stored indoors the entire time and will only need a tune up and a battery. Also he lost the key for it so I will need to have a new one made if I am to buy it.. Are these serious red flags?? The asking price is $1800 but I was thinking of offering him something lower. It's just such a beautiful looking bike.. Does this seem like a fair deal or am I about to get ripped off majorly? Also is it even smart to get a 2-stroke as a first bike?? It seems like with the narrower power band and everything it might be a bit hard to control, not to mention having to mix the gas which seems like a huge pain. Can anyone tell me if this is just a horrible idea? Or if maybe I'm not insane to think this could work out?? Also I don't have a whole lot of money, about 3 grand at the present moment.. So I'm worried about the overall cost of everything here too..
Sorry for the long self indulgent posts guys. Anything at all would be appreciated. Thanks a ton.

-Sol
 

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First off a bike parked and neglected for 10 years is going to need much more than a battery and tune. I also don't like getting something with out a key. I doubt seriously he lost it. At best he's trying to delay you finding out just what a mess it is. At worse it's not even his to begin with. I may have missed it but I didn't see anything about title mentioned. Anyway, if you want to wrench on something I'd offer maybe $400. Seems it's worth more to him than me huh.:D
 

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^^^what he said^^^^
 

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Gone
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A good question to ask is if there is a clear title in the current owner's name when buying any motorcycle.

For $1800, you can likely find a much newer motorcycle that actually runs.
 

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I went down the road you are questioning as last year I sold a newer Suzuki 2008 model for a 73' Suzuki GT380 2 stroke triple.
The Suzuki 2 strokes use a oil pump to inject oil into the crank bearings so you can't disconnect the system and only run premix .You also have rubber crank seals that can go bad and can leak transmission fluid into the combustion area I would make sure they are good if buying one because it takes spitting the case and taking the crank out to replace those
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While they are cool as all get out bikes when there are running right your still getting 40 year old machinery that will need constant attention.
In the year I owned the bike I spent more time wrenching in the garage and getting to chat with a few tow truck drivers as I had 2 breakdowns requiring being towed.
After my last breakdown I swore to sell it and got a 30 year newer bike and got back into riding which is more fun IMO.
 

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Noobymon,

It sounds like you are really fascinated with the old bikes, and l commend you for that. If l were you, this is what l would do...

1) Buy a good bike that is 10 years old or newer, in fine working order, and start riding. This way, you have a good bike to ride anytime you want that will not require wrenching other than the routine maintenance that we all have to do. Something simple, like a Suzuki GS500.

2) Start researching and find the community college in your area that offers motorcycle/marine mechanics and get started taking classes.

3) Buy yourself a CHEAP project bike, one that is complete and, preferably, hasn't already been taken apart by the previous owner, who could not figure out how to put it back together again. I see these on Craigslist all the time for less than $1000, and often times for just a few hundred.

Now you are riding, you have a project bike, and you have a great resource in your classes to lean on while you do your first restoration. A couple of years from now you will habve a restored bike and a whole bunch of knowledge to do whatever you want with whatever bike you want.
 

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If he told you it needs to have pre mixed fuel, he may have actually done that and ruined the engine. Which could be why he's not ridding it.
Plus it is over priced as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
First off a bike parked and neglected for 10 years is going to need much more than a battery and tune. I also don't like getting something with out a key. I doubt seriously he lost it. At best he's trying to delay you finding out just what a mess it is. At worse it's not even his to begin with. I may have missed it but I didn't see anything about title mentioned. Anyway, if you want to wrench on something I'd offer maybe $400. Seems it's worth more to him than me huh.
Those are some valid points. This jerks trying to take me for a fool! And he would have too.. Thanks for the insight. I'm not even gonna look at the thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I went down the road you are questioning as last year I sold a newer Suzuki 2008 model for a 73' Suzuki GT380 2 stroke triple.
The Suzuki 2 strokes use a oil pump to inject oil into the crank bearings so you can't disconnect the system and only run premix .You also have rubber crank seals that can go bad and can leak transmission fluid into the combustion area I would make sure they are good if buying one because it takes spitting the case and taking the crank out to replace those
.
While they are cool as all get out bikes when there are running right your still getting 40 year old machinery that will need constant attention.
In the year I owned the bike I spent more time wrenching in the garage and getting to chat with a few tow truck drivers as I had 2 breakdowns requiring being towed.
After my last breakdown I swore to sell it and got a 30 year newer bike and got back into riding which is more fun IMO.
Ah yeah that doesn't sound like what I want. First off I know nothing about repairing anything, and I would like something I could take across the province here n there with no worry of it crapping out. Which bike did you buy after you sold the Suzuki? I just wish they made newer bikes in the same style as those old ones.. It seems like anything made in the past 20 years is basically either ninjas or chopper types.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Noobymon,

It sounds like you are really fascinated with the old bikes, and l commend you for that. If l were you, this is what l would do...

1) Buy a good bike that is 10 years old or newer, in fine working order, and start riding. This way, you have a good bike to ride anytime you want that will not require wrenching other than the routine maintenance that we all have to do. Something simple, like a Suzuki GS500.

2) Start researching and find the community college in your area that offers motorcycle/marine mechanics and get started taking classes.

3) Buy yourself a CHEAP project bike, one that is complete and, preferably, hasn't already been taken apart by the previous owner, who could not figure out how to put it back together again. I see these on Craigslist all the time for less than $1000, and often times for just a few hundred.

Now you are riding, you have a project bike, and you have a great resource in your classes to lean on while you do your first restoration. A couple of years from now you will habve a restored bike and a whole bunch of knowledge to do whatever you want with whatever bike you want.
Thanks that is a mighty fine idea. I don't really have much spare time for a mechanics course though, unless maybe I could take a weekend course or somethin. Do you know of any newish bikes which I might like given my fascination with the older motorcycle styles? Maybe an enduro would be the way to go?
 

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I just wish they made newer bikes in the same style as those old ones..
Currently there is the Yamaha SR400 and the Suzuki TU250X that are 2015 models and are old school 70's style.I'm with you on the styling of the old bikes as they are great looking seems like some of the manufacturers have caught on and are now making new classics.
My current bike is a 02' Suzuki Bandit 600S its a sport/touring type bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I just wish they made newer bikes in the same style as those old ones..
Currently there is the Yamaha SR400 and the Suzuki TU250X that are 2015 models and are old school 70's style.I'm with you on the styling of the old bikes as they are great looking seems like some of the manufacturers have caught on and are now making new classics.
My current bike is a 02' Suzuki Bandit 600S its a sport/touring type bike.
Oh man! Thanks so much for showing me these. That yamaha is so cool, it's a shame you can't buy one in Canada..
 

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I'd take the TUX over the SR. While the SR has more power, it's heavier and significantly more expensive too. It's also kick start only, which might be a nice novelty, but would wear off quickly, at least for me.

The TUX doesn't sell particularly well, so if you can find a new old stock model, you should be able to do better. The TUX is a very good starter bike.
 

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Get a newer bike. I've found vintage bikes are more for people that don't like to keep money in their pocket, have too much time on their hands, and like to problem solve.
 
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