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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #1
Can someone please explain the following?
High Side
Low Side
Drop
Laid down

I've been reading through the forums, and I'm not 100% clear on what these mean. (There will probably be more terms added as I go)
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #3
I did, Urban, and passed, earning my NY endorsement. And at no point did they explain those phrases.
 

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High side is crashing with the rider on the pavement in front of the motorcycle, sometimes going over the bars. Low side is crashing with the rider on the pavement behind the motorcycle.

A drop or tip over can occur at any speed but usually while traveling slowly.
 

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High side is when you lose traction on the rear wheel. Lowside usually means having too much lean going into the corner and not enough traction on the tire left due to trying to brake in a corner. Most happen on the front wheel.

Drop just means what it says, dropping the bike.

Laid down. Generally referred to as a motorcycle who may hit a car that turned out in front of him, and rather than try to brake out of it or other manuvears, decides just to lay the bike down on the ground and pray for the best. Some do this because they may think they avoid hitting the car, but usually end up with road rash if they are lucky. IMO, laying it down would be the last ditch effort, as I'd rather try my luck to avoid the accident by braking or swerving. But that's a hot topic here, everyone has their own way of doing things.

Edited to add: you'd be better off listening to Dod, he's probably got more accurate info, he responded before I did, but that's the explaination I was given by my instructor, I could be wrong...
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #6
Got it. I thought high and low referred to the sides of a bike in a turning lean, thus my confusion. Thanks for setting me straight.
 

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Those are defined in the e-course on their website.

High Side is when you fall over the high side of the bike. Example (recent from motoGP):
Meaning going over the bike instead of under it.

Low side is when you fall under the low side of the bike. "Loss of traction in a turn." Example:

Drop is forgetting to put your feet down :) 0-5 mph speeds. Example:

Laid down is dropped and damaged at speed. See examples 1 & 2.

People will typically call their bikes when they were laid down dropped bikes... but signs are obvious when you look how the fairing lines up with the rest of the body.
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Urban.
I took the two day BRC. Somehow, it didn't seem like something I could learn through an e-course.
It was great instruction, but not a lot of time was spent on the terminology of wipeouts.
(They focused more on avoiding them.)
 

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It should be covered in the book, which talks about these things that are not included in the course speech part,
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #10
I'll go back through the book and let you know.
An instructor told me they updated the coursebook recently. Maybe they changed it?
Either way, I'll check.
 

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The previous workbook had a glossary with definitions in it. I haven't checked if the latest version defines those or not.
 

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Low side and high side have never made sense to me either and I've been riding for awhile. Do you mount from the high side or the low side? See what I mean.
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #13
The previous workbook had a glossary with definitions in it. I haven't checked if the latest version defines those or not.
Just checked. The glossary does define High Side, but not the rest.
I'm rereading the book. Not a bad idea either way.
 

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The high side is probably the worse case scenario. It can happen from a variety of reasons, but often from locking then releasing the rear brake while the rear wheel is not in line with the front.
 

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Just need to remember these two things. Front brake locks up, release immediately then reapply. Rear brake locks up, keep her locked, don't let off brake until you have regained control, when rear wheel lines up with the front.
 

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Just think of a bike leaned over going around a corner, there's a low side on the inside of the bike and a high side on the outside of the bike.

Any fall where the bike slides away and it falls down onto your inside leg is a low sider.

Any fall where the bike comes upright and you're thrown over the bars or off to the center of the road is a high sider.

You will drop your bike, probably from forgetting to put your side stand down - don't worry, we've all done it. Don't fight the bike trying to hold it up, you can damage a muscle or joint. Try to ease 's fall and then pick it up again.

I bought a spare clutch lever and kept it in the garage, you nearly always drop your bike to the left and it's nearly always the clutch lever which breaks. But if you have a spare clutch lever, then you'll never break one - maybe break something else but never a clutch lever.
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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Discussion Starter #17
I bought a spare clutch lever and kept it in the garage, you nearly always drop your bike to the left and it's nearly always the clutch lever which breaks. But if you have a spare clutch lever, then you'll never break one - maybe break something else but never a clutch lever.
Ha! I should just buy two identical bikes. Nothing will ever go wrong!!! ;)
 

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If you're leaned over in a curve, and lock up the rear wheel, it will start to slide out from under you. If it continues until you hit the ground, you've just done a low side, or "laid it down" as old timers sometimes say. All bikes want to stand upright when rolling, so If you release the rear brake during a rear wheel slide like that, the bike is going to stand back up, and since it's at an angle to the direction of travel, momentum will probably carry it all the way to the outside of the curve. It could toss you off--- that's a high side.

It IS possible to save it from a high side, but 9 out of 10 riders can't. Most of the ones that can learned to ride in the dirt. Look at pictures of dirt riders doing "cross-ups" in power turns or off center jumps. That is more than just an extreme version of countersteering. It means that the bike will immediately straighten to the direction of travel when the rear end gets traction. The rider virtually has to be standing on the pegs to pull this off. Typically, cruisers will almost always high side in these conditions, because the rider's feet are so far forward and the seat is so low it's almost impossible to get up on your feet fast enough to control it, not to mention the fact that a road bike is pretty heavy and you might not be able to stop the "flop" anyway. Standards, sport bikes, and dual sports are a lot more likely to let a good rider save it, but then, a good rider probably won't get into that situation very often, either.
 

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I have saved myself from a high side more than once on a 'tour" bike. One especially disturbing day was when I was riding to work a bit before dawn. A white tail deer jumped onto the wet road in front of me and stood still. I started extreme braking and broke the rear wheel loose on my HD Ultra. As I got closer the deer decided to give me a bit of a break and turned back the way it had come. By then I was about 20 degrees off to one side with the rear wheel sliding. I let off the rear brake and regained control but it was not easy. If I had not regained control I would definitely have high sided the bike.
Back to your statement. I have never ridden much in the dirt and have no experience except bad ones when I tried to do that. I can wash out a front wheel faster than anyone I know in the dirt.
When I recovered and avoided a high side I did not stand on the pegs, in fact my HD had no pegs. I stayed seated and controlled the bike. The bike I was on at the time weighs over 850 pounds dry so yes it is heavy but as always it is finesse that gets you out of trouble, not brute force or preconceived ideas.
 

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SOME riders can pull it off. Part of the finesse is shifting your weight to your feet. What your feet are on is beside the point. Usually, floorboards are farther back than forward mount pegs. Sounds like you've spent very little time on dirt bikes, but a lot of time on cruisers. I personally have done the same thing on a Honda Shadow 1100, when a car pulled out across in front of me, but momentum shoved me up onto the pegs, with my knees under the handlebars. For MOST riders, bikes with pegs beneath them are easier to control in difficult situations. No racing bike of any kind has forward pegs.
 
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