Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,154 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A few weeks ago l was having trouble with my bike not shifting very cleanly. Someone suggested that l change the oil, so l did, and it seemed to fix the problem. Recently it has started shifting rough again. I will do my best to explain what it is doing. It is a 2004 Suzuki SV650.

When starting it in gear with the clutch pulled in, it lunges forward a little bit. This suggested to me that it wasn't fully engaging.

When going through the gears, it was not shifting cleanly. Occasionally it would not want to go into 1st from neutral. It felt gummy as l shifted up through the gears.

My co-worker and l got out my manual today and adjusted the clutch. The clutch has 3 adjustments; one is a housing for the linkage that is adjusted by a center bolt with a flat-tip screwdriver. This was where the book said l should make the first adjustment. The second was a few inches up the cable from there, with two small nuts and a one inch long threaded piece that can be adjusted up or down. The 3rd is at the lever itself, which is adjusted with a plier. My understanding is that this adjustment is for fine tuning.

Well, after an hour or so of playing with the two adjustments that are down near the shift linkage, we got it so that it shifts more cleanly. However, it makes more of a clunk into gear, and it is really difficult to roll when in gear with the clutch pulled in. When starting in gear with the clutch pulled in, it didn't lunge as much anymore, but still did a little bit. I feel like we were just kind of guessing at this point, since neither of us had ever done before.

If anyone can explain what the trick is, and how each adjustment actually affects the system that would be fantastic. Is there a good starting point and them something that you look for as you make adjustments? Hey thanks!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,480 Posts
Similar adjustments to my old 450. The adjustment at the lever and with the two small nuts adjust the cable, while the one with the screwdriver head sets the gap for the throwout rod. When I set mine up, I first disconnected the cable at the lever, so the cable wouldn't interfere with the throwout adjustment. Then, I turned the throwout adjustment until it was just snug, then backed it off just a bit, so there was a small gap, which is needed to allow for expansion due to temperature changes. Then, I set the other two to get the cable snug, without too much turned out at the lever, and then set the free play in the lever; I set it so that the cable pulls tight when the lever has a gap of about 1/16" from its seat, at the wide end. Hope this helps, and good luck.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,659 Posts
Drag

The clutch plates are soaked in oil, that creates drag. Pull the front brake with your big finger, if you start it in gear. Better to not start it in gear, but hold the front brake on when you clunk it in first. The creep forward is normal when the oil is not warm. Can even happen when it is a bit warm. All my opinion only, others may differ.
However: My XS400 does it first thing, my XS11 shifts like a Mack truck, and my SV1000 creeps.
The diaphragm clutch that Norton used starting around 69, worked real sweet.

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,154 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the tips guys. I will try again in the morning when l am fresh. I have a feeling l adjusted it too far the other way, and there is a sweet spot somewhere in the middle
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,480 Posts
Just FYI, setting the throwout first usually provides the most motion of the throwout rod, because of where the lever that the cable pulls ends up when the hand lever is released; it does on my 450, anyway. That gets the most lift on the clutch plates, so drag from the oil is at a minimum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,154 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Wintrsol. When l rode it home last night it was much better. I think because when l took it for my little test ride at lunch it never got up to temperature. I think it could use a little fine tuning, but l am on the right track
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
I'm not reading above but a wet clutch needs 1. oil specially formulated for wet clutches and 2. to start in NEUTRAL each and every time.

The clutch disengages the spring holding the clutch plates together, they are able to stick together on their own. Starting the bike in neutral and revving it a few times breaks the built up connection between the clutch plates, allowing you a smooth shift into first gear.

Your SV does not like Synthetic, that is what I heard at the track this weekend.

Also, The SV's ran advanced with all the other 600's this weekend at my track day. They annihilated the track, so you should have no reason to upgrade just yet, but you should do a track day ASAP!

This will make you love your SV more bud. Check it out, and start riding instead of spending all day with the forum :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,154 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I'm not reading above but a wet clutch needs 1. oil specially formulated for wet clutches and 2. to start in NEUTRAL each and every time.

The clutch disengages the spring holding the clutch plates together, they are able to stick together on their own. Starting the bike in neutral and revving it a few times breaks the built up connection between the clutch plates, allowing you a smooth shift into first gear.

Your SV does not like Synthetic, that is what I heard at the track this weekend.

Also, The SV's ran advanced with all the other 600's this weekend at my track day. They annihilated the track, so you should have no reason to upgrade just yet, but you should do a track day ASAP!

This will make you love your SV more bud. Check it out, and start riding instead of spending all day with the forum :D

For the record, l always start the bike in neutral.I had just always found that it was a good guage of whether or not the clutch is engaging properly. I will try that trick of revving it before l shift into gear.

I had not heard that they didn't like synthetic oil; l thought most new bikes were designed for it.

Asfar as liking my bike...l love my bike! But the forward position doesn't like me so much. I guess l am not a kid anymore. I am going to get something that is more upright.

And l ride everyday...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,154 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Well, l rolled my bike back into the shop and went about adjusting the clutch cable again. While l felt a bit frustrated the other day, it was not without gain, as l have a lot better understanding of how the system works now. My mistake was that l needed to lengthen the cable, but the sheath was good where it was. I had lengthened the sheath as well. I took it back to where l had found it in the first place, then turned the cable out while leaving the sheath in place and bam! It is now shifting very nicely, finds neutral easily, and is quieter. The only thing is, it is still a bit noisy going into 1st when it isn't fully warmed up. But it has always done that, so l think that is more likely just typical behavior for these bikes when they are cold.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top