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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a 1971 Suzuki TS185 I bought from a scrapyard a few years back. It took me a while but I've finally got it up and running. The major issue is that it desn't seem to be shifting up.

With the clutch engaged, I press down on the gear shift and it clicks once. Then, I pull up on the gear shift and it clicks once. That's as far as I can get in either direction.

With it running (the chain is off), I can see the sprocket spinning no matter what I do to the gear shift. When I rev the engine, is spins faster.


Any suggestions? I have had to split the crank case to replace a few seals but it all went together pretty smoothly. This is my first bike so I don't really know what shifting is supposed to feel like.

Thank you!
John
 

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I've got a 1971 Suzuki TS185 I bought from a scrapyard a few years back. It took me a while but I've finally got it up and running. The major issue is that it desn't seem to be shifting up.

With the clutch engaged, I press down on the gear shift and it clicks once. Then, I pull up on the gear shift and it clicks once. That's as far as I can get in either direction.
So, engine not running during this test? If not running, and with nothing spinning the output shaft, this is normal, as the gears have to be turning to shift properly. If you turn the output sprocket by hand, or by spinning the wheel with the chain connected, you should be able to shift it with the clutch disengaged (lever pulled). BTW, when the clutch is engaged, the engine is connected to the transmission to move the bike.

With it running (the chain is off), I can see the sprocket spinning no matter what I do to the gear shift. When I rev the engine, is spins faster.
Do we assume it spins with the transmission in neutral? If so, then, again, normal, as both transmission shafts will turn when the engine is running, if there is nothing to stop the output, because of oil slightly binding the non-engaged gears to the output shaft. With it in neutral, or the clutch disengaged, you should be able to stop the output from spinning by rubbing something against it (carefully). This is easier, and more safe, to do with the chain connected to the wheel, using the brake to stop the wheel. You should also be able to shift through all the gears with the engine running.


Any suggestions? I have had to split the crank case to replace a few seals but it all went together pretty smoothly. This is my first bike so I don't really know what shifting is supposed to feel like.

Thank you!
John
I suggest you find the most valuable tool, if you haven't already: a shop manual. A good shop manual should illustrate how the transmission works.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
WintrSol,
Thank you! This was the sort of insight I was hoping for.

So, engine not running during this test?
No, for this part, the engine was not running. What you describes makes sense and fits past experience.
Sorry for reversing my terminology. The clutch was Disengaged during my tests.

With it in neutral, or the clutch disengaged, you should be able to stop the output from spinning by rubbing something against it (carefully).
I will try this in the morning.


I suggest you find the most valuable tool, if you haven't already: a shop manual. A good shop manual should illustrate how the transmission works.
I have the 1971 TS185 service manual (which tells you to reference the TS125 service manual) and a copy of the 1978 TS125 service manual. Between those and the internet, I was able to rebuild the engine and get through a lot of troubleshooting. The 78's seem to be close enough to my bike. Now that the thing runs, I'll probably buy that 1971 TS125 manual once I get some extra cash.

Anyway, thank you again for sharing your knowledge. Sounds like you've provided the sort of details was missing.
 
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