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If I were to get a 650, do you think it’d be too heavy then? Also I do have about 120 hours of experience on a 110cc pitbike, do you think that’ll help me with starting my street riding?
I would agree with @Doc Samson, the Ninja 650 would be tops. What are your dimensions? Height, weight, and build? I really like your plan and the fact your parents are holding your grades and any tickets over your head shows me they care a lot about you and are using it to keep you on the straight and narrow for safety sake. I also like that you will have you dad as a riding partner. You can learn together and you have someone to lean on through the entire process. Good Luck on your quest and I wish you many years of fun on 2 wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
I would agree with @Doc Samson, the Ninja 650 would be tops. What are your dimensions? Height, weight, and build? I really like your plan and the fact your parents are holding your grades and any tickets over your head shows me they care a lot about you and are using it to keep you on the straight and narrow for safety sake. I also like that you will have you dad as a riding partner. You can learn together and you have someone to lean on through the entire process. Good Luck on your quest and I wish you many years of fun on 2 wheels.
I’m about 5’6” 135 pounds. I’ve been growing a bit since I last checked everything however. What do you mean by my build? I like the plan too, while I consider myself a responsible person it’s good to have that keeping me in check just in case.
 

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What do you mean by my build?
Would you consider yourself to be thin, medium, or heavy body build. Are you musculure? Are you strong. I'm 5'7" and 140 when wet. My bike is 500+ lbs. I'm your senior by about 58 years, you shouldn't have a major problem handling the weight of a Ninja 650. Handling bikes is a technique, take your time, learn, and pay attention, you will be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Would you consider yourself to be thin, medium, or heavy body build. Are you musculure? Are you strong. I'm 5'7" and 140 when wet. My bike is 500+ lbs. I'm your senior by about 58 years, you shouldn't have a major problem handling the weight of a Ninja 650. Handling bikes is a technique, take your time, learn, and pay attention, you will be fine.
About medium. Not majorly muscular but I am stronger than the average people I know(not counting some of my friends who lift everyday). When I was at the dealer a while ago the 650 didn’t seem heavy at all, was a lot lighter than I was expecting. I plan to learn all the motorcycling techniques to the best of my ability and will definitely be trying to take my time to learn as I don’t want to make a fool of myself.
 

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OK, I'm going to pitch in a few cents' worth. Don't take any of this the wrong way, I'm not trying to be a jerk.
A teenager who's only ridden something you can just about pick up over your head has no reason to be concerned about 'maximum lean angle' or any of that kind of stuff. Any old clunker you get on will exceed anything you have any business doing, for a year or three anyway. In fact, you'll learn better if it doesn't have the best performance, and makes you work for it.
As some have said, get training and spend lots of time on practice. The low-speed, boring parking lot kind, repeating the exercises in the training class. You will make mistakes. Make them in a safe environment.
Since you WILL make mistakes, the best bike for you is one that will forgive you the most when you do. Take it from the many of us who have been there, that means not a lot of weight and not a lot of power. No more than 4-500 cc's, that'll still give you plenty of jollies. A 250 or 300 would be even better.
Regardless of what bike you start on, there's about a 90% chance you'll want something else before long. I started on a sport bike that was a great bike, and I enjoyed it, but within 6 months I figured out that was completely the wrong type of bike. I found out I'm a cruiser guy and I had to get a cruiser, period. So I had to get rid of that nice sportybike to make room in the garage. You're not getting married, you're looking for a first bike. Don't try to pick a lifetime career bike now, get a low-cost learner and understand you'll be graduating from it later. The right bike for later is not the right bike to start on now.
For that matter, at your age with any luck at all you have decades of riding ahead of you. You will no doubt have many bikes by the time you get old like some of us, the first one is really not that significant in the long run.
 

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the first one is really not that significant in the long run.
Not true! You NEVER forget your first... 😈

If I am honest, I probably should have kept my 300 for another year. I thought I was ready for the jump but I swear it felt like I was gonna slide right up onto the pillion seat the first few times I really got on the throttle! :LOL:
 

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Discussion Starter #47
OK, I'm going to pitch in a few cents' worth. Don't take any of this the wrong way, I'm not trying to be a jerk.
A teenager who's only ridden something you can just about pick up over your head has no reason to be concerned about 'maximum lean angle' or any of that kind of stuff. Any old clunker you get on will exceed anything you have any business doing, for a year or three anyway. In fact, you'll learn better if it doesn't have the best performance, and makes you work for it.
As some have said, get training and spend lots of time on practice. The low-speed, boring parking lot kind, repeating the exercises in the training class. You will make mistakes. Make them in a safe environment.
Since you WILL make mistakes, the best bike for you is one that will forgive you the most when you do. Take it from the many of us who have been there, that means not a lot of weight and not a lot of power. No more than 4-500 cc's, that'll still give you plenty of jollies. A 250 or 300 would be even better.
Regardless of what bike you start on, there's about a 90% chance you'll want something else before long. I started on a sport bike that was a great bike, and I enjoyed it, but within 6 months I figured out that was completely the wrong type of bike. I found out I'm a cruiser guy and I had to get a cruiser, period. So I had to get rid of that nice sportybike to make room in the garage. You're not getting married, you're looking for a first bike. Don't try to pick a lifetime career bike now, get a low-cost learner and understand you'll be graduating from it later. The right bike for later is not the right bike to start on now.
For that matter, at your age with any luck at all you have decades of riding ahead of you. You will no doubt have many bikes by the time you get old like some of us, the first one is really not that significant in the long run.
I know I’ll have a lot to learn and I’ll most likely make mistakes along the way, but my main goal is to learn as fast as I can while gaining plenty of skill. I know that I want something decently sporty for the turns(as even if I can’t use the full potential immediately, I garuntee you I’ll learn how to), not into cruiser style bikes in the slightest. Other than that pitbike I had a Baja Warrior which was like a little cruiser and immediately got tired of it, constantly had the pegs scraping around turns and removed the governed throttle just to at least make it slightly enjoyable in the straight stuff. Also rode a old Kawasaki around(100cc dualsport) but that’s about it for my experience. In the short time I’d owned that pitbike(about 3/4 months) I was already starting to corner with a decent amount of lean(on the pavement, not much access to anything else, but was improving in the grass too) and the only thing that stopped me from trying to lean it any farther was the fact that I was running dirt bike tires on pavement and didn’t want to risk the tires losing grip at any decent speed. In terms of not having the best performance to work for it, I agree with that power wise. However a great handling bike with low power I see as no issue, as you’d have to learn how to carry more speed through the corners and learn its limits so you could end up being faster coming through the corner. It’s the same way I learned how to drive fast(I know, very different in terms of how to be fast on a car vs bike). I honestly only care about how it feels and goes through the corners, I’m not buying a bike to try and impress others with immense speed. I’d like basically a CBR400RR or something like that, low power but great handling, brakes, etc. However that isn’t available over here in the United States and the closest thing I’ve found to that is the RC390, which I’ve strayed away from because I’m not sure how reliable they are and many people seem to have issues with them.
 
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