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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey people...The man I just purchased my mint '85 Moto Morini from is now selling off more of his collection. I've never seen such cherry bikes before. Take a look at what he's got now. That Moto Guzzi! My Gawd! What a stunner! If I had the wallet for it, I'd be bidding on my second Italian! But you won't get away cheap...and these are worth every penny. Show stuff!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1987-Moto-...h=item1eeff09c5b:g:y7cAAOSw~5dcAxzf:rk:4:pf:0
 

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Just a foot note.
It is critical that folks do some research before getting too excited about some models.
My Trophy has a sprag gear problem. Some Guzzis had head valve problems. Oil in the frame Triumphs leaked at the bottom plate. CB650 Hondas had OHC issues. The XS1100 has second gear problems. Just a few examples to consider.

There are some good articles written about the Guzzi Lemans. I would like to have one.

The Moto Morini made 35 hp with a claimed top speed of 106. The sport model makes 39 hp with a 97 top speed.
I have mentioned before how I felt some specifications were suspect.
The Ton up boys were trying to do the ton with 45 to 48 hp.

UK
 

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Just a foot note.
Oil in the frame Triumphs leaked at the bottom plate.
They sure did - Owned a 73 for a while.

Good point about doing research - every bike seems to have quirks no matter how collectable or valuable it is. My 78 CB750F is known for valve guide issues at about 30K and sure enough, that's one hurdle I had to cross when I built it.

My 76 Sportster is well.. very AMF.

Heck, my 03 Concours is known for cam pitting which I addressed last winter.

All of my old Goldwings (1000s and 1100s) were pretty sweet though.. maybe the lack of mechanical quirks was a quirk.
 

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But somehow when I see that Guzzi I don't care what quirks it has...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
But somehow when I see that Guzzi I don't care what quirks it has...
It's true that ALL bikes have quirks. If you want a garage/living room/show queen...the quirks aren't much to be concerned about, right? Look at how much money the old Brit bikes cost now. I love the looks of the Triumph, Norton, BSA, Matchless, etc...but if you want quirks, go directly to the Brits and you'll have all you need! :smile_big:

I may only pet mine and give it a hug on occasion.
 

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From above.
In 1934 Norton made a primary chain case cover that leaked oil. It leaked oil for 34 years, before they fixed it with the 69 Commando.
A friend and I bought two Commandos in 71, and his leaked oil out of the new and improved chain case cover. The O ring was not put in place correctly.

In about 1970 or 71, I was at a dealers meeting with the Triumph reps. Two things the dealers were having problems with, other than too many warranty issues, were: Oil leaking from the bottom plate on the oil in the frame models, and cylinders wearing out too soon, as in 20,000 miles.
The replies. We are having trouble machining the surface area of the frame, where that plate attaches. From now on the plate will be made from aluminium instead of steel. We hope that it will bend a bit to conform to the frame shape.
We are having problems getting a reliable source for our cylinder castings. Some seem to have too much sand?? in the castings, and are wearing quickly. Also it is difficult to drill a perfectly round hole.

Some of us had recently watched a Honda video showing a machine drilling four nice round holes for a CB750.

Triumph had a 3 month warranty, Honda 6 months. We would get about 1 warranty claim for every 10 bikes with Honda. We got about ( thinking ) 3 or 4 claims for every Triumph. Honda always asked for specific details, and suggestions on how to fix the problem. Triumph were not very interested to hear about it. Just as the entire British industry did not want to hear anyone else's opinion.

The better frames found on most British bikes, did not originate from the factories. They came from outside frame makers, who were easily able to show they were superior. Reynolds for the Norton Featherbed frame. The Rickman brothers, and several others. The Rickman frame was so good, the big name brands would not sell them engines.
My 68 Dunstall had a Reynolds frame.

For those so inclined. Go ahead and buy one of those old British things for too much money. Others who do the research, will be riding Guzzis, Yamaha, Honda and the new breed of Triumph.

UK
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
From above.
In 1934 Norton made a primary chain case cover that leaked oil. It leaked oil for 34 years, before they fixed it with the 69 Commando.
A friend and I bought two Commandos in 71, and his leaked oil out of the new and improved chain case cover. The O ring was not put in place correctly.

In about 1970 or 71, I was at a dealers meeting with the Triumph reps. Two things the dealers were having problems with, other than too many warranty issues, were: Oil leaking from the bottom plate on the oil in the frame models, and cylinders wearing out too soon, as in 20,000 miles.
The replies. We are having trouble machining the surface area of the frame, where that plate attaches. From now on the plate will be made from aluminium instead of steel. We hope that it will bend a bit to conform to the frame shape.
We are having problems getting a reliable source for our cylinder castings. Some seem to have too much sand?? in the castings, and are wearing quickly. Also it is difficult to drill a perfectly round hole.

Some of us had recently watched a Honda video showing a machine drilling four nice round holes for a CB750.

Triumph had a 3 month warranty, Honda 6 months. We would get about 1 warranty claim for every 10 bikes with Honda. We got about ( thinking ) 3 or 4 claims for every Triumph. Honda always asked for specific details, and suggestions on how to fix the problem. Triumph were not very interested to hear about it. Just as the entire British industry did not want to hear anyone else's opinion.

The better frames found on most British bikes, did not originate from the factories. They came from outside frame makers, who were easily able to show they were superior. Reynolds for the Norton Featherbed frame. The Rickman brothers, and several others. The Rickman frame was so good, the big name brands would not sell them engines.
My 68 Dunstall had a Reynolds frame.

For those so inclined. Go ahead and buy one of those old British things for too much money. Others who do the research, will be riding Guzzis, Yamaha, Honda and the new breed of Triumph.

UK
You've got a wealth of information, UK. Thanks. Always enjoy learning new stuff! BTW...I just looked up the name of the gentleman who sold me the Moto Morini and has the museum. He's VERY famous in NY, and on Wikipedia...a multi-millionaire entrepreneur and philanthropist...much history on him and photos on the net. He's got quite the sense of humor too. He built a formula one race track as well. You should see the cars he owns! :surprise:
 
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