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I have a 1965 Honda c110 that I am rebuilding. I'm trying to get the crankcase off to clean out the inside. All the bolts are rusted stuck I cannot get them out. I've tried a tourch, pb blaster, stripped screw removal. Any body have another way? Or could I just cut away the crank case and buy a new one. Also if I do that is it possible to weld the case back together?
 

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Welding the case is not usually practical if a large section has been damaged.

The best tool I have found for removing those tough screws is a hand impact driver.
 

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And depending just how bad you might get into even more trouble with a hand impact. So be prepared to have to drill. And the best there is a left hand twist drill bit. Take your time and be very careful with the impact tool. Use plenty of lubricant to help free it and wait for it to work. Days into weeks is best.
 

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A 1965 Honda? That's a frequent problem 'cause people think they are Philips screws but they AREN'T - they were JIS screws until around 1970. Very similar in appearance to Philips but different angles. A Philips driver does NOT fit a JIS screw worth a darn so many of them get buggered up. Start by getting yourself a set of JIS bits. JIS screws are not all the same sizes as today's Metric screws so be warned.

A 1965 Honda should not have steel screws and would not be rusted. If they are rusty, someone may have replaced them with different screws and they could be cross-threaded because the JIS sizes and threads were different.

As to extracting a stuck screw, my last-ditch method is to make a centre-punch mark 2/3 of the way to the edge. (On a pan head screw, you can do this right on the outside edge.) Get or make a very small tipped chisel, put it in the punch mark at about a 45 degree angle and tap in the direction to loosen the screw. I have never had a screw that didn't come loose this way.
 

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I've had the best luck on old Hondas with the reverse-cut drills and a hammer drill. Before that, I used hammer drivers. Last ditch, like DB, is the punch or chisel method.
 

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+1 on the JIS bits!!!

Personally, if the heads are stripped out I would either cut a slot for a flat head, or drill the heads off and grab the shank with vice grips once the cover is off.

Do not cut the cover off.
 

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+1 on the JIS bits!!!

Personally, if the heads are stripped out I would either cut a slot for a flat head, or drill the heads off and grab the shank with vice grips once the cover is off.

Do not cut the cover off.
I've had to do that, too. Sometimes the reverse drills get you there quickly enough.

The JIS type screwdrivers are a must, especially when working on the carbs, and almost all radio control models. Of course, I've been known to replace the cross-point screws with socket head ones, once I get the chance.
 

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Japanese bolts that hold the cases on are very very hard.
If you try to drill and use a very small easyout on them, you will most likely have to redrill the block for new screws. The idea here is not to do anything that a gasket won't seal up.

You will need a drill for very hard metal. It is not cheap, and they are easy to break off, so go slow, stay centered, and (sorry) you will still probably have to redrill and put in new bolts.

You can break the case away, but remember, you are still going to have to get the bolts out somehow. I would say...not an option.
 

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Japanese bolts that hold the cases on are very very hard.
They are now, but back in '65 they were fairly easily damaged; I've drilled out many over the years. The steel was soft enough that using a Phillips on them could damage the heads the first time.
 

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Drill

Was common practice to drill out the bolts, and threads that held English engines together. Then install helicoils. I used allen head screws. Sometimes the holes needed filing with aluminum weld. Some holes had cracks next to them. The mounts for the generator would snap off. The bolts that hold the plate on the bottom of the engine would vibrate loose and fall out.

Unkle Krusty*
 

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grab the head of the bolt with a vise grips, and stick a short hex screwdriver tip in the end of the bolt.

put lots of torque on the bolt with the vise grips and hit the bolt keep hitting and pressure turn the bolt out. if it brakes off, it should leave only a stub that will be sticking out of the crank case that you can easily remove using the same method.
 

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Lots of options

Read this first
http://www.dansmc.com/stripbolt.htm

And then this
http://www.dansmc.com/acid.htm. Just do not burn yourself, the kids or the dog!

All I will add is that before I even think about taking out a case screw, I use this product and walk away at least overnight. It is much better to walk past the bike every day for TWO WEEKS and spray a bit of this product on the screws before even attempting anything. Then I take a flat tipped punch and hammer and strike it a whack or two before anything else.Light whacks during the two week baptism will not hurt either. I have taken out impossibly stuck screws with buggered heads only half there.

And here is the product http://crcindustries.com/auto/?s=05002. Not trying to argue with anyone here, but it works like a boss if you have time and patience. My theory is that the screw heads contacting the case have much more to do with being stuck than the actual threads do. I have been forced to drill a few heads off, and in all that I have tried, the remaining threads are easy to remove from the case. YMMV

In fact, when I buy an old bike or occasionally on my running bikes,i have been known to apply the product to keep things nice to work on.
 

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A small sharp carbide concrete drill can be used if you need to drill out a hardened steel screw or bolt. The small ones, such as those sold for installing Tapcons, work very well as long as they're sharp, and they are relatively cheap.
 

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Head grabbing.

Slum, what you said about the head grabbing, rather than the threads seizing.
That was the case with the bolt that holds on the aluminum oil filter cover, on the XS11. Would not budge. I cut the head off and removed the now damaged cover.
The bolt came out with just my fingers turning it.

I had a spare bolt, filter and cover in inventory.

Unkle Krusty*
 
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