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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The dyno run shows a comparison between the R and RS models.

The RS is targeted for the track and the R for the street. Mechanically the engines are the same with identical cams, intakes, and exhausts. Differences in their respective power curves are purely due to tuning.

The R actually has higher max torque overall and more horsepower up to 11,000 rpm at which point the RS pulls even and then gains horsepower until the 12,600 redline where it tops out with about 2.32 horsepower more than the R.

The RS comes with other goodies that are track oriented (suspension, brakes, tires, and a quick shifter), worth the $1,100 difference if you plan on track days. Otherwise, the R seems the better choice for street use.

 

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I've always wanted a Street triple, I'm jealous. Bike reviews are always good, fast, light and agile. The 765 is the new engine for Moto 2 replacing the Honda engines. Rumor is maybe a new Daytona 765 coming soon as they have a bike already built to test the 765 Moto 2 engine.
 

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Wot were the numbers OZ? The link is not working for me. HP, Torque and dry weight is all I need. Of course I can also look it up.

UK
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Wot were the numbers OZ? The link is not working for me. HP, Torque and dry weight is all I need. Of course, I can also look it up.

UK
UK, 366 lbs dry weight. Here's the comparison measured at the rear wheel.

R = 114.79HP 76.17 torque
RS = 117.11HP 73.49 torque​
 

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Real sweet Ozz. Good all round numbers. Good horsepower, good weight and the torque number is surprisingly high, even at a bunch of revs.
It will out run my SV. 108 hp at the rear wheel, 72 torque if I remember correctly, but at lower revs, 410 pounds dry.
I can probably get 115 hp with different mufflers, and having a chat with the ECU.
Bikes under 375 are so much more fun to ride. Your bike will also have better suspension and brakes than mine. I think you will find yourself going quicker, easier.
I have the advantage of saddle bags and rear box for carrying junk.

The Trophy 900 is 98 hp and 482 pounds. It went flat on me the other day. WOT in fourth up a steep hill. 5000 revs and noddy said that is all he had. Needed to buzz him more in third, so he hits fourth around 6000 or higher. Will try again in the dry.
Checked him on the flat, and 7500 comes easy.

UK
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
...the torque number is surprisingly high, even at a bunch of revs...
I think you're right. Looks like the dyno run mixed units of measure. I'll bet that's newton meters instead of foot pounds. If they did mix up the units that would be 56.79 ft lbs.
 

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Agreed. The graph is showing newton meters.
The horsepower at around 10,000 is similar to the SV. The extra giddy up is coming from the twilight zone, over 10,000.
The need to keep it buzzing, will be offset a bit by the lighter weight. When push comes to shove, dropping a couple of gears will send you on your way, in a hurry.
You will match the big bores most of the time, and smoke most in the twisties.

UK
 

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My 2012 Triumph Rocket 3 Roadster has some impressive Dyno stats:grin:

It's amazing what technology has added to the race for more HP and torque.:wink2:

Read about the small 2.7 L and 3.5 L twin turbo, V6 engines that Ford has been putting in the F150 series pickup like I have:surprise:

Triumph has come a long way!

I was on a Veteran's day ride about 8 years ago and we were parked, as a group in front of our destination, a VFW/ DAV center when a sound straight from motorcycle Nirvana could be heard approaching us.:smile_big: It was a 'Sprint' with a custom made 3 into 1 exhaust and it sounded better to me than any bike I'd ever heard including the Honda CBX1000 with a 6 into 1 exhaust:grin:

Sam:nerd:
 

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I can't wait to hear 30-40 of the 765's race engines roaring down the front straight at the start of next season's Moto 2 championship.
 

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I can't wait to hear 30-40 of the 765's race engines roaring down the front straight at the start of next season's Moto 2 championship.
I am looking forward to it as well. The lap times will get closer to the bike boys.
The last triples I rode before my Trophy, were all of the Kawasakis. Many of the Triumph guys, are drooling over some non stock pipes for their triples. Mine is so quiet I can not hear the exhaust note.

UK
 

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I bought the first ST 765RS in Thailand, and am very pleased with the purchase. I ride it at Bangkok gokart exclusively. I'm not concerned with how much power it makes, but the handling, tracking and braking is just sublime
 

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The dyno run shows a comparison between the R and RS models.

The RS is targeted for the track and the R for the street. Mechanically the engines are the same with identical cams, intakes, and exhausts. Differences in their respective power curves are purely due to tuning.

The R actually has higher max torque overall and more horsepower up to 11,000 rpm at which point the RS pulls even and then gains horsepower until the 12,600 redline where it tops out with about 2.32 horsepower more than the R.

The RS comes with other goodies that are track oriented (suspension, brakes, tires, and a quick shifter), worth the $1,100 difference if you plan on track days. Otherwise, the R seems the better choice for street use.

I own a 2018 Street Triple RS, the bike is not a light bike, wet weight is 421lbs. A little on the heavy side!
 

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Not saying it's a bad bike, does everything well and does not excel in anything. Probably one of the best bikes I've owned to date. From reading and researching before I purchased the bike all reviews claim that this was a light bike, not true. My son's GSX-R750 came in aprox. 416lbs. I was surprised it was lighter than the RS. I am in no way putting down the bike but don't believe everything you read!!!
 

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Most of us consider a bike in the low 400's to be light. Hell my Springer at the mid 500's is light compared to my Yamaha at over 700
 

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Most of us consider a bike in the low 400's to be light. Hell my Springer at the mid 500's is light compared to my Yamaha at over 700
Your right, depends where you coming from. My case is I track and canyon ride and I like a light bike with my level of riding, especially on a track. Guys and gals run very fast times on a Kawasaki 400 modified suspension and tires running close to track records. Usually the lighter bikes run better times on a 600cc track. Not saying a liter bike doesn't make good times but only a few AMA riders come close to the 600's. The 600's are coming in wet under 400lbs. The Kawasaki's 400 Ninja come in around 340lbs. wet. When I mean wet on a track with only a couple gallons of fuel which saves over 12lbs. Different strokes for different folks!!! Reason for purchasing my RS was hype on a track oriented bike and at my level of riding at that time this was my next step up to more power and handling. My next bike will be the GSX-R750, which was my 1st. bike in 2011. Very nice street and track bike. Be Safe!!!
st: 2598105, member: 74524"]
Most of us consider a bike in the low 400's to be light. Hell my Springer at the mid 500's is light compared to my Yamaha at ove[/QUOTE]
 
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