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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, second post. (summary recap (newbie) took basics (2days) on a 250, got endorsement, have a 1300 in the driveway). have read and watched dozens of mcrider, ride like a pro vids. Got the head stuff and have saddled, walked and rocked alot, rode the frictions zone down the drive way and walked it back a few times. Have been working out on a left hand spring grip strengthener often. do not want to sell this bike and buy a smaller one. went to a bike dealer and was tempted to ask to take a test ride but most bikes were the same size or larger. I honestly think if I can get in a few rides on a smaller bike (500,650, 750) I will have the confidence to get to a lot with my 1300. thoughts, suggestions, ideas. I'm really getting depressed. Never wanted anything that seems just beyond my reach in ages. I really want to do this. Getting frustrated.
 

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2015 BMW K1600GTL & 2008 Harley Davidson Dyna Super Glide Custom
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You're right to be scared. That's a big bike and you don't ride yet. Go buy a smaller bike and get used to riding, you can keep the 1300, and when you're ready, sell the small bike and you'll be able to ride the 1300. There are tons of cheap 250's to 650's and such, you won't lose a dime

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Okay, you're going to do it. Wait til Sunday, or a time when traffic is very light. Figure out where you are going to go. Do you live in a neighborhood where 4 left, or right, turns will bring you right back to your house? Or can you ride a short distance down the street and turn in to a large parking lot?

If you can cruise around your neighborhood in first and second gear, what you're comfortable with, great. Don't worry if you can't downshift yet as you approach a STOP sign. Just pull in the clutch and downshift after you stop. The more you ride, the more shifting will become normal to you.

Or ride down to the parking lot. Hopefully a mostly empty parking lot. Then just ride around in first gear, just making left and right turns. Riding slow is hard, anyone can ride fast, (not talking about racing now). Just do some slow, comfortable to you, left and right turns. Pick out a spot, head towards it and stop with your front tire as close to your "spot" as you can.

Feel how you bike responds to each of your inputs. How well your brakes work, front by itself, rear by itself, and both together how much faster you can stop. Get used to twisting the throttle and get used to how much, or how little, you need to twist it to get rolling again.

You can do it. Other people have started out on large bikes. Have you got a highway bar on your bike yet? At some point, you'll probably drop your bike. A highway bar will prevent a lot of damage. You need to watch the videos on how to pick up a heavy bike once it's dropped.

You've taken the riding course, you have your endorsement, you can do this. (And you've got everyone on this forum behind you. :) )
 

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Moderator - Loves All Motorcycles
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Both of those suggestions are great! If you can swing it, get a 250 to learn on. Then you can dump it for the price you paid when you feel you're ready for the 1300.

Otherwise, take short practice rides on the 1300 and little by little you'll get better and be able to daily the thing! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay, you're going to do it. Wait til Sunday, or a time when traffic is very light. Figure out where you are going to go. Do you live in a neighborhood where 4 left, or right, turns will bring you right back to your house? Or can you ride a short distance down the street and turn in to a large parking lot?

If you can cruise around your neighborhood in first and second gear, what you're comfortable with, great. Don't worry if you can't downshift yet as you approach a STOP sign. Just pull in the clutch and downshift after you stop. The more you ride, the more shifting will become normal to you.

Or ride down to the parking lot. Hopefully a mostly empty parking lot. Then just ride around in first gear, just making left and right turns. Riding slow is hard, anyone can ride fast, (not talking about racing now). Just do some slow, comfortable to you, left and right turns. Pick out a spot, head towards it and stop with your front tire as close to your "spot" as you can.

Feel how you bike responds to each of your inputs. How well your brakes work, front by itself, rear by itself, and both together how much faster you can stop. Get used to twisting the throttle and get used to how much, or how little, you need to twist it to get rolling again.

You can do it. Other people have started out on large bikes. Have you got a highway bar on your bike yet? At some point, you'll probably drop your bike. A highway bar will prevent a lot of damage. You need to watch the videos on how to pick up a heavy bike once it's dropped.

You've taken the riding course, you have your endorsement, you can do this. (And you've got everyone on this forum behind you. :) )
thanks, that's my initial goal, just as you mentioned. short rides down the driveway have made me aware that I have to strengthen my clutch grip for so much slow start/stop/riding so that's also been a concern. yes I have crash bars and foot rests.

I would get a smaller bike to practice on, cant find anything that runs for under 500. a lot of greedy people overpricing bikes out there. I was fortunate to get a good deal on a clean bike. I have seen nothing even close listed since I bought it 2 months ago. And dealers seem to have nothing on the small end at all to test ride.
 

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You can do it. Other people have started out on large bikes. Have you got a highway bar on your bike yet? At some point, you'll probably drop your bike. A highway bar will prevent a lot of damage. You need to watch the videos on how to pick up a heavy bike once it's dropped.

You've taken the riding course, you have your endorsement, you can do this. (And you've got everyone on this forum behind you. :) )
Excellent -- advice...

You don't need a 250, 125, or 500... The WWII generation learned to ride on 74-cube HD and Indians wirth no training whatever, or 650 Limey's... there was little else... take it easy, as RG notes, you don't need to run through the gears.. idle off, get used to the brakes, balance and feel of the bars...

Try to find a time when there is no audience -- often as not, screwing up in front of friends is more disturbing than just screwing up... if ya stall the bike, no biggie -- 99% of the folks on this forum have done it before you... once you have the confidence to trundle around the neighborhood, pick a slightly faster but uncrowded street -- the MSF stuff will come back to you quicker than you think...

Bestaluck...

-- Larry
 

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Heck, I was knee shaking afraid of a little Honda 185 and you've already ridden successfully a 250. You got me beat big time. You just need saddle time on the 1300. That fear will be good for you in the long run if you always keep reminding yourself to not test it. Once you get rolling down the road and can truly feel the power and know how to control it, you'll have it made. Early Sunday/today would be a perfect time to just do it. Good luck no matter when you do. It took me several weeks before I got the fear behind me. So you are doing better already.
 

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As others said, be careful (but not afraid), be gentle ( but not timid), be confident (but not cocky) and take that big bike out on a gentle, slow ride around town when there is no traffic and you will be fine. It's heavier than the 250 but you already learned the basics of riding on that bike, the same things apply to the bigger bike, and when it's moving the weight really doesn't matter much. Be careful with the throttle and clutch until your used to them but that won't take long at all. An hour on the road will have you feeling 100% more confident and then you can work on skills with traffic etc as you feel up to them.
 

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Lots of great advice above.
I would just like to add that being nervous or even scared is part of riding.
That feeling won't go away after your first ride or your 100th.
(Unless you're an idiot)
It's the thing that reminds you of the magnitude of what you are doing.
What you will learn to do is manage that feeling.
I've been riding for 13 years and still feel butterflies when I put my helmet on.
Learning to manage that feeling by taking baby steps will have big pay offs in riding and in other parts of your life also.

Remember, baby steps.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Great news. Keep it up, short trips in the parking lots. Practice the basics. Work up to more. Enjoy the rush.
 

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And one other thing....
Ride often!
If you only ride every Sunday, or every other week, you tend to forget what you learned.
Ride a bit every evening, even if only a short ride around the neighborhood. The more you do it, the more natural it becomes.
Good luck and keep the shiny side up!
 

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Congratulations! You broke the curse!

I DID IT! WhooHOO!! rode to a nearby empty lot and did lapse. It was awesome. My left hand is tired though. be working out on the gripper spring today again. I love this! it's amazing!! Yes!!! What a RUSH!! I'm still gonna babystep it. but the monkey is off my back!
 

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Amen to that!
That's the best advice I was ever given, my BRC coach gave us that in his debrief, before he signed us all as passing the course, he said to ride often, ride a lot, ride every day, the safest riders are the ones that ride all the time, in good weather, bad weather, night time, daytime, open road, city traffic, dirt roads, gravel roads, anytime they can, eventually you've seen it all and your prepared for whatever will come your way. I really took that to heart and it worked for me.


And one other thing....
Ride often!
If you only ride every Sunday, or every other week, you tend to forget what you learned.
Ride a bit every evening, even if only a short ride around the neighborhood. The more you do it, the more natural it becomes.
Good luck and keep the shiny side up!
 

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I haven't responded much on here yet. After 20-30 yrs away on July 4th I got a bike (a few days ago) A big one. 1500. yes, it's alot to hop back on to after being away from that long. I don't even have mu license yet. I had plans on a smaller bike for a time then graduation up but a deal came up and I couldn't pass on it. I was intimidated at first but it's all coming back and I'm doing pretty good. I have a nice large church that has 4 huge parking lots connected together with their own little streets that I have made a practice run to. I did 20 miles round and round. I have a trailer that I am hauling it with till I'm legal then I'll be branching out further.

So...if I can do this, you can do this. Stay positive. A little fear is good as long as it's a fear telling you to pay attention and focus. Leave the phone alone. Get your pics and selfies later. Not having someone watch you helps but also having someone with you till you feel a lot more confident and have some more experience may be a good idea. You may need a hand lifting it back up. Take some time too polishing you bike and looking at everything. That way if your in a pinch and something happens you won't be sitting far from home without a clue on what to do.
 
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