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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I won't be able to buy my own bike for about a year, but during that time I will have access to my father's versys 650. I'm just wondering how bad of an idea it is for that to be the first bike that I ride? I'm 5'9" (mostly leg tho), around 140 pounds and pretty muscular. I've also spent a fair amount of time just sitting on the bike and getting comfortable with the weight and feel of it, but of course I understand that's not the same thing as actually riding it.

The only reason I'm really considering just going with it is that because it's my dad's bike, he has a good feel for the bike and I would be practicing just riding in empty parking lots with him around to watch and help as need be before I ever go out on the road. If it's a stupid idea, please tell me because I obviously have no riding experience besides just sitting on the back, and need someone to just be blunt with me. Thanks!
 

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Well, considering some start riding a Harley Sportster 883, I'd ask, how's your balance? ride a regular bike ? ten speed? if so I'd say it could work out for ya, but when practicing just DON'T have front wheel turned and apply front brakes ! You'll go down like steel to a magnet, bars must always be squared before using front brake check out 'Ridelikeapro' he is online as well you can buy his book and video's. Put in browser Motorman does U-turns.

So, how are ya gonna get it to these parking lots? got a trailer or is your dad gonna ride it there, you as a passenger? what is the best you can do? well try getting familiar with the friction zone, keep eyes where ya want to go, a little pressure on rear brake and feather or slip the clutch. Check out MC rider a middle aged guy in Texas, he has some pretty good info, I watch him quite often. Get motorman's book and his video' VERY MUCH WORTH THE $$$$$. Got more ?'s send me a PM. Ride like a pro's phone #> 1866-868-7433

Ray's Sporty1200
 

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Those are a decent motorcycle for most to start on. The seat tends to be too high for shorter people, but if you can comfortably reach the ground they are fine.

I would suggest taking a riding course. You can get the equivalent of a year's experience in a weekend, and hopefully learn some things that can save your life.
 

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Those are a decent motorcycle for most to start on. The seat tends to be too high for shorter people, but if you can comfortably reach the ground they are fine.

I would suggest taking a riding course. You can get the equivalent of a year's experience in a weekend, and hopefully learn some things that can save your life.
The Versys can be a fine starter bike, particularly when you have a well thought out plan in place and understand what you are getting into. Empty parking lot with dad's supervision? Perfect! Sounds like you are ready to ride!
 

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I took the MSF course on 250's. After two days of the course I went out and bought a 650. Had no issues.

Highly recommend that you take the MSF course.
 

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What these guys said about taking the course. I am going to take it for the 3rd time this week, and I am looking forward to seeing what I can learn
 

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I took the Team Oregon safety course, then bought a used V Strom 650 as my first motorcycle. I spent a few weeks just riding side streets during off hours like early morning. I then rode the highway a bit during off hours. After that, I started commuting to work on it. You can do it, but don't rush it. Riding in traffic is not something to take lightly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Those are a decent motorcycle for most to start on. The seat tends to be too high for shorter people, but if you can comfortably reach the ground they are fine.

I would suggest taking a riding course. You can get the equivalent of a year's experience in a weekend, and hopefully learn some things that can save your life.
I did take (and pass) the safety course, so I have my endorsement now! Learned a lot in a really short time, and made a few friends that I plan to ride with in the future.

I can definitely comfortable reach the ground, I’m actually flat-footed and pretty stable. I think the main things I’ll struggle with is going from a 250 to a 650, and getting used to the balance and weight of the bike (I’ve heard from multiple people, including my father, that it’s a bit top-heavy). We’ll see when I actually ride it later this week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I took the MSF course on 250's. After two days of the course I went out and bought a 650. Had no issues.

Highly recommend that you take the MSF course.
What these guys said about taking the course. I am going to take it for the 3rd time this week, and I am looking forward to seeing what I can learn
I took the Team Oregon safety course, then bought a used V Strom 650 as my first motorcycle. I spent a few weeks just riding side streets during off hours like early morning. I then rode the highway a bit during off hours. After that, I started commuting to work on it. You can do it, but don't rush it. Riding in traffic is not something to take lightly.
I did take (and pass) the msf course, so I now have my endorsement and can legally drive a bike! I would love to take some more courses on the 650, it was crazy how much we learned and improved in just one weekend, so I think it would be a good idea for the 650. There’s lots of back roads with very little traffic around me, and I’ll definitely be going on those for a while before going on freeways or highways.
 

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I think you'll like the 650. The little 250s from the MSF are fun around town (I see why the Grom has a cult following) but can start becoming a bit of a pain when you're trying to keep up with expressway traffic. My daily is a Rebel 250 (my work commute doesn't exceed 35 mph) and the "weekend warrior" is a Blast.
 

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Just learn how to control your right wrist and then you can ride anything.:smile_big:

Try to learn on Rural country roads and just take it easy, expecting anything and everything to happen, so you will be ready if it does.:surprise:

I hope the Versey has ABS brakes.

Welcome to the forum:smile_big:

Sam:nerd:
 

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sounds like you are young, healthy and strong, and the fact that you are even asking this question shows that you have the maturity to take on the task. with your dad helping you i see nothing to worry about.
 

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I started with a 750 and had no problem. Unless you are set on a brand, find one that fits you and you should be good. As many others have said take the MSF course.
I bought a Honda as the cost was doable for me, however, other makes are in a starter price range also.
Good luck.
 

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Ok. I started riding in 1964, I'm 67 now and on bike number nine. It's a 2012 Yamaha Road Star, 1700 CC's, which I love.

If you look at the fatalities involving motorcycles, the majority of them are inexperience riders riding high power bikes.

Power is nice, if you know and have the experience to handle it. If not, it will kill you faster then you can ****.

Never ridden before, my advice, start at 350 or even lower. Their cheaper to repair.

When I first stated riding, I dropped my bike a few times, all of which was my fault do to inexperience. Now, I can't recall the last time I dropped a bike, but it was many bikes ago.

Take it as its worth.

Safe Riding

dave
 

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So my two cents to the conversation. U took the safety class, and passed using 250cc. Never rode before, so very new to me. I bought a used Kawasaki 1500cc. Yes it was a bit scary at first. My friend drove it to a empty parking lot on weekends. Just getting use to it, eventually started taking it on the road. Personally I think it needs to be more powerful to move the weight of the bike. I never feel out of control because I am in charge of the throttle.. I started older in life so I'm more cautious over all. I think you will do fine, just work with it and get use to how it handles. But in the end you will know if it's right for you. Good luck..☺
 
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